2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring

Guards Red is one of those Porsche colors you can recite without thinking about. It was immensely popular on the G-body cars and naturally carried on to the 964, 993, 996, 997, and now the 991. I don’t think you’ll hear anyone argue it didn’t look good on those early cars, but now that the 991 is roughly twice the size as an original long hood car, you end up looking at a lot of paint. This seems to be true with the 991 with its extra wide hips and overall really big stature when it comes to what are suppose to be light, nimble sports cars. So when I saw this GT3 Touring come up for sale, I had to take a look. I think I’m still on the fence about it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring on eBay

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1992 Porsche 911 Carrera 2

You know why we’re here. This 1991 Porsche 911 C2 is a left-hand drive ROW-spec that was delivered to Japan and painted in the wonderful Veilchenblau. That is “violet” in English, but it is very purple and I love it. I think this car doesn’t punch you in the face like a 991.2 GT3RS in purple does and doesn’t look like it is trying too hard. I know I’m not the only one who feels this way, because the dealer has no problem listing a 964 Turbo S for $1,450,000, but for some reason won’t put a public price on this one. Don’t you love used car dealers?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 at Top Gear Imports

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1997 Porsche 911 Cup 3.8 RSR

While for some the Turbo S and GT2s are the pinnacle of 993 performance and desirability for understandable reasons, for me it’s the Supercup cars that really excite. Building on the 964 Cup design, the 993 received a special version of the Carrera RS’s 3.8 liter M64/20. Dubbed the M64/70, a plastic intake, hotter cams, no cats and a unique non-MAF Motronic computer yielded 315 horsepower. Then, just as they had with the 964, Porsche upped the ante again with the 3.8 RSR. The RSR had an even more unique motor – the M65/75 – which went to a aluminum resonance manifold and individual throttle bodies and hot cams to produce 349 horsepower. You could opt for three different specifications for sprint or endurance, and two different transmission options (one with additional cooling). Outside, in addition to the Cup splitter and giant rear spoiler, the RSR featured GT2-esque tacked on flares covering massive 18″ BBS center-lock magnesium race wheels. It was, in all, a very special package and a claimed 45 were produced.

The thing is, this isn’t one of them. Well, sorta…

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Cup 3.8 RSR on eBay

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2009 Porsche Cayenne GTS

Love them, indifferent, or hate them, the Cayenne was really good for Porsche. They resulted in a significant cash boost for the company that allowed them to really invest in development of the 911 and basically everything else since these SUVs were launched in the early 2000s. So the next time you see a 997 GT3 RS 4.0 driving along, think to yourself, “Thanks Cayenne.” Okay, so maybe that isn’t the first thing that will pop into your head, but you get where I am coming from.

Today, I wanted to look at a Cayenne that isn’t the lease special V6 but also not the insanity that was the Cayenne Turbo and Turbo S. The GTS trim on any model always was, and still is, that sweet spot for those who want something a few notches up from the base model but aren’t spending $200,000 on a Turbo or GT car. The Cayenne GTS was a really nice spec Cayenne that had some different body work, 21″ wheels, and a 400 horsepower 4.8 liter V8. Even better, it was offered in a 6-speed manual that was completely off the table for any person who was married. This 2009 up for sale in Texas has the standard automatic that is significant other friendly, but at the end of the day can still do 0-60 in 5.7 seconds. The best part? They are getting cheap.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2009 Porsche Cayenne GTS on eBay

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2014 Porsche 911 GT3

Would you believe me if I told you that the 991.1 Porsche 911 GT3 had an engine warranty for 10 years or 120,000 miles? Well, it’s true. In one of Porsche’s rare screw-ups (in addition to that whole IMS thing), the engines in the 991.1 GT3 had a metallurgical defect in certain batches of pivoting rocker arms in the valvetrain. This led to misfires at high RPMs and thus, very unhappy customers who spent $135,000 plus another $40,000 in options. If for some reason your engine does fail, Porsche will drop in a new updated engine, no questions asked. You can probably put two and two together and figure out why I am bringing this up. This 2014 up for sale in Colorado just happens to have a fresh updated engine installed in it with just 2,300 miles despite the car having almost 18,000 miles. Not only that, this car has something else that makes it probably the cheapest 991 GT3 out there for sale on the market right now. Let me explain:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2014 Porsche 911 GT3 on eBay

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1996 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Tiptronic

A little over a month ago I checked out a 964 Porsche 911 C2 in a great spec until you noticed it was equipped with the Tiptronic transmission. Nothing really wrong with that, but I felt like it shouldn’t be priced on the same level as the 5-speed cars given the what recent 964s are selling for. Would I kick it out of my garage? Of course not. Would it be my choice all dollars being equal? Of course not.

Building on that, I thought it would be interesting to take a look at the next generation 911 with the old slushbox, the 993. The transmission was exactly the same, a ZF box with four forward gears, as opposed to the standard 6-speed you get with the manual cars. Even worse, the Tiptronic was 55 pounds heavier. Even worse than that, it sucked up the power big time. A 0-60 time in a C2 with the 6-speed was around 5.3 seconds while the same car with the Tiptronic box was 6.2 seconds. Yes, not great. However, this 1996 C2 painted in the lovely Guards Red could be cheap enough for you to consider it, right?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Tiptronic on eBay

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2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

For some reason I’ve been really itching for a Porsche 911 of late. I’ve done all the scenarios in my head from a G-body all the way up to an early 997.1. Naturally the most cost effective way to get into a 911 is a 996.1, but given their less-than-beautiful looks and dreaded IMS issues that the internet compares to a same amount of severity as a tsunami, it might not be the most enjoyable car to buy. However, bump the budget up another $10,000 and you can slide right into 996 Turbo looks without 996 Turbo cost or of course, power. The C4S in my opinion is a great looking car given what you want to work with on the 996 body, and I love they went with a heckblende across the rear like generations past. Today’s car, a 2004 C4S up for sale in Washington state, is painted in the always nice Guards Red and even has a handful of nice little options on the inside.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S on eBay

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1982 Porsche 911SC

Do you want to own a 1973 Carrera RS but can’t swing the purchase price of $600,000? Well, I might have a solution to you. This 1982 Porsche 911SC has the same cool blue wheels, Carrera script, and duck tail deck lid. Thats about it really. In fact, that ’73 RS and this ’82 SC aren’t even the same body. Those cars were longhoods, and this SC naturally is an impact bumper. But still, blue wheels, Carrera script, and duck tail! This car even has blue seatbelts! Now before you get ready to call me crazy down in the comment section, what if I told you this car was $570,000 cheaper than the RS?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 911SC on eBay

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2018 Porsche 911 GT3

Last week I took a look at the new 992 Porsche 911 and while it surely is amazing, it is going to be quite pricey. Naturally I start wondering if I’d rather has a mildly optioned 992 C4S or a 991.2 GT3 or GT3 Touring. I think both cars I going to fall somewhere in that $175,000 range and while the new tech in the 992 sure is amazing, you’d hardly find anyone complaining about what is inside a 991.2. Naturally, I started taking a look around what what 991.2 GT3s were out on the market and ran across today’s car. This 2018 GT3 up for sale in Boise, Idaho of all places has just 2,000 miles and is optioned with the rare 6-speed manual. Not to mention it is painted in the always popular Chalk. Who needs new cars, right?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 on eBay

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2019 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

The new 992 Porsche 911 is starting to trickle into dealers and this past weekend I went to check it out. The local dealer had exactly one, a 2020 911 C4S, that was a demo car until the actual dealer stock arrived in a few weeks and I have to say, I was impressed. It’s no mistake that it is a 911 and looking at it, you’d maybe confuse it with a 991.2. Well, maybe until you got around back. The single lightbar will take some getting used to and the odd little third brake light was clever, but I think a bit repetitive. When the rear wing moves up, it also carries a brake light. However, that doesn’t “count” for regulations standards as the 3rd brake light has to be on a stationary body part. (You’ll see what I mean in the photo after the jump.) The interior was wonderful outside of the little shift knob that people have been griping about since it was introduced and I can see why. It is downright dainty compared to the hunk of the knob in the 991 cars and I don’t even believe you can shift the PDK with it. The old school center analog tach is a cool feature and I’m glad they didn’t go all digital with the dash like most of the cars in the price range. So everything was going swimmingly until he told me the price.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2019 Porsche 911 C4S on eBay

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