1982 Porsche 911SC Turbo Look

This 911 is a little bit of a curiosity. It should be of interest to particular buyers and could be a nice opportunity at a unique 911 for reasonable cost, two things that do not always go hand in hand. I’m also specifically interested in what it should cost, but we’ll get into that below.

So what is it? It’s a 1982 Porsche 911SC Coupe with all of the standard 911SC running gear, but with the body, suspension, braking, and interior of a ’88 930. That makes it similar to the M491-equipped Carreras that Porsche made available from the factory, though obviously this one was not built by the factory. An M491 911 can be a pretty expensive purchase. This one shouldn’t be and in that regard provides something different for those who would like a Turbo-look 911, but can’t stomach the high price. It’s definitely in driver level condition, but the engine and transmission have been rebuilt so hopefully it is mechanically sound.

As they say, the devil is in the details and this one definitely will require a knowledgeable person to look it over and insure all of the work was done properly. The current owner has put a decent number of miles on it so hopefully he too can help with those details. If it all checks out, then it should be a fun car.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 911SC Turbo Look on eBay

Continue reading

1997 Mercedes-Benz S600

Last week I checked out an extremely well-kept 1996 Mercedes-Benz S600 Coupe that was probably the nicest example currently for sale. It had a price tag to match, but I argued that it was probably worth it over a cheaper example with a bunch of problems that will seem never-ending if you don’t stay on top of them. Today, I wanted to check out the brother S600 up for sale in Brooklyn, NY sedan with triple the mileage but surprisingly a higher price. Truth be told, this S600 painted in the rare Green Black Metallic has been up for sale for a while and it probably has to do with the price tag but curiosity got the best of me so I really wanted to take a look at this M120-powered sedan.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Mercedes-Benz S600 on eBay

Continue reading

1965 Porsche 356C 1600 SC Coupe

A couple of weeks back I posted a Champagne Yellow 1969 911E that looked reasonably good, but definitely was in need of some work. The exterior color was a bit muted and didn’t really hint at the way it can shine. That problem is entirely solved on this 1965 Porsche 356C 1600 SC Coupe, located in New York, with Dark Green leatherette interior and a little over 61K miles on it.

This 356 has been fully restored and provides a clue as to how we could expect that 911E to look (at least on the outside) were it too to undergo a restoration. The paint shows much brighter and deeper, though it’s still a softer yellow rather than one of the very bright yellows in the Porsche catalog. The dark green interior makes for a very interesting contrast. Not only would I not normally consider green as an interior color, but I’m not sure I’d ever think to pair it with a yellow exterior. It makes for a lively combination though, which we can really see in the interior where the two colors come together along the dash. It’s definitely unusual, but also quite pretty.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1965 Porsche 356C 1600 SC Coupe on eBay

Continue reading

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition

Update 5/25/18: After apparently selling in mid 2016 for $9,500, this rare 1988 924S Special Edition is back on the market with a new seller, 1,400 more miles and a much higher price – now it’s listed for $15,475.

Why the enthusiast world hasn’t thoroughly warmed up to the Porsche 924S is a bit beyond me, and that’s especially true of the 1988 model year. Not only was compression slightly up resulting in 160 horsepower channeled through the rear wheels, but Porsche also signed the model out with a fantastic lightweight special. The 924S Special Edition was also marketed in Europe as the 924S Le Mans; limited to 500 copies in each market, the U.S. models were black only. In classic Porsche “add lightness” style, the 924S SE had manual windows, no air conditioning or sunroof, and they even dropped the passenger mirror off the car. While power didn’t increase, the car did get more suspension in the M030 factory Koni suspension and wider ‘Phone Dials’ in the back with integrated mud flaps. Also lightweight was the interior fabric, which was so thin it doesn’t seem to be able to actually cover the seats even on a low mileage example like this:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition on eBay

Continue reading

1993 Audi V8 quattro

Recently we got treated to a rare 1991 Audi V8 quattro 5-speed to ponder. Though it had nearly 190,000 miles, it certainly looked to be in pretty good shape. At first glance, $6,500 for one of these complicated older Audis sure seems outrageous and (in many ways) is, but considering the rarity it wasn’t outlandish to see that price.

The manual left the V8 quattro option list in 1992, but to make up for it there were quite a few upgrades. Chief among these was the new ABH 4.2 liter unit. The increase in displacement netted 276 horsepower and 295 lb.ft of torque; though they were far from light and all mated to the 4-speed automatic here, the 92-94 models were far from slow. A revised exhaust now had tips that came straight out, and while the rolling stock looked the same on the forged BBS RG wheels, the suspension uprights brakes changed to be shared with the S4 – no more floating rotors. Inside there were minor changes to the dashboard, dual airbags, a transmission cooler and the revised climate control unit shared with the C4, along with standard Connolly leather. The sticker price rose accordingly to nearly $60,000.

Perhaps it was turbocharged manual S4, with its modern design, that steered customers away from the V8. Or perhaps it was competition outside of the marque. Regardless, few of these 4.2 V8s sold; 270 1992s, 170 1993s and a scant 78 ’94s left dealerships. Late V8s are hard to find twenty five years on, especially in clean condition:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Audi v8 quattro on Minneapolis Craigslist

Continue reading

2016 Porsche 911R

The announcement that the 911R would be making its return was met with plenty of excitement. The iconic R hadn’t been seen since the ’60s and while there have been plenty of cars to wear an RS badge there’s still something about that R by itself that denoted something of importance. In this case, that importance also meant a fairly limited allocation (991 in total) and all were snapped up quite quickly by those who were offered the opportunity of purchasing one. Essentially a GT3 RS with manual transmission and no wing, the R promised to be the understated driver for those who didn’t necessarily prioritize ultimate lap times, but still wanted the most Porsche could offer in naturally aspirated form.

Like many of Porsche’s smaller production track models it didn’t take long for the R to pop up for sale by those hoping to immediately capitalize on its rarity and the difficulty of getting on the short list of initial buyers. Prices were very high and while they have gradually come down they remain very high. With the R the uniqueness of a particular car matters. It matters now and it will matter down the road. If you’re going to spend all of this money on a car that will spend most of its time being looked at rather than being driven, then it needs to have parts to look at that will set it apart.

While it doesn’t have a classic PTS color, this 911R does come with a few stylistic alterations that should accomplish that goal. Do you like orange accents? If not, this isn’t the R for you. If you do, then this one should provide what you need.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Porsche 911R on eBay

Continue reading

1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

I will admit high prices on cars will almost always attract my attention. Or I guess I should say relatively high prices, meaning an obviously high price for that year and model. Those prices stoke my curiosity. I wonder what is so special about them that such an asking price would even be suggested. Unusual colors, interior, very low mileage? Maybe that’s part of the point. Without the very high price I might not take extra notice. After figuring why the price is so high my interest then turns to whether it might actually sell for such a price. That element of curiosity mostly is instructive rather than anything of particular interest, but it can be helpful nonetheless.

That is more or less why we are here and why I’m featuring this Cassis Red Metallic 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe with Burgundy interior. Cassis Red is a very nice color that works well on the 3.2 Carrera’s lines so I likely would have been drawn to this 911 regardless of the price. But the very high asking price caught my eye almost as quickly as the color.

So why such a high price? Because this Carrera has a mere 7,700 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on Classic Driver

Continue reading

1991 Mercedes-Benz 300SE

A few months ago I checked out a great W126 Mercedes-Benz 300SE painted in the rare Willow Green with just 66,000 miles. As you can see, another W126 300SE in, you guessed it, another cool color happen to pop up for sale. This 1991 happens to have almost twice the mileage and reside on the total opposite side of the country, but the condition remains just as nice and maybe even a tad better. The price? I’m really surprised this one is even still for sale.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Mercedes-Benz 300SE on eBay

Continue reading

1991 Volkswagen Golf Country

I was in Stuttgart in 1998 when what I thought was someone’s version of a good joke rolled by me. It was a dark green Mk.2 Golf; not particularly abnormal since they were still mostly less than a decade old and Germans notoriously care for their cars better than most other nations. However, it was about a half-foot taller than it should have been, equipped with some cool looking Speedline wheels, brush guards and a spare tire mounted to the rear. Germans have an odd sense of humor, so it seemed to fit that this was one mullet short of a Hasselhoff Fan Club. I had no idea that I was looking at a factory model; remember, this was in the infancy of the internet and as an American, knowledge of every single European model of the Mk.2 was hard to come by. But the “Country” graphic scrolled down the side gave me a clue, and after some research I found out that this was more than just a one-off.

Though the idea sounds simple enough since parent company Audi had an all-wheel drive system that was ever so popular, mounting that longitudinal transmission and drivetrain into the transverse engine Golf was impossible. Instead, Volkswagen contracted Steyr-Daimler-Puch to design a viscous coupling setup for the Golf with a new independent suspended rear. Like the contemporary Quantum (Passat) and Vanagon setups, it was dubbed “Syncro”, though outside of all-wheels being driven the three systems shared almost nothing.

The result was a few fan-favorite models. Performance types love the Quattro-inspired Golf Rallye, Golf G60 Syncro and Golf Limited models. But undoubtedly the most recognizable Golf to wear the Syncro badge was the jacked-up Golf Country. Utilizing an already heavily modified Golf Syncro, Daimler-Steyr-Puch installed some 438 unique pieces to create the light offroading Golf way before the Outback was conquered by Subaru. Since new, they’ve always commanded a premium and have been the object of lust for American Volkswagen fans who like to do things just a bit different. Now legal for import, they’re popping up time to time:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Volkswagen Golf Country on eBay

Continue reading

2008 Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren Roadster

I am not going to say the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren is forgotten, but it’s not exactly the first or even 10th car that pops into your mind when someone says ”Supercar.” The SLR isn’t a bad car at all, but rather it gets lost in the admittedly small sea of supercars from the 2000s and on. The performance numbers are good with a 0-60 mph time in the mid-to-low 3 second range and a 0-100 mph run in 7.5 seconds. Mercedes put out the standard coupe as well as some special editions over the eight year production run that gained a little notoriety but today I wanted to look at the SLR Roadster. Normally when you take a supercar and try to make it into a roadster, some of the original design language gets washed away simply because things need to happen to actually make the roof come off and keep the car up to same standard. I think the SLR Roadster did an excellent job of keeping this car as true to the coupe design as possible. Let me explain why.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren Roadster on eBay

Continue reading