1999 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

Earlier this week I came across a Porsche Cayman S finished in the wonderful Forest Green Metallic. As much as I wanted to jump all over it, a bunch of things added up that probably had me passing on it. As luck would have it, a really early 996 happen to pop up for sale in upstate New York that of course had me taking a closer look. It is your typical 1999 Carrera 2 with the “fried egg” headlights, orange taillights, and maybe not the most opulent interior ever. Still, the value you can get from a 996.1 is there, so why not make the best of it with one in a good color combo?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1999 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

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1995 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet

Another day, another cool Porsche color I didn’t even know existed. This is Kiln Red Metallic that was available on the 1983 and 1984 911s and 928s, and supposedly kept in the Porsche library based on us seeing it on a 1995 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet. It is a very deep red and cooper tone that certainly isn’t obnoxiously loud, but will catch your eye for sure. Interesting that this one is selection on a C4 Cabriolet, as most didn’t go for the loud colors on the cab given they were already pretty noticeable. This example up for sale in San Francisco comes in at just 55,000 miles, but the price might be a little high.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet on San Francisco Craigslist

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1980 Porsche 930 Rinspeed R69

Oh, the 1980s. Full of crazy creations, custom calamities and questionable creativity. If you wanted a crazy tuner car back then, there were plenty of options from mild to wild; some of them we’ve covered, such as the DP slantnose cars and the Koenig widebody 560SEC Mercedes-Benz. But if one company has consistently gone above and beyond, it would have to be Rinspeed. Afterall, they did made a 911 turbo truck that changed color and roofline and was encrusted in jewels. That takes a really special mind – one that most would argue should probably be in a straight jacket. Nevertheless, there’s always a market for the crazy Rinspeed creations, and one of their less extreme models has come up for sale. Based upon a 911 but borrowing water-cooled bits for a unique look, check out the Rinspeed R69:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1980 Porsche 930 Rinspeed R69 on Collecting Cars

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2006 Porsche Cayman S

Green and brown is like chocolate and peanut butter to me. Smooth all the way. If I ever went the route of actually spec’ing a car from new, it would be a nice dark green, over some kind of tan of brown leather. I’m sure I’m not alone in this, so when this 2006 Porsche Cayman S popped up for sale, I naturally had to take a closer look. Forest Green Metallic over Special Cocoa Leather. Yes, please. However, once I started taking that closer look, it didn’t seem so lovely anymore. Let me explain.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2006 Porsche Cayman S on eBay

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2016 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S

Say what you want about the Porsche Cayenne, but without its emergence in the early-2000s, there would be no special Porsche cars that we all enjoy. The easy-to-produce SUVs that platform share with the other VWAG SUVs was not only easy to scale, but saved a ton of labor costs as the majority of it was built at the Volkswagen Bratislava Plant in the Slovak Republic, rather than in Germany that is just used for final assembly. Because of this, Porsche now had the cash to dump into RS cars, Speedsters, and other fun things that Porsche really weren’t forced to build. Just to put it into perspective, Porsche sells as many Cayennes as they do 911s, 718s, Taycans, and Panameras combined. The Macan? Same numbers. So the next time you see a 2006 Cayenne Turbo chugging around with a blown out suspension and blue smoke pouring our the tailpipes, give it a little thanks for funding the 997 GT3 RS 4.0s that exist because of it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S on eBay

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1998 Porsche 911 Carrera S

The 1998 model year was the swan song for the 993 generation, along the air-cooled engine. For some reason, Porsche skipped on the 1998 911 Turbo for the US, so we were left the Targa, Cabriolet 2 and 4, Carrera 4S, and Carrera 2S to chose from for the last of the run. All models were wore the wider body shell, supposedly because Porsche had an abundance of them they needed to use before switching to 996 production. But “abundance” doesn’t necessarily mean there were a lot destined for North America. For the most desirable Carrera S, that meant 1,292 for North America. However, there was some funny math from Porsche on these. All of them were technically manufactured in 1997, but Porsche held some of the supply back and rolled them out as 1998 models. Today’s car was built in October 1997, so it would have been considered a 1998 model year anyway, but I’m guessing this was near the end of the run.

Now as we are well over 20 years-old on these C2S examples, demand for them is high. It is totally understandable. It’s the last air-cooled naturally aspirated, manual gear box, rear-wheel drive Porsche 911. They can even sell for Turbo money if the spec is right. The thing is, just because they are in demand, doesn’t mean you shell out the money simply because they exist. This car in Texas is a perfect example why.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera S on eBay

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1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

Early Porsche 911 Turbos are a sight to behold. A raw and dangerous car if there ever was, which is a major plus for some, but also can be a turn off for those who have to provide for their families. No, I’m not talking about crashing and dying, but rather when it comes time to pull the engine and split the case for a rebuild. That will put you out on the street real quick if you don’t have the cash set aside. Generally, unless you are getting an absolute steal of a deal on buying one, this is not a car you want as a project. It is much cheaper and faster just to spend the money to buy a completed example and be done with it. If you want an early 3.0L Turbo Carrera model like this one up for sale in Texas, start looking. Just around 700 came to the US for the model year, and I’m willing to be much less survived given how many crashed or cut up for racing duty.

As you might of noticed, this is not your typical earth tone color 930. Although they did have some really great colors from the production line, Signal Green was not one of them, so a color change was required. Still, is it worth buying? Or maybe spend your piles of money elsewhere?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

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2015 Porsche Cayman GTS

Last week’s 718 Cayman T was a good option at what I think is a great price, but maybe the turbocharged flat-four wasn’t enough grunt for the people who want to hear their Porsches when they drive them. The answer to that without selling out the $85,000 for the used 918 GT4? The GTS, of course. The GTS still packs a 3.4-liter flat-six with 340 horsepower and looks the part with a lowered suspension, the Sport Chrono package, sport exhaust, and some interior dressings. A run to 60 is in the low four second range and even less with the PDK gearbox, like this 2015 is equipped with. Worth the dough, or still going for 911 at this price range?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2015 Porsche Cayman GTS on eBay

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2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe

Do not adjust your screen. That really is the factory color. What you are looking at is a 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo finished in Meridian Metallic, which Porsche calls a platinum metallic, but you can make your own call on it. Personally I think it almost looks pink or rose gold, but whatever you want to call it, it is a rare shade. Even better, this example has just under 21,000 miles. What’s the catch then? You know where I am going with this.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe on eBay

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1992 Porsche 968 Coupe

The 968 occupies a strange space in the Porsche world. Limited in production, good looking, well-built and with good chassis dynamics and performance, it should have all of the hallmarks of a collector car in today’s market. Many prominent automobile publications have bashed you over the head with that, too – it’s not just me banging on here. Petrolicious posts an article (the same one, usually…) seemingly every week about the Porsche 968 Club Sport, Hemmings has repeatedly said it’s the best of the breed, and Hagerty told you to get on board in 2018 and buy one. And when Bring a Trailer sold one in late 2017 at $36,250, it seemed 2018 was poised to be the year of exploding values on the 968.

But it wasn’t. Bring a Trailer has, so far to date, failed to present a match to that one-off. It’s not for lack of trying – quite a few have come up since, including a Club Sport, but they’re all below $30,000. For reference, they’re selling at about the same price as E30 325is – and I’d argue that they’re a lot nicer. So here we are in 2021, wondering exactly where the values on these cars will head. Today’s clean Guards Red coupe is priced right below that 2017 sale from BaT – so is it a deal?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 968 Coupe on eBay

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