1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

A few weeks ago I checked out a 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 that needed some work — a lot of work. Almost every surface of that poor M100-powered W109 needed some kind of attention. The paint was a baked mess, the interior was growing mold at an alarming rate and the mentioned M100 engine was a total unknown if it could actually run or not. Despite all of this, the seller was asking a hefty $14,500 for the privilege of dealing with that literal mess. Today’s car is another 1969 6.3 — although this one is the total opposite of that charity case. But as you might have guessed, this one isn’t going to cost you $14,500. Not even close.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1997 Mercedes-Benz S600 Brabus SV12 7.3S

Some people like to upgrade their cars with aftermarket parts or parts from other vehicles from the same manufacturer. Usually it’s a small part or maybe a set of wheels that satisfies their itch. Other people go a little bigger with maybe custom body work and paint. Then way on another level, we have what was done with this 1997 Mercedes-Benz S600 in Russia. It’s impressive enough to have a Mercedes tweaked by legendary tuner Brabus, that this car is, but it’s a whole other ball of wax once you see what is hiding inside this car and the special surprise hiding in the trunk. Here is a hint: It isn’t subwoofers.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Mercedes-Benz S600 Brabus SV12 7.3S on Facebook

1960 Mercedes-Benz 190SL

This is a new one more me. No, not the gorgeous Mercedes-Benz 190SL, but a car that is so perfect that is actually has its own hardback book with glossy pages showing off how beautiful it is. That is the level of perfect we are dealing with today with this 1960 W121. This isn’t an original time capsule or forget gem that has been buried away for 50 years, this 190SL actually has over 65,000 miles on it. Of course, this roadster has had a full nut and bolt rotisserie restoration done to it and by the looks of it, it wasn’t time or money wasted. Everything about the 190SL is perfection and of course, the price tag reflects that. So how much for all this perfection?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1960 Mercedes-Benz 190SL on eBay

2017 Mercedes-Maybach S650 Cabriolet

Last week I checked out the unfortunate CL550 Cabriolet that made no sense to me in a number ways. Today, we have something that in practice is very similar to that car, but totally on the other end of the spectrum when it comes to quality. This is the Mercedes-Maybach S650 Cabriolet. The ultra-luxury S-Class convertible that rivals the Rolls-Royce Dawn in everything, including price. This Maybach S650 Cabriolet is a S65 AMG Cabriolet that keeps all of its power and adds another level of luxury and most importantly for this car, exclusivity. Just 300 of these cars will be produced by Mercedes and just 75 of them coming to North America. But for this price tag, is it worth it?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2017 Mercedes-Maybach S650 Cabriolet on eBay

2005 Mercedes-Benz E55 AMG with 21,000 miles

Earlier this week I checked out a 1994 Mercedes-Benz E320 Cabriolet with just 6,700 miles on it with a price tag on it that had me running the other way. Today, we have another low mileage Mercedes, but this one is a little different style and a lot more power. This is a 2005 E55 AMG for sale in the Bay Area with just a little over 21,000 miles. It’s painted in the awesome Midnight Blue with black leather interior and my favorite trim, Birdseye Black Maple. Now that most of these W211 E55s have passed their 10th birthday, these supercharged sedans haven started to get really cheap compared to their original $75,000 price tag when new. But as for this car? Sadly you won’t be able to snag it up for $11,995. Not even close.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Mercedes-Benz E55 AMG on San Francisco Craigslist

1994 Mercedes-Benz E320 Cabriolet with 6,700 miles

These ultra-low mileage cars always intrigue me in more ways than one. How have they held up after so many years of just sitting? How has the maintenance been handled despite only having a handful of miles a year? But this biggest thing I wonder is was it worth it, literally, to let the car sit and preserve its pristine condition. Today’s car, a 1994 Mercedes-Benz E320 Cabriolet that checks in with a little over 6,700 miles, isn’t your typical used car to begin with. I’ve covered the C124 pretty extensively and we’ve even featured some really nice examples here for sale. But for this 1994 for sale in New York, is it worth the giant price tag for the so little miles?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Mercedes-Benz E320 Cabriolet with 6,700 miles on eBay

2005 Mercedes-Benz SL500 for $9,000

”How cheap can they really get?”

That is what I ask myself all the time when checking out almost any car. I understand why cars get to a certain point, even ones that were really expensive to start with. Sometimes it is just the natural cycle of used cars. Sometimes it is a situation where the car just isn’t worth the trouble and prices hit the floor. Of course this is a case by case basis, but it is always interesting to see how certain cars slot into the market when they’ve matured to over 10 years old. Today’s car, a 2005 Mercedes-Benz SL500, is one of these cases where I always wonder how cheap they are going to get.

The R230 generation isn’t like SLs of years past; this is a modern-era SL with a retractable hardtop and a sleek design. Gone are the square slabs and lightweight feel, this is a bloaty, heavy grand tourer. Of course all this came at a very expensive price. The 2005 SL500 started at $92,000 ($118,000 in today’s money) and only got significantly more expensive from there. The thing is, these are pretty stout cars. They aren’t mechanical nightmares like a Land Rover (I know this from personal experience — I own one) and maintenance won’t bankrupt you even if you daily drive one of these. But this SL500 isn’t a mint to get into: it is a mere $9,000. That’s it. No, it doesn’t have a rebuilt title and it’s not full of mold, it is just a 2005 SL500 with a 141,000 miles. This makes me wonder; are all R230s heading towards this level of cheap buy-in?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Mercedes-Benz SL500 on eBay

Roll the Dice? 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

Earlier this week I check out a handsome 1973 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 4.5 that looked to be a great driver and probably not a bad buy for the long run. Today, we have another W109 that has a little bit more risk attached to it. This of course is the king W109, the 300SEL 6.3. I’ve covered these many times before and every time I see one pop up for sale I always try to take a look at them. Unfortunately, this 6.3 needs a lot of help and even more money to make it worth it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 on eBay

1973 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 4.5

I never get tired of a really nice Mercedes-Benz W108/W109. From the 2.5 liter up through the legendary 6.3 and with a bunch of options in between, you can get your fix just about any way you want with them. Honestly, this thing is so handsome it could have a tiny OM615 that makes 55 horsepower and I’d still be happy with it. The square contours on this thing are all sized perfectly but at the same time doesn’t feel like a small car. Despite only having an eight year production run from 1965 to 1973 and pumping out over 380,000 examples, these sedans have stuck around. You can find them in almost every condition for almost every price. Today’s example, a 1972 280SE 4.5 up for sale in California, is one of those better ones.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 4.5 V8 on eBay

2007 Mercedes-Benz CL550 Cabriolet

Some things never change. One of those things just happens to be people cutting the roof off Mercedes-Benz coupes and adding convertible tops. I’m not kidding. They did it with the C126, they did it with the C140 and they did it with the C215. Naturally, they did it with today’s car, a 2007 CL550, up for sale in Florida. Thankfully for everyone, Mercedes started doing it themselves with the 2015 S-Class convertible that looks amazing in my eyes. The biggest problem with these conversions is that they are clunky. Adding a convertible top to a car is no easy feat and those who do it as an afterthought always face an uphill battle. It’s one thing to make everything function smoothly and actually work, but it is a whole other challenge to make it look good. Most of the time when the top canvas is folded down, it creates an ungainly mass of metal and fabric sticking up behind the rear seats. This not only looks bad, but has horrible wind noise and causes visibility problems. Nevertheless, people still do it because people still buy them for whatever reason. As for this specific car? I have a no idea why anyone would ever consider it. Let me explain why.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2007 Mercedes-Benz CL550 Cabriolet on eBay