2011 Audi A4 2.0T quattro 6-Speed

Back in 2021 I took a look at a bit of a rare package – it bordered on “didn’t know you could still get those” level. Strange, but true – manual gearboxes were being phased out of Audi’s lineup much more quickly than BMW. So it was a treat to find an A4 with a 6-speed manual:

2011 Audi A4 2.0T quattro 6-Speed

As I explained in that post, by 2011 you could get the A4 in either Avant or sedan, front-drive or quattro, with only the 2.0T rated at 211 horsepower. Like the 2021 car, today’s example is also a manual and also has the 18″ Sport Package, which gave you eponymous 18″ wheels, sport suspension, and front sport seats. This one also has some go-fast goodies, and it still looks pretty modern for an 11-year-old car:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Audi A4 2.0T quattro 6-Speed on eBay

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1991 Audi Coupe Quattro

This B3 sold for $4,150 on May 13, 2022.

Time to consider another Audi icon – the Coupe Quattro. Of course, it was quite hard to follow the original act, but in Europe alongside the RR Quattro 20V was the all-new B3 generation S2. Performance was about par between them, but they had intensely different characters. The new car was safer, quieter, more round, and a lot more practical – while the original Quattro had always looked like it had a hatchback, it was the successor that actually had one.

Of course, in the U.S. we didn’t receive the S2. The Coupe Quattro made due with a thoroughly upgraded 2.3 liter DOHC 20V motor – the 7A. Deep in the middle of the recession and not fully recovered from Audi’s 60 Minutes debacle, the very expensive Coupe Quattro sold slowly. A total of approximately 1,700 of them were imported at over $30,000 each. Considering the cost, the performance was rather soft; the heavy Coupe sported only 164 horsepower and though it was smooth and reasonably quick on the highway, off-the-line performance was lackluster at best. Still, though the internet fora would have you believe otherwise, performance between the U.S.-spec Coupe and original Quattro was pretty similar.

Options on the Coupe were limited to the Cold Weather package, 8-way power seats, and Pearlescent White Metallic paint – two of which are seen here on this Tornado Red ’91. ’91s also had the upgraded glass moonroof rather than the early steel panel, though they lost the infamous “Bag of Snakes” tubular header early models carried. ’91s also gained rear sway bars and are the rarest of the bunch, with only 364 sold in the model year and a further 58 traded as leftovers. This one is probably more of a project than most would want to take on, but let’s take a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi Coupe Quattro on eBay

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2002 Audi S8

The D2 Audi S8 is one of the very rare models from the company that not only excites fans within the marque, but indeed automotive enthusiasts in general. That’s pretty strange for a sedan that most non-enthusiasts would probably not give a second thought to; it’s not a rakish coupe, it doesn’t have a million horsepower, and it doesn’t even have very modern tech. But thanks to a very notable movie appearance and its understated good looks as well as solid performance, the S8 is still a car that draws universal praise.

Some 20 years old now, these models are on the verge of being considered “antique” in many states. Yet they still look pretty modern, the clean design hiding its age well – especially considering that at in eight months it will be 30 years since the ASF hit the show circuit. Let’s take a look at this Brilliant Black ’02 up for sale in Florida.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Audi S8 on eBay

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1992 Audi 100CS quattro Avant

Though it was instantly recognizable as an Audi, the all-new-for-’92 C4 bore little resemblance to the boxy C3 it replaced. Fluid lines and curves dominated the design, while new running gear and motors made a splash in performance. The C4 continued to stress Audi’s pioneering aerodynamic tradition, but the result this time was a car which seemed far less top-heavy than the chassis it replaced. It looked more trim even if it was a bit bigger than the outgoing model.

On the fly, the 100’s new motivation was a revelation. The 2.8 liter V6 replaced the 2.3 liter inline-5, and though horsepower was only 172 and torque 184, both figures represented a nearly 30% gain over the 5-pot. New, too, was a 4-speed automatic transmission. And while the inside looked little different from the last of the C3, only switchgear was shared and the C4 brought a host of new safety and convenience features to the large-chassis Audi.

Strange, though, was the re-appearance of Audi’s earlier naming convention in the US. Back in the early days of the 5000, Audi had used the “S” and “CS” monikers to denote turbo and quattro models at times (but, again being Audi, inconsistently). Well, the S and CS were back after a four-year hiatus. Base model 100 came with steel wheels, while the “S” model stepped you up in options and gave you alloys. But outside of the 20V turbo S4 model, the 100 to get was still the 100CS, which was the most loaded and gave you the option for Audi’s quattro drivetrain. Fully loaded, they were around $35,000 – not cheap, but also not the most expensive in class, and were still pretty unique in offering all-wheel drive. But like the C3, the front-drive 100/100S/100CS outsold the quattro model by a fair margin and are more common to find still kicking today. Audi claims they traded just 2,230 of the new 100CS quattro in 1992, only portion of which were wagons, so let’s take a peek at this Avant:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Audi 100CS quattro Avant on eBay

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1991 Audi V8 quattro Evolution

Evolution. That word sparks joy for a whole sect of automotive enthusiasts, whether they be of the Japanese Lancer-loving type or in the 90s German realm. It was in that time that we had Evolution models delivered from BMW, Mercedes-Benz, and Audi to homolgate equipment to use in the DTM. While the M3 and 190E 2.3-16 took most of the laurels, a fair amount of DTM fans forget that it was the V8 quattro – replete with wood trim – that took the 1990 ( Hans-Joachim Stuck) and 1991 (Frank Biela) crowns before its flat-plane crankshaft was deemed illegal.

In 1991 Audi introduced an Evolution model, which sprouted adjustable front and rear spoilers. That was pretty much the only dynamic change, but these Evolution models were also equipped with 17″ Bolero wheels for good measure. A claimed 500 were produced, but good luck finding them – they are more elusive than essentially every other Audi model in the modern era. One turned up for sale in Berlin, though – and despite the DTM laurels and Evolution nameplate, they’re surprisingly affordable:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi V8 quattro Evolution on Mobile.de

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2002 Audi Allroad quattro 2.7T

Audi’s C5 allroad wasn’t the first tall all-wheel drive wagon to hit the market; AMC claimed that crown with the Eagle well before Audi’s Quattro even hit the market. But it somehow defined the luxury do-anything segment and was unique in the German marques; Audi brought massive amounts of computational power, height-adjustable air suspension, a wide-body flare kit, twin-turbocharged power and even a manual gearbox. It was awesome. It was popular. But, it broke so much that even MacGyver was left stranded.

Still, find a nice one and these offer a lot for relatively short money. They’re quick, comfortable, and capable. As long as you’re willing to do some wrenching and order lifetime warranty parts from FCP Euro, they can be made reasonably reliable. And there is still a pretty avid community of supporters, though truth told nice examples are dwindling in number.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Audi Allroad quattro 2.7T on eBay

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1990 Audi Coupe Quattro

With only around 1,700 imported over 30 years ago, your odds running across an Audi Coupe Quattro any day of the week are…well, exceedingly low. With a sweet 7A 20V inline-5 under the hood, robust build quality, just enough creature comforts, and Audi’s legendary quattro all-wheel-drive system underneath you, there’s a lot to like if you do find one. I took a look at a nice example back in December:

1990 Audi Coupe Quattro

It was not for the faint of heart, with bidding in the mid-teens. Today’s example is a bit more affordable, if you’re looking for one of these:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi Coupe Quattro on eBay

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2008 Audi A8L 4.2 quattro Sport

Back in September 2021, I took a look at a very pricey and pretty rare Audi A8 – the W12 long-wheelbase model:

2009 Audi A8L W12 quattro

Well, if you wanted a more affordable version of this car, which stickered at an eye-watering (at least for Audi) $120,000 base price, you could get the still pretty punchy 4.2 model. These rang in some $50,000 less than the W12, but still offered 350 horsepower on tap, the same looks, and most of the same luxuries. You could opt in for some nice equipment, as well – including the Sport Package. It cost $4,000, but it gave you a lot of equipment…20″ Seven double-spoke alloy wheels with 275/35 R20 summer performance tires, adaptive air suspension, and a three spoke multifuction leather sport steering wheel with shift paddles. The $3,300 Premium Package added in parking assistance, window shades, and a power trunk functions, and this one was also ordered with four-zone climate control – on top of the plethora of standard features. For a bit under $80,000, then, you had a really impressive looking sedan with a boatload of space and luxury. What do these set you back today?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Audi A8L 4.2 quattro Sport on eBay

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1984 Audi 4000S quattro

The 1984 Audi 4000S quattro is a bit of a unique beast. Though it appeared for all intents and purposes identical to the 4000S Limited Edition from the same year, underneath the two shared little in common. Indeed, when you lifted the covers much more of the quattro model was shared with its bigger brother, the exotic Quattro – the so-called ‘Ur-Quattro’ by fans. Herein lies part of where things get confusing in Audi history, since the actual development mules for the boxflared rally wonder utilized the 4000 (née 80). You could make a pretty convincing argument that the small sedan was the original, but that’s neither here or there at this point and is generally semantics (though, it’s occasionally nice to splash the waters of reality on enthusiast’s ill-informed fires of unshakable belief). Whoever was technically first, there’s no denying that the 4000/80 model brought the idea of permanent all-wheel drive to a much more affordable market of rally-bred enthusiasts who eagerly snapped up the roughly 4,500 examples of the first year model. Radical-looking changes came for the 1985 model year with a thorough refresh, and there are those who love both generations with equal aplomb. Admittedly, I’m a fan of the post-’85 models, sometimes referred to as the ‘sloped grill’ cars. But you don’t have to go far to find fans of the more square ’84 model. One reader of ours tasked me with the goal a few years back of keeping an eye out for a clean ’84. Easy, right? Not so fast!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Audi 4000S quattro on eBay

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Rubystone 2001 Audi RS4 Avant

If I’m honest, while I really like the R8…were I going to spend $100k on an Audi, it would be something a bit older and that would stand out. Can anything stand out much more than this car?

That’s right, this is claimed to be a one-of-one Rubystone RS4 Avant, and for good measure it’s got only 25,000 miles. It also seems to be a bit upgraded with lowered suspension and AP Racing calipers. But while the RS4 Andrew looked at seemed to be a good deal, this one…well, it’ll cost you.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Rubystone 2001 Audi RS4 Avant on Mobile.de

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