All posts in BMW

1989 BMW 325is

$_57 (5)

We’ve seen some great full-on Hartge automobiles here, and they’ve always struck me as an interesting (if not quite as desirable) alternative to Alpina. This 325is has no real Hartge provenance, but has had enough hard-to-find and period-correct pieces retrofitted to warrant mentioning. The factory original M-Tech II bodykit and cloth interior are nearly as desirable as the Hartge pieces, painting a picture of an owner who has spent a ton of time and effort sourcing parts to put together his perfect 325is. No doubt this is a gorgeous and carefully-composed love letter to the E30, but $21k is a lot of money for a 325is with 166k miles!

Click for details: 1989 BMW 325is on eBay

Continue reading this article

1991 BMW M5

While the E28 M5 only appeared in the US for one model year, BMW saw an opportunity in the marketplace for a high performance sedan and followed up with a second act, the E34 M5. The new M5 would follow the same formula as the car before, with a high-strung inline-6, 5-speed manual, tauter suspension and styling tweaks. A Touring variant would also become available for the first time. With just over 300 horsepower on tap, the M5 could sprint to 60 mph in just 6.4 seconds. This M5 for sale in New York is one of the lowest mileage examples we’ve seen of late and looks factory fresh, with exception of the switch to the Style 21 Throwing Star inserts.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 BMW M5 on eBay

Continue reading this article

1988 BMW M6

You know what the problem with modifying a car from stock is? More than anything, it’s that you’re modifying the car to your taste, and tastes vary just like ice cream flavors. If you’re intending on keeping said car forever, perhaps that’s not a problem – turning a road car into a track car, for example. It’s also not a problem if you’re ridiculously rich and just don’t care who’s downstream of your tastes; the Koenig 560SEC comes to mind. But if your hope is long term collectability, altering the car can have disastrous effects and and seriously change both the desirability of the car and the value in the market. Yesterday’s E28 M5 is a great example; a seller posturing the car as a collector status car when it had many unoriginal details that turned it really from a collector into a good driver candidate. But, at least many of those details were easily reversible – how about today’s similar E24 M6?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 BMW M6 on eBay

Continue reading this article

1988 BMW M5

It’s been awhile since I’ve given any consideration to the E28 BMW M5. Not because they’re aren’t super cool either, they most definitely are, and will be fore the foreseeable future. For that reason I’ve been passing over M5 listings frequently, they’re too in style at the moment. The bubble in which they currently sit isn’t as bad as the 911 or the M3, but I think it’s fair to say that the M5 is over valued. People are snatching these things up left and right, adding them to their collections, and waiting for them reach retirement fund status. That’s a shame because not only does it screw with the market, it means these cars likely aren’t being driven as intended. That was most likely not the case with this example given that it has 190k on the clock. Whereas a potential buyer would hope that the majority of those miles were from easy highway driving, I hope they were were accrued on winding back roads.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 BMW M5 on eBay

Continue reading this article

Face off: 2012 BMW M3 v. 335i

I’ve covered a series of BMW 3 series Individual cars recently, and I seem to be on a streak of finding neat ones. Today for your consideration are two E92s; one 335i turbo with low miles in a nice color combination compared to a M3 Individual with higher miles. The price is nearly the same between the two examples; which would be the one you’d select?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2012 BMW M3 on Craigslist

Continue reading this article

Related Posts with Thumbnails