2003 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

I don’t mean to harp on the Porsche 996 Carrera 4S so much, but the entire package of what they offer, especially at their current prices, always seem to draw me back in. Whether it be the wide rear end, 18″ Turbo Twist wheels, or the heckblende rear reflector, these cars just seem to do it for me. For what they were working with, I think Porsche nailed this design and pulled just enough pieces from the Turbo to keep you interested, but not so much that it was almost as expensive as the Turbo and no one would bite on it. Now, some 15 years later, this are at the bottom of the price curve and ripe for the picking. Time to snag one?

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2004 Porsche 911 GT2

In terms of the “windowmaker” Porsches, the 996 GT2 certainly seems worthy of that title. Hard to believe that a 996 can be deemed scary, but that is exactly the kind of false confidence that gets you in trouble with these. Having a twin-turbocharged car that will get you to 60 mph in under 4 seconds without the help of traction control or stability control is the perfect combination for the result of “I just lost it” after getting a little too confident. I think Porsche knew this, and as a result only 303 examples of these cars made it to the US from 2002 to 2005. To put that into perspective, that is half of how many Carrera GTs there are.

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1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa Rijkspolitie

“It’s got a cop motor, a 3.2 liter flat-6 plant, it’s got cop tires, cop suspensions, cop shocks. It’s a model made before catalytic converters so it’ll run good on regular gas.”

Okay, so maybe that wasn’t the exact quote, but you get what I’m saying. What we are looking at is a 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa modified to be used by the Rijkspolitie. What exactly is the “Rijkspolitie?” They are the state and national police of The Netherlands. The story goes that post-WW2, Dutch motorways lacked a speed limit and required police cars to keep with whatever was roaming the highways then. Their solution? Call Porsche and order a bunch of 356s to convert to police cars. Apparently they were happy with this arrangement as this practice continued all the way up until the 964 chassis and even included the 914 and 924 as well. A total of 507 Porsches went into police service, making it the largest Porsche police car fleet in the world. Over the years, some of these cars have trickled into private ownership and trade hands every now and then. This Carrera Targa up for sale has all the cool touches, but also comes with a giant price tag.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911SC Targa Rijkspolitie at Loubann Cars

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376k-Mile 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera M491

No, that letter ‘K’ in the title wasn’t a careless keystroke that I’ve been know to make. It is the understanding of the decimal unit prefix in the metric system denoting multiplication by one thousand. In layman’s terms, this 911 has 376,000 miles. To make it even more interesting, this particular 1986 Porsche 911 was optioned with the M491 code, which means “a sheep in wolf’s clothing”. Okay not exactly, but it denotes the car has the body of a 930 Turbo, but engine remains the standard 3.2L flat-six. You’d think this car has 37,000 miles by looking at it, and the owner must think so too as it sure is priced like it is.

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2016 Porsche 911 R

Where have you gone, 911 R? In terms of value, of course. The most heavily speculated Porsche 911 in a long time had a wild ride of instant value rise up to $600,000 and sometimes $700,000, only for it to crash and burn after Porsche announced a GT3 Touring with a 6-speed manual. Suddenly, we were seeing sale prices on 500-mile cars for only $35,000 over sticker, not $350,000. Still, there are few enough 911 R examples out there that dealers can collude to keep prices high, until a private owner needs money and decides making $50,000 for doing nothing is good enough. Today’s example, a car with 2,000 miles up for sale in Florida, still has a giant asking price.

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2017 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

If you are going to all-in on bright green, prepare to go all in. The greens that Porsche offered up back in the 1960s and 1970s were not for the shy and judging by the today’s car, it’s still that way. This is a 2017 911 Carrera 4S in paint-to-sample Viper Green and there is certainly no mistaking it. I can see why they called it Viper Green, because in a never-ending sea of cars in earth tones, seeing a car painted this color is like getting bitten by a viper. Okay, maybe that was an extreme comparison, but you get where I am going with this. Judging by the mileage on this car, it seems like the first owner didn’t like to be seen in this one.

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1989 Porsche 911 Carrera

The 1989 model year was the final year of the torsion-bar 911, and only 1,156 US-market Carrera coupes were made. If that number seems low, it is because the 1989 was a split model year, as the 964s were also sold as 1989 models. Given that the 911 basically looked the same from 1974 to 1989, I can’t imagine it was a fun job trying to sell these 1989 911s when new when totally new 964s were sitting in the showroom. Now some 30 years later, most seek these out for the G50 gearbox and special options like the sport seats. They bring a slight premium over the older 911s with the 915 gearboxes, but at the end of the day its all about condition, mileage, and options. This example caught my eye up for sale in Idaho is finished in classic Carrera White with matching Fuchs and blue interior. A fairly nice spec on its own. Mileage? Just under 121,000. So a potential nice driver-quality 911 for a decent price, right? Not so fast.

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2009 Porsche 911 Targa 4S

The 997.2 Porsche 911 Targa was the last of the sliding roof versions that started with the 993 and ended with the intro of the 991 generation that got extremely complicated. Without looking close enough, you can assume that they are just regular coupes and maybe that is what Porsche was going for. If you happen to see one, they are rare. Only about 3,000 997.2 Targas were made, as compared to the 10s of thousands in the regular coupe bodies. This 2009 for sale in Washington is finished in the classic Carrara White with the Cocoa special leather. The perfect daily driver?

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1995 Porsche 911 Turbo

Wow. That is all I can say about this one. This of course being a 1995 Porsche 911 Turbo finished in Violet Blue Metallic over a Florence Gray leather interior. It is bold both inside and out as you can see, and for some, an ultimate 911. The 993 Turbo has held steady around the $100,000 for the nice examples with some miles, but this one up in Belgium has just under 27,000 miles. Needless to say, this car is not around $100,000. Not even close.

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2008 Porsche 911 GT2

Very few production cars scare me. By “scare,” I mean if you hit the throttle at any reasonable moment, things get very hairy. A few of those cars have the numbers “911,” followed by the letters “GT,” and finally the number 2. The first GT2 for the US market, the 996 GT2, was a car that was probably a little too raw for the general public. If you were cruising along at 65 mph and put your foot to the floor, there is a very high chance the rear end will start to move in directions that you wouldn’t expect. The car doesn’t have traction or stability control, which you think wouldn’t be a problem unless you were driving at the limit, but the limit is very low in a 996 GT2. Or maybe the limit comes up very fast, depending on how you want to look at it.

The next generation and the car we are looking at today, the 997 GT2, thankfully was a tiny bit more tame. It had Porsche Stability Management (PSM), along with traction control to keep you from looking like a baby deer on a frozen over lake. Make no mistake though, this car will still let you kick that massive rear end out and wear some rubber off those expensive 325mm wide tires if you got a little cocky. Porsche produced only 1,216 cars total worldwide, with a mere 194 that came to the US. Somehow, these cars trade for under their 2008 sticker price of around $200,000. This example up for sale in Florida is well under that price tag. For obvious reasons, of course.

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