2012 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe

I had a dream that one day I’ll own a Porsche. Well, to be fair, I have dreams that I’ll own a lot of cars. But a Porsche is definitely on the short list of “top 1,000 potential cars”, anyway. It probably won’t come as any surprise that I’d like to own something not quite like what everyone else owns. And that brings me to today’s car.

The 997 Turbo was introduced in 2006 and, once again, redefined and raised the benchmark for performance in its category. With the best part of 475 horsepower on tap, it produced nearly 10% more power out of the box than the X50 package had only the prior generation. Porsche being Porsche, that was not enough; in 2009, the car was redesigned and the lighter engine was now up to 493 horsepower. And in 2010, Porsche kicked it up another notch with the introduction of the Turbo S.

The Turbo S had all of Porsche’s cutting-edge technology. Carbon-ceramic brakes, the PDK transmission, torque vectoring; if you could name it, it was on the Turbo S. These cars had 520 plus horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque; pound for pound, these cars were quicker than the supercar Carrera GT had been just a few years earlier. Today, pricing has come down as they’re not the biggest and brightest star anymore, but they still seem pretty special – and this one is just plain gorgeous to me:

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2017 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

If you are going to all-in on bright green, prepare to go all in. The greens that Porsche offered up back in the 1960s and 1970s were not for the shy and judging by the today’s car, it’s still that way. This is a 2017 911 Carrera 4S in paint-to-sample Viper Green and there is certainly no mistaking it. I can see why they called it Viper Green, because in a never-ending sea of cars in earth tones, seeing a car painted this color is like getting bitten by a viper. Okay, maybe that was an extreme comparison, but you get where I am going with this. Judging by the mileage on this car, it seems like the first owner didn’t like to be seen in this one.

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1989 Porsche 911 Carrera

The 1989 model year was the final year of the torsion-bar 911, and only 1,156 US-market Carrera coupes were made. If that number seems low, it is because the 1989 was a split model year, as the 964s were also sold as 1989 models. Given that the 911 basically looked the same from 1974 to 1989, I can’t imagine it was a fun job trying to sell these 1989 911s when new when totally new 964s were sitting in the showroom. Now some 30 years later, most seek these out for the G50 gearbox and special options like the sport seats. They bring a slight premium over the older 911s with the 915 gearboxes, but at the end of the day its all about condition, mileage, and options. This example caught my eye up for sale in Idaho is finished in classic Carrera White with matching Fuchs and blue interior. A fairly nice spec on its own. Mileage? Just under 121,000. So a potential nice driver-quality 911 for a decent price, right? Not so fast.

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2020 Porsche 718 Spyder

I think sometimes I take for granted the freedom Porsche gives us on configuring cars. When it comes down to it, they’ll basically give you anything you want for the right price, and then even more if they really like you. In the modern era of lean manufacturing and just-in-time production, doing one-off builds for customers probably doesn’t make sense on paper. Yet if someone wants “Kills bugs fast.” on a door sill, they’ll do it. It gets even more complicated and time consuming when it comes to interiors with order special leathers then having someone hand-stitch the turn signal stocks. The ROI has to be enormous for Porsche both in profit and customer loyalty to continue this practice in 2020.

However, it is one thing to do it when customers are paying extra for it, and another when doing it on dealer stock cars. This 2020 718 Spyder on a dealer lot in California has a wild Bordeaux Red and black interior that is mirrors the interior of the previous Boxster Spyder nearly 10 years ago. Truth be told, this color combo isn’t for everyone.

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1968 Porsche 912

Oh Porsche 912. Some look at it as a classic Porsche design minus two cylinders, while others think it’s a Volkswagen Beetle in a 911 shell. They certainly went unloved for some period of time as you’ll hear stories of yesteryear about them being in the local classifieds for $9,999. Now? Triple it. Personally, they are what they are. Yeah, a little down on power, but the long hood cars still have a soft spot in my heart. Unfortunately because they were so cheap, lots of ridden hard, modified, or just straight up used examples come to market today. This 1968 up for sale outside of Salt Lake City, Utah certainly looks to be a survivor, but maybe not the cleanest example out there.

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1979 Porsche 924 Turbo

Because it’s an early 1980s Porsche and the model ends with “Turbo”, it must be automatically unaffordable, right? Not so fast. While the air-cooled market has lost some of its forced-induction steam as of late, few would consider the 930s out there “cheap”. But there is still plenty of value in the transaxle marketplace; and from early 928s to the fledgling 924 Turbo, automotive journalists are pegging these cars as the ones to buy before they, too, head upwards.

The 924 Turbo, or 931 internally, was a huge upgrade from the standard 2.0 924. The addition of a KKK K26 turbocharger and 6.5 lbs of boost did the best part of double the power in Europe – even in U.S. trim, an impressive 140 horsepower was available. Yet they developed a reputation as expensive to run and finicky; when later, equally powerful normally aspirated 944s and even more potent 944 Turbos came along with fewer drawbacks, the 924 Turbo fell into relative obscurity. Today, find a good one though, and it’s a recipe for an instant classic collectable:

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2009 Porsche 911 Targa 4S

The 997.2 Porsche 911 Targa was the last of the sliding roof versions that started with the 993 and ended with the intro of the 991 generation that got extremely complicated. Without looking close enough, you can assume that they are just regular coupes and maybe that is what Porsche was going for. If you happen to see one, they are rare. Only about 3,000 997.2 Targas were made, as compared to the 10s of thousands in the regular coupe bodies. This 2009 for sale in Washington is finished in the classic Carrara White with the Cocoa special leather. The perfect daily driver?

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2010 Porsche Cayenne GTS

It certainly seems like the first-generation Cayenne GTS is here to stay as a desirable vehicle. That is rather evident seeing the prices compared to the standard Cayenne and Cayenne S of the same years and things really start getting crazy when talking about a nice GTS with a 6-speed gearbox. The automatics certainly always trade less, but still not what what would I would call “cheap.” Still, if you could buy an SUV around $20,000 and not lose anything in depreciation, would you?

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1995 Porsche 911 Turbo

Wow. That is all I can say about this one. This of course being a 1995 Porsche 911 Turbo finished in Violet Blue Metallic over a Florence Gray leather interior. It is bold both inside and out as you can see, and for some, an ultimate 911. The 993 Turbo has held steady around the $100,000 for the nice examples with some miles, but this one up in Belgium has just under 27,000 miles. Needless to say, this car is not around $100,000. Not even close.

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2008 Porsche 911 GT2

Very few production cars scare me. By “scare,” I mean if you hit the throttle at any reasonable moment, things get very hairy. A few of those cars have the numbers “911,” followed by the letters “GT,” and finally the number 2. The first GT2 for the US market, the 996 GT2, was a car that was probably a little too raw for the general public. If you were cruising along at 65 mph and put your foot to the floor, there is a very high chance the rear end will start to move in directions that you wouldn’t expect. The car doesn’t have traction or stability control, which you think wouldn’t be a problem unless you were driving at the limit, but the limit is very low in a 996 GT2. Or maybe the limit comes up very fast, depending on how you want to look at it.

The next generation and the car we are looking at today, the 997 GT2, thankfully was a tiny bit more tame. It had Porsche Stability Management (PSM), along with traction control to keep you from looking like a baby deer on a frozen over lake. Make no mistake though, this car will still let you kick that massive rear end out and wear some rubber off those expensive 325mm wide tires if you got a little cocky. Porsche produced only 1,216 cars total worldwide, with a mere 194 that came to the US. Somehow, these cars trade for under their 2008 sticker price of around $200,000. This example up for sale in Florida is well under that price tag. For obvious reasons, of course.

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