1974 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa

I don’t get to feature these 911s a lot. That is partly due to there not being a ton of them around these days, but also those few that I do see never seem quite right. They’re either not in great condition or simply priced much too high, and while high prices aren’t typically something to dissuade me from writing up an air-cooled Porsche I usually end up passing them by. They just sit in a funny place in the market.

This one doesn’t seem to possess those issues, though even here where the price is at least somewhat reasonable I think it makes for a pretty tough sell. Here we have a Grand Prix White 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa with Midnight leatherette interior and a reported 68,124 miles on it. These U.S market 2.7-liter Carreras must be distinguished from their much more expensive European counterparts, which shared their MFI engine with the 1973 Carrera RS. Those 911s were basically a Carrera RS Touring with impact bumpers. These 911s are not quite that. However, that lack of a shared pedigree means prices are far lower and while their collector potential also is a good bit lower, pricing is at least such that they can make for a worthwhile consideration for those who desire a ’70s 911.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa on eBay

2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4

In many of my features of newer Porsches the focus has been on the exterior color. Usually one of Porsche’s historic colors selected as a paint-to-sample option. This one isn’t really about the exterior color, even though Lava Orange is quite nice. This one is more about the interior color and the way it combines with that orange exterior. It also has a true manual transmission rather than PDK and that in itself is a rare thing on these new Targas. So I guess we could say that I find the total package here quite appealing even if the individual pieces aren’t incredibly special in their own right. This was a solidly put together Targa and one that remains unique enough to stand out even within the rarefied air of PTS builds.

So what do we have: a Lava Orange 2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4, located in Texas, with a Saddle Brown leather interior, 7-speed manual transmission, and 3,307 miles on it. The interior also features Lava Orange accents through deviated stitching along with painted console and trim pieces. It comes together quite well!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4 on eBay

1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

Rubystone Red (Sternrubin) might be the most love/hate of the well known Porsche colors. I imagine there are colors within Porsche’s extensive catalog that have been less liked overall, but those colors disappear rarely to be asked for again. Rubystone, while we don’t see it very often, does still come around as a PTS option on modern 911s, especially on the limited production high performance models like the GT3 RS and 911 R. And when it does it looks just as stunning as it did upon its debut. A lot of buyers might not like it, but whatever its qualities, on cars that deserve a bold attention-grabbing color it’s a color that performs exactly that function.

Of course, it was on just such a model that it debuted: the 964 Carrera RS. We did not get the Carrera RS in the US market, but rather had to settle for the more tame RS America. With the passing of time it is now legal to import the true Carrera RS and we’ve seen quite a few over the past year or so. Here we have another one, fully restored and looking nearly immaculate, in that eye-popping color of Rubystone Red.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS on eBay

1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe

I am going to return here to a long time favorite of mine: a Slate Grey Metallic 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe with only 23,863 miles on it. Here the Slate Grey Metallic exterior, which is the part of this 964 I most strongly prefer, is contrasted with a Linen interior. I’m not sure I’ve come across a similar example. Most have had Burgundy interiors. If I’m honest, I prefer the Burgundy, but there is something about the brightness conveyed by this Linen interior and I can see how it would be appealing. And unlike many of the Linen interiors we see on either a Cabriolet or a Targa this Coupe should be a little easier to keep clean since it is more insulated from the elements. Both exterior and interior look in nice shape and I think this looks like a nice early 964.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe on eBay

2012 Porsche 911 Targa 4S

Let’s stick with the general theme of the last couple days and continue looking at variations of blue over red. Here we have another fairly interesting version of that combination and one that is quite unique to find on the 997. This is a Dark Blue Metallic 2012 Porsche 911 Targa 4S, located in California, with a full Carrera Red leather interior, PDK, and just 18,136 miles on it. Being a 997 this is the new Targa design (or is it now the old design? Perhaps old-new?) that debuted on the 993 Targa. It showcases a large sliding glass panel rather than the removable central top with integrated roll hoop of previous Targa models. I’ve stated before that it isn’t my preferred Targa design and as most are aware Porsche themselves seem to agree since the 991 has reverted to the original removable roof. I guess we’ll find out in the coming years whether Porsche reverts to the 993 design or sticks with the original. (Or removes the Targa from the lineup entirely.) New design or old, the Targa still provides the same increased openness, but without going to a full Cabriolet, and should have appeal to those that like a bit of sunshine and wind in their hair.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2012 Porsche 911 Targa 4S on eBay

1959 Porsche 356A 1600 Reutter Coupe

I want to turn back the clock from yesterday’s very pretty Aetna Blue over Bordeaux Carrera 4S to see a somewhat similar early example of that color combination. Admittedly, the comparison here isn’t exact since the colors are not precisely the same, but I think we still get a sense of the way these colors work on a vintage Porsche and a sense of the inspiration for that modern example. Here we have a Meissen Blue 1959 Porsche 356A 1600 Reutter Coupe, located in Houston, with a Red leatherette interior. On this 356 the shade of blue is a little lighter and the shade of red is a little brighter. Nonetheless, we end up with an equally pretty Porsche and one that surely would be a prized part of any collection.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1959 Porsche 356A 1600 Reutter Coupe on Classic Driver

2017 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

This is not a car I normally would post. The dealer hasn’t provided us much in the way of description and it’s PDK rather than a true manual, which isn’t typically what I seek out in these cars (though more on that below). However, this color combination is so striking that I simply cannot pull myself away from it. Here we have a situation where two very attractive colors have been combined to produce a result that I think makes each of those attractive colors even better. The exterior is paint-to-sample Aetna Blue, which first originated on the Porsche 356 and is itself a wonderfully elegant and vintage color. The interior is a Bordeaux over Black combination that seems to have just the right amount of each to make the interior look very refined. Bordeaux, itself, already is a fairly refined version of a red interior. When you put these colors together the whole certainly is greater than the sum of its parts. I really like it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2017 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S on eBay

2016 Porsche Boxster Spyder

One last car without a fixed roof. Moving ahead 50 years from the 356C Cabriolet I featured over the weekend we come to possibly the best of Porsche’s open-top machines. From my first glimpse I immediately loved the new design of the 981 Boxster and Cayman when each debuted. While I’d generally liked the Cayman from its inception I cannot say the same of the Boxster. I was fine with it, but I can’t say it ever really wowed me. That feeling remained fairly constant throughout its first 15 years of production until the 981. Porsche finally seemed to have gotten things right. This new design struck the right balance between aggressive styling and elegant looks. It’s a modern Porsche so it shouldn’t be too shouty, but it also should make clear its sporting aspirations.

Like with the Cayman GT4, Porsche also allowed the Boxster to borrow a 3.8 liter flat-six engine from the 911 for the Boxster Spyder. Gone are much of the Boxster’s criticisms about a general lack of performance. 375 horsepower tends to help with that. So does a well-balanced mid-engine chassis with the power directed to the rear. The Boxster always has had a pretty good chassis. Now it had a complementary engine.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Porsche Boxster Spyder at Euroclassics Porsche

1965 Porsche 356C Cabriolet

I’m going to continue with my sunny weather open-top motoring theme and have a couple interesting Porsches to look at highlighting the full breadth of the Porsche range. Whether you want classic or modern, supercar performance or backroad cruiser, there’s probably a Porsche out there to suit your needs.

The one we see here, a Dolphin Grey 1965 Porsche 356C Cabriolet, is going to stretch the bounds of reasonableness when it comes to price, but for those seeking the truest sense of the vintage Porsche experience there may be few better options. This 356, which comes very late in the model’s production, is said to be in entirely original condition showcasing wholly original paint and interior. While I’m not sure it’s spent its whole life with one owner it does sound like its original owner possessed it until very recently.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1965 Porsche 356C Cabriolet on eBay

1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

I have somewhat of an obsession with these cars. There’s obviously a certain degree of obsession that applies to all of us here at GCFSB – whether writers or readers – but I mean this specifically in reference to the 3.0-liter 930. I can’t even really say why that is. I’ve never driven one or sat in one; I’m not sure if I’ve ever even seen one, at least, not any time recently. By all indications from those much more familiar with them than me, the later 3.3-liter 930 is better. It’s more refined, more powerful, and just a generally all around better performer. There also are a lot more of them so prices are much lower for all but the final year model. Yet here I am: show me a ’76 or ’77 930 and I will stop in my tracks to go over the whole thing.

The only thing I can say for sure about this obsession is that I definitely think the earlier whale tail Turbos – rather than those with the tea tray – are better looking. Functional or not, I’ve never really liked the look of the tea tray spoiler, whereas I think the whale tail fits the 930’s lines just about perfectly. The tea tray makes the 930 look clunkier while the whale tail makes it look lighter, which of course it is! If you add the Turbo graphics available at the time, then I’m completely on board. Perhaps someone else will understand this obsession. I don’t know. Either way, here we have another one up for sale and it looks quite good: a Silver Metallic 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera, located in San Diego, with black interior and 40,035 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay