Restored 1973 Audi LS

Vintage Audis always seem to be more uncommon than their Bavaraian and Stuttgart counterparts, so when this restored Audi LS appeared on eBay, it caught my eye. Introduced in 1968, this was Audi’s largest car since revival of the brand in 1965. Developed in secret against VW management’s wishes, the 100 was a commercial success, so much so that production shifts were added at the Wolfsburg factory, thus making the 100 the first water cooled vehicle produced in the factory.

Here we have a stunning example of the car that put Audi back on the map, replete with the 1.8 liter engine:

The seller states:

I am selling a beautiful 1973 Audi 100 LS, the car was completely restored a few years ago, including a brand new paint job, not the cheap kind, but all trim, glass, door panels, lights were removed, car was repainted in the original arctic blue. There is no Bondo on the car, new windshield and rear glass rubber trim (that is expensive from Germany).

The pictures show the condition of the car, the engine starts right up, new brakes all around, new shocks, new plugs, wires, rotor, points and most importantly no rust. I installed custom made by “Lokari” in Germany front inner fender guards to prevent dirt and moisture from accumulating on top of the headlight bezels (that is a bad rust spot on most of these cars).

The seats, carpets, door panels, headliner are all in great shape, the blue mats are just there to protect the original. The car has an alpine radio with CD player. Front and rear retractable seat belts, passenger side mirror also installed on the car, rear defroster. The bumpers are perfect, all chrome also. Everything works as it should, no issues, I drove the car 2800 miles in 3 days, it was a blast. This old car is like the energizer bunny, it keeps on going and going!

This beautiful car would be great to drive around or to show up at your job at an Audi dealership or to place on display at an Audi dealership, that was the car that put the new Audi on the map after Mercedes sold the Auto Union brand to VW in the mid 60’s.

Please ask any questions, I am only selling a few cars to get hopefully the Audi “holy grail” car I have wanted for many, many years! The only defect is a small rock chip on the leading edge of the hood (picture enclosed).

This car will make the new owner very happy. It looks wonderful and runs great, the parts are quite easy to find on the internet. The only upgrade I would do is install a “Pertronix” ignition, just bought one for my 73 Audi coupe, it seems to run just fine. The Pertronix replaces the points with solid state ignition, never have to replace points again.

There is something about light metallic blue colors that always looks good on German sedans. NADA is pegging a high retail value of this car around $1,775. My instinct tells me it will probably pull a lot more, however will still probably however below $5,000. The value of these early Audis, at least from the auctions and sales I’ve seen, tends to lag behind BMWs and Mercedes-Benzes of the era. This is a shame, because this particular 100 is an attractive sedan that is in excellent condition and deserves respect for putting Audi back on the map.

-Paul

Bookmark the permalink.

3 Comments

  1. Can’t resist commenting yet again. My Dad drove a Mustang Mach 1 in Grabber Blue with a 351 for many years.(Till the suspension was about to fall out) He then did something most would not have predicted. He Bought an Audi 100 LS in Green with an automatic. He drove that car a long time till he collided with a truck on the highway. I remember it as being roomy, lightweight and slightly nasal. Not sure how crash worthy they were, but Dad’s passenger suffered a semi permanent leg injury. Neat car.

  2. Hi,
    I am new to this site. How do I know if the vehicle is up for sale/still up for sale and price?
    Thanks
    Regards

  3. Hi Niek,

    I’ve noticed that some of the cars we post for sale do indeed reappear on eBay or Craigslist a few times, but if the post is more than a few months out, we don’t have a way of knowing, unless the seller left contact information in the ad. Hope this is helpful.

    Paul Henriques – Contributing Author

Comments are closed