1983 Mercedes-Benz 380SEC

There is something really satisfyingly to me about about a car finished in a great shade of green. It is easily my favorite color if I have the choice, so when a great classic Mercedes-Benz shows up in a unique shade, you take a closer look. This 1983 380SEC is finished in Cypress Green Metallic over a very period-correct Brazil Beige cloth interior. It shows just 65,000 miles and thankfully looks every bit the part. However, this one comes with price tag more fit for a 560SEC.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1983 Mercedes-Benz 380SEC on eBay

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2011 Porsche 911 Targa 4

I’ve mentioned this before – but unless you have a keen eye, the 993, 996, and 997 Targa models don’t exactly scream “Hey, I’m a Targa!”. They all used very complex glass roofs with a hatchback-style piece that can be helpful in some situations. Still, these models have a far contrast to the return of the Targa panel that we saw with the 991. For the 997 chassis, all the Targa cars were built on the Carrera 4 body, which of course meant all were all-wheel drive. Just 1,760 were produced worldwide, with only 800 coming to America. This 2011 Targa 4 up for sale outside of Philadelphia is finished in the wonderful color of Racing Green Metallic over a Sand Beige interior; however, it is not cheap.

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1963 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia Type 34

The Type 34 Karmann Ghia was a sales failure – it was too expensive – costing about 50% more than a normal Type 14 Ghia. But that didn’t mean it wasn’t a very good looking failure. While the underpinnings were shared with its less exotic 1500 cousins, the upscale Karmann Ghia was aimed squarely at making peasants feel like landed gentry and certainly looked the part. Sweeping character lines ran the length of the car, giving it its signature ‘razor’ nickname. Added to the upscale look in terms of desirability today is rarity. Never imported to the United States, Type 34 production only achieved about 42,500 units – less than 10% of the total number of the more popular and familiar Type 14 Karmann Ghia. Today’s light green example is great to see:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1963 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia Type 34 on eBay

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2002 Audi S6 Avant

One of the more captivating baffling options in the used performance wagon market must surely be the C5 Audi Allroad. Despite the reputation for 100% metaphysical certitude that they’ll fail – probably catastrophically, they’re fan favorites. Often as a retort to internet commentaries that they’re not reliable, actual owners will chime in, demanding respect and steadfastly assuring the audience that the Allroad’s reputation is undeserved.

It’s been 100% reliable!’ they’ll insist.

Of course, the recipe to actually make it reliable involves major reworking of the engine and suspension. And, sometimes the electronics, too. On top of that, it turns out that various people’s definition of ‘reliable’ varies greatly – especially for Audi owners. Basically, to be deemed ‘unreliable’, an Audi must first assassinate a major public figure, then make a Star Wars reboot featuring only Jar-Jar Binks, then kneel during the National Anthem (easy to do, as most have failed suspension on at least one corner), perhaps call someone the wrong personal pronoun, and finally do the action sequence out of a Michael Bay Transformer movie when you turn the key. If, and only if, those conditions are met will fanatics finally fail to reply to the assertion that the Allroad just isn’t a reliable car.

But, it’s cool. And so you probably want one, even though you know it’ll bankrupt you. So the smart way to buy an Allroad is to not buy an Allroad – you should buy an S6 Avant, and in particular, this S6 Avant.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Audi S6 Avant on eBay

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2017 BMW M760i xDrive

There aren’t many times that you can say that the cheapest of a given thing is still unbelievably impressive. That, though, is the case with the M760i xDrive. In 2017, this was the least expensive V12-engined car you could buy. That didn’t make it cheap at a nearly $160,000 base price, and it also didn’t mean BMW skimped on options – or, by any means, power. The M760i has a twin-turbocharged 6.6-liter V12, after all, and it makes 601 horsepower and 590 lb-ft of torque. Coupled with the ultra-quick-shifting ZF 8-speed auto and xDrive, this car is quick for a sports car – never mind a luxury apartment. Despite weighing in at over 5,000 lbs, the car can scoot to 60 in 3.4 seconds and do the standing quarter mile in 11.7 at over 120 mph. Unreal. Now, you can rail against BMW’s use of the M badge everywhere not M, but if there’s one car that might be deserving of it, it’s this one. Performance was, of course, also only part of the story, as this car also has every option you could pretty much want in a luxury sedan. And predictably, despite being just a few years old the values on these have quickly fallen:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2017 BMW M760i xDrive on eBay

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2001 Porsche 911 GT2 Clubsport

If you thought the 996 Porsche 911 GT2 was the final boss as one of the last “windowmaker” 911s, let me introduce the 911 GT2 Clubsport. Just 70 Clubsport-optioned 996 GT2s were produced, all for Europe, and were equipped with a roll cage, Recaro racing seats with six-point harnesses, a fire extinguisher, and a battery cut-off switch. Basically, this was a track-ready example without all the work of sourcing the parts. This one made its way to the US via a lengthy by renowned specialists JK Technologies of Baltimore, and is now up for sale in everyone’s favorite playground: Miami, Florida.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Porsche 911 GT2 Clubsport on eBay

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1993 Mercedes-Benz 300SE

We’ve come a long way in the past 30 years when it comes to cars. Arguably the best car in the world at the time, the Mercedes-Benz S-Class, offered everything in terms of quality and functionality – but you had to pay dearly for it. Now almost 30 years later, you get all that plus a host of autonomous-like driving features in a basic family sedan. Such is the march of time and progress, but we still like to take a look at the cars that created the trend – and this W140 is the perfect candidate.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Mercedes-Benz 300SE on eBay

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1981 Porsche 924 Carrera GTS Clubsport

One of the more surprising models ever to leave Stuttgart was the 924 Carrera GTS Clubsport. Yes, Porsche made a track-ready racer 924 that was originally destined as a homologation model for FIA Group 4 racing. It was a 924 Turbo with aluminum body panels, 16″ Fuchs wheels, 930 Turbo-style brakes, Bilstein coilover suspension, an integrated roll cage, plastic window treatments, 935-style seats, and a fire suppression bottle. Also it looked really menacing compared to the standard 924 Turbo. Only 15 road-legal cars were produced, which puts this in the rarest of the rare category when talking about the special cars from Porsche. Today, we happen to have one for sale up for sale in Miami with a crazy 37,000 miles on the odometer. Although that maybe isn’t so crazy after I tell you the price.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1981 Porsche 924 Carrera GTS Clubsport on eBay

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1975 BMW 3.0CSL Batmobile Group 2/4 Replica

Back in June I took a look at the roadgoing version of the CSL ‘Batmobile’ – well, at least a replica of one:

1971 BMW 2800CS ‘Batmobile’ Replica

I talked about the race exploits of the FIA and Touring racing cars, and today we’re looking at a replica version of one of those.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1975 BMW 3.0CSL Batmobile Group 2/4 Replica on eBay

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1982 Alpina C1 2.3

The E21 generally remains the affordable classic in the 1970s to 1980s BMW range, being undervalued when compared to many of the E10s and E30s. It has all the right ingredients for the BMW faithful, too – especially in little six European trim. The 323i looked like a scaled down 6-series and it effectively was, but that doesn’t make it in any way unattractive. Alpina, too, had their had in this model, producing no less than seven variants in a short run. The most popular is the bad boy B6 2.8, but there was a lesser known M20 powered C1 2.3, too. With 170 horsepower and all the right Alpina details, it’s begging for the attention that it deserves:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Alpina C1 2.3 on eBay

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