1979 Porsche 928

It’s pretty rare these days to come across a virtually pristine early Porsche 928. Why most 928s, especially the early cars, are in such disrepair is somewhat of a mystery. It seems that there is a comparative abundance of nice late ‘70s 930s and other 911 derivations. I think that part of the reason lies with the fact that 928 values have remained so low for such a prolonged period of time that owners couldn’t financially justify the costs associated with maintaining them. Well, this example (along with a few other early cars that have sold recently) gives me hope that early 928s are finally starting to get some of the recognition they deserve. After all, it was a very significant Porsche at a very interesting and somewhat tumultuous time for the company. Anyhow, I digress and will segue into a discussion about this particular car for sale in The Netherlands.

This car is one of the nicest early 928’s that I’ve ever seen come up for sale. It is said to have only 13,800 kilometers (around 8,500 miles) and to be a one-owner car. The color combo is beautiful. The Gran Prix white exterior compliments the 928 very well, and goes well with the very striking orange and black interior. It is very well optioned for an early 928, and is equipped with an automatic transmission, automatic seats, and a sunroof. For those who aren’t well familiar with the early cars, most didn’t have sunroofs and unlike later 928’s, most came with manual transmissions.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 Porsche 928 at Car World Classics

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Wednesday Wheels Roundup

Time for another edition of Wednesday Wheels and another peek around the interwebs looking for some neat wheels. This week we have a rare set of Remotec intended for Mercedes-Benz models from the 1980s; they’d look great on a period 500SEC in my mind. Next are a very odd set of Crimson twin-wheels intended for Porsche 911s, apparently. Why? Great question. Redeeming myself partially, I have a set of OZ-made Carlsson wheels that are simply stunning. They’d really look fantastic on an Audi S4 or E500. Finally, rounding things out are a set of Rays Gram Light wheels originally bought for an Audi S4. They’re an unusual choice but mimic the original Quattro’s Ronal R8s. Which are your favorite?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Remotec 5×112 16×8 Wheels on eBay

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2008 BMW 750Li

Check out that booty! Not all that bad right? That’s because the post LCI (Life Cycle Impulse) E65 7 Series was far better looking than the early “Bangle Butt” models. The ’05-’08 cars had larger more rounded grills, completely re-styled headlights and they got rid of the god awful light strip on the trunk as well. Inside the changes were not as apparent, most of them addressed quality concerns, though they still didn’t fix the much maligned iDrive system. In addition to featuring an outdated, clunky navigation unit, this final year E65 750Li features a 4.8L V8 that gets sub par fuel economy. The motor produced 360hp/360 lb-ft of torque which would be fine if the thing didn’t weigh in at 4,905 lbs. At this point you might be asking yourself why I’m writing this car up given all these negative aspects. Well despite it being a gas guzzling beast with archaic tech, I still think these cars, this one in particular, represent a great value in the used luxury market.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 BMW 750Li on eBay

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1992 Audi S4

I’ve started a few discussions about the Audi C4 and the relative lack of good examples that pop up. This is especially true when they’re compared to the models that the S4 originally competed in the marketplace against; the M5 and the 500E. While neither are generally spring chickens when it comes to the used car markets, it’s not very hard to find an excellent example of virtually any day. The same can’t be said for the original S4. The 1992 Audi S4 is arguably the hardest to come by, and for some enthusiasts it’s the most desirable. Sales numbers and enthusiast’s accounts of how many ’92s were sold seem to vary; the general number of ’92s imported is often claimed at 250, but Audi’s sales numbers from 1992 claim some 907 Turbo models were sold (though, that number could include leftover 200 20V and 200 Turbo models). While the later S6 and A6, externally, weren’t visually much different, the earlier S4 stood apart from the regular 100 with ellipsoid headlamps and the then-massive 16×8 Fuchs forged alloys. 1992 models sported the lower, closer to European-spec suspension and a rear sway bar, but there were other, smaller changes – ’92s had steel sunroofs, for example, and “quattro” script rear defrosters that disappeared in ’93. Then there were really small changes; like the V8 quattro, ’92s had the “high intensity” wash system for the windshield – dropped in ’93, along with the S4 badge on the right of the trunk. In ’93, it would move to the left, and “quattro” was added to the right to fall in line with other models. 1992 models were still R12 air conditioned, so upgrading to R134 is common. The seller is correct that ’92s interiors had Elm wood trim, where later models would switch to carbon fiber, then Walnut. ’92s also had a trip computer with digital boost gauge and an ABS-disable switch, which also would be removed from the lineup in 1993. Finding a clean example of these ’92s, then, for some enthusiasts represents the Holy Grail of U.S. bound S-cars. And this example, in the signature Pearlescent White Metallic with black leather, is arguably one of the best we’ve seen:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Audi S4 on eBay

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1979 BMW 323i

BMW’s recent advertisement campaign for the 3-series has notably featured the E21; interesting, since it’s the first time that I can remember BMW actually acknowledging the first 3. It’s not that the E21 didn’t have the right recipe; Paul Bracq’s design was lovely and of course coupled to the traditional front-engined, rear-drive platform with a manual gearbox, but I think that a large part of the E21’s problem was the perceived lack of sport for the 320 model that came here. If you were in the rest of the world, you could get a hotter and better looking option than what Americans would enjoy – the 323i. With the fuel injected M20 motor under the hood, the 323i enjoyed a healthy 20 horsepower bump over the standard 320i, and since it was a Euro car it had better looking….well, it goes without saying. The slimmed down and beefed up 323i made it here through the grey market, with this particular example having the added interesting bit of history of having been imported by notable BMW specialists Hardy and Beck:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 BMW 323i on eBay

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