2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe

The words “Porsche” and “Turbo” are synonymous with “unaffordable” right now, correct? Well, not so fast.

Today we’re looking at a 996 Turbo, which for some time was the most affordable of the blown 911s. Well, “was” is the important word there, as recently several top-tier examples have flown past the $100,000 mark as if it were their 0-60 time. Today’s example bucks that trend with a $40,000 asking price, but still looks great in Polar Silver Metallic over classic black leather. You can probably guess why it’s cheap, but let’s take a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe on eBay

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1973 Volkswagen SP2

Volkswagen do Brasil’s attempt to revise the Karmann Ghia Type 14 took two very different directions. Both were based on the 1600 wagon, but they took very different directions. The Karmann Ghia TC looked like a restyled version of the original, while the SP2 looked a bit like a Type 4 and a 928 had a wild child.

‘SP’ referenced São Paulo where the SP and SP2 were produced. The early model had a 1.6 liter flat-4, while the SP2 moved up to a 75 horsepower 1.7 air-cooled flat-4 mounted in the rear. The proportions of the body styling seemed to suggest the opposite though, with the long, low hood and hatchback GT profile looking more like a traditional sports car than any VW had before. Other period designs were borrowed – the Volkswagen 411, the Porsche 924 and Audi’s 100 Coupe S all had similar angles.

Only about 11,300 of these ultra-rare, Brazil-only SP2s were produced. They’re about as legendary as air-cooled VWs get in the U.S., so when one pops up for sale it’s worth a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Volkswagen SP2 on eBay

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2016 BMW M6 Coupe Competition Edition

The third-generation M6 is an interesting beast. Like prior M6s, they were effective mechanical twins of their M5 counterparts. However, the F-Series M6 introduced a new concept – the F06 M6 Gran Coupe – which seemed to follow the marketplace and was reasonably successful. Of course, like the prior E6x generation, there was also the F12 M6 convertible that proved to be popular as well. In total BMW sold the best part of 6,000 examples of them in North America – not a huge market share compared to the M3/4, but still a decent number for a high-end car.

The outsider – and slowest seller – was the M6 coupe. The F13 packed a wallop with a twin-turbocharged V8, and in LCI Competition form it kicked out 600 horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque. But these are some of the rarest models BMW has sold here – 1,619 pre-LCI coupes were sold in North America, and just 474 late examples were imported. Today we’re looking at one of the last brought here, but to add to the rarity it’s not just a Competition model, but it’s a Competition Edition coupe. These were produced to celebrate the end of F13 production as well as BMW’s racing success with the GT3 variant of the car. Production was limited to 100 models, which got special trim in one of two colors – Alpine White or Austin Yellow Metallic, the latter of which we see here. Just 40 were made in this color for the North American market, but despite that, they won’t destroy your bank account:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 BMW M6 Coupe Competition Edition on eBay

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1993 Mercedes-Benz 600SL

Fresh off the craziest Porsche 911 color combo I’ve ever seen, today we have a Mercedes-Benz that is ready to join the party. This 1993 600SL looks innocent enough on the outside, but once you open those doors, the 1990s slap you right in the face. The dealer in Germany is claiming this is a one-off pre-merger AMG and while I’m normally skeptical of any dealer claim, I think I am buying this story. Although that is the only thing I’m buying once you see the asking price. Hold on.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Mercedes-Benz 600SL at V&G Automobile

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2009 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

I think as much as I fantasize about daily driving a Porsche 911 GT3 or at least using it for all my mundane tasks that require driving, it probably isn’t the best idea ever. Outside of the ride being extremely stiff, you plain old just put a bunch of wear on the car doing something any car could do. In a sense, it’s massive overkill. However, you can still can get your 911 fix by being a reasonable person and do what most people do: just buy a Carrera 2. It is still an extremely capable and rewarding sports car, but it’s also tame enough to handle the daily driving duties. Not to mention they are nearly half the price as a GT3 in the same chassis. Today, we might have one of these perfectly daily-driver 911s without spending anywhere near $100,000.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2009 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

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1992 Alpina B10 3.5/1

It’s hard to imagine being the bottom of the totem pole at Alpina, but the 3.5/1 might just be that car. In part that’s because the E34 lineup was so robust, featuring the cool 3.0 Allrad and the Learjet-channeling BiTurbo. When BMW ceased the production of the M30, V8 powered 310 and 340 horsepower 4.0 and 4.6 models replaced the inline-6. In comparison to those headliners, the 254 horsepower B10 3.5/1 seemed like an article more suited for the corner of page 2. However, consider for a moment that the B10 3.5/1’s power numbers were nearly identical to the contemporary super-saloon S38-powered E28 M5 when it was launched and it helps to restore some clarity to the impressiveness of the products rolling out of Buchloe. Today chassis number 520 of the 572 3.5/1s produced is up for sale in Indiana:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Alpina B10 3.5/1 on eBay

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1938 BMW 327 Sport Cabriolet

Pre-War cars aren’t often featured on these pages; for Germany, the number of available machines manufactured before 1939 just isn’t huge compared to some other countries. That’s because in part the image of the modern nation of Germany rising like a Phoenix from the ashes of World War 1 to become a nation of drivers was entirely a construct of the Nazi party. If anything, pre-World War 2 Germany was a nation of riders, as motorcycle ridership far outstripped automobile ownership. Hitler spent considerable resources not only building the Autobahn, but in advertising its success by having cars do loops up and down the road while cameras filmed. By the time the German economy had rebounded to the point where people could actually buy cars and companies had the productive capacity to provide them, material shortages due to rearmament meant established companies like Daimler-Benz and Auto Union – fresh from their victories in international Grand Prix races – could not deliver cars to meet the demand. Imagine how it was for an upstart company like BMW, then, who struggled to put together a race program based upon its sporting 328. Yet achieve success it did; while BMW failed to get the headline attention of the Silver Arrows, the 328’s success drove sales of the more pedestrian 326 sedan, and the 327 cabriolet model which was derived from it. Light, nimble and quick, they were driver’s cars in the great tradition BMW has come to be known for since. But since only around 1,400 were manufactured in Germany before the War and how many survive today is far short of that number, they’re pretty rare to see today. And, generally speaking, if you want to get into a nice one your bank account better have a quarter million dollars that you’re ready and willing to part with. Today’s example is a lot cheaper than that, but it’s also in need of some freshening – and it’s not completely original. Let’s take a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: on eBay

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1964 Mercedes-Benz 220SEb Coupe

I’ll put almost any Mercedes-Benz from the golden era of the 1960s up against other car from that time period and say it was better. There is a very distinct feeling when you open the doors to one of these cars and it usually says to you “this feels different.” Everything is heavier, thicker, and more robust. Plastic? Very little if any. This is a car made of wood, leather, and steel. You pilot them as much as you drive them. Chances are, it is going to outlast you if cared for properly. Today, we have one of those cars.

This is a 1964 Mercedes-Benz 220SEb coupe. That unofficial lowercase ‘b’ is very important as it signifies this is a fuel-injected inline-six car rather than a twin-carb of the standard 220SE. Not that the dual carbs are bad, but rather the fuel-injection system is much easier to live with and of course much smoother. This car in Chicago is finished in a wonderful shade of red with the matching hubcaps, a black leather cabin, and that all-important wood instrument cluster binnacle. Just to add some more goodness, it’s a sunroof example as well and has a four-speed manual gearbox. What isn’t to like?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1964 Mercedes-Benz 220SEb Coupe on eBay

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1992 Alpina B6 2.8/2 Sedan

The Alpina B6 continued from the E30 generation in the new E36 chassis in 1991, while the last of the prior generation cars were still in US showrooms. Alpina took the basic M50 and shape of then-top-of-range 325i and upped the ante; they bored the displacement to 2.8 liters, stuck Mahle pistons, a special exhaust, Bilstein shocks, 17″ wheels, and the normal assortment of aerodynamic tweaks and interior details to create the B6 2.8/2, which could be had in coupe or sedan form. With 240 horsepower on tap, it offered M3-level performance two years before the E36 M3 debuted.

While these are the least potent of the E36 Alpina variants, they’re still quite special and very rare – just 40 coupes and around 180 sedans were produced before the B6 3.0 replaced it in mid 1993. Today’s example comes from Japan and is chassis number 11.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Alpina B6 2.8/2 Sedan on eBay

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Winter Project: 1995 Audi Sport 90 quattro

The 90 quattro was long derided as underpowered compared to the competition, but in ’93 that was at least partially rectified with the addition of the 2.8 V6 motor. Though the power output wasn’t outrageous at 172, it was a robust and torquey motor that was easier to run around town than the peaky 7A 20V. Change from the B3 to B4 chassis also included substantial revisions outside, giving the 90 a new lease on life. They were well built, well engineered cars and have stood the test of time very well. Unlike their E30 ix competition, the B4 quattros were manual only. On their way out (to be replaced by the mechanically similar A4), the 90 got a special package in the “Sport 90”. Renamed from the previous 90CS models, externally there was only a subtle change to body-color side molding on the Sport models. Available in either front drive or quattro configuration, the latter included Jacquard quattro-script cloth that helped to set it apart from the regular 90s. This one is rough around the edges and needs work, but looks worthy of saving and it’s quite cheap:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Audi Sport 90 quattro on eBay

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