1986 Ruf BTR Porsche 911 Slantnose for sale

Seeing the RUF CTR2 in a Road & Track high-speed shootout in middle school ushered in a new era in my car appreciation – the tuner era. Now much more commonplace, I had never before seen the fantastic excesses of speed possible when aftermarket engineers set their sights on improving the best of the best. Ridiculous power is ubiquitous these days, but while many tuners have eschewed clean aero add-ons for the automotive equivalent of gaudy triple-E silicon implants, Alois Ruf has stayed classy through over three decades of Porsche tuning. Clean proprietary wheels are often the only exterior modification as Ruf lets his engine work do the talking. In the mid-80s, Ruf took the poster-star Slantnose 930 911 and worked his magic, ending up with 374 turbo-charged horses ready to lay waste to the all comers.

1986 Porsche 911 Ruf BTR Slantnose for sale on eBay

Not a lot of info on the listing, but three numbers seem the most important:

100 – The total number of Ruf BTRs produced
12,748 – The obscenely low mileage
123,900 – The asking price

It’s a shame this car has only traveled 13k miles, because I’m sure it’s a blast. It’s tough to judge the market for a car like this, but even with the low mileage and rarity, it seems priced a bit high. That said, the seller seems ready to wait to get their price, so more power to them in passing on this most rare of 911s.

-NR

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8 Comments

  1. Never been a huge Slantnose fan, but the color and wheels gives this car a nice, subtle look.

  2. Paul, I’m with you; the slantnose is aggressive but not pretty. Dig the color though, and have always loved Ruf’s flat, simple 5-spokes.

  3. My favorite feature…the boost dial (Ladedruck)! Was that a feature on other 911 turbos of the era or added by Ruf?

  4. Nice but good documentation is key there are so many copies. Wonder why the seat is so puckered after so few miles. Maybe the owner was Super Size?

  5. Not a huge fan of slantnoses but this one looks right with gorgeous Ruf wheels. But why the 4×4 stance??

  6. The adjustanble boost is a RUF add on its known as the “dial of death”. It got that name for two reasons. First, the lag in these cars is not easy to handle and when you have the boost cranked up you better know what you’re doing and have the car pointed straight when the boost comes on, ask Pelle Lindbergh. Second, if you crank up that boost a lot and often plan on a very short engine life, they’ve been known to blow the rings right off the pistons.

    I have the dial of death in my 89 turbo coupe with RUF mods and even I dont mess with it much.

  7. It’s a 20+ year old car with no mention of what, if any, maintenance was performed. Anyone want to take bets on the condition of the turbo seals and bearings?

  8. >ask Pelle Lindbergh

    Of course, it helps if you’re not drunk, too.

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