1987 Porsche 924S “Safari”

The “Safari” formula is pretty predicable by now. Take a vehicle, fit some suspension components to lift it, add some knobby tires, auxiliary lighting, and a roof rack if you are feeling spicy. If you really want to go to the point of no return, cut the fenders and bolts on some giant plastic flares. Done. You have yourself a “safari” car. As you might have guessed, this is what we are looking at today.

This is a 1987 Porsche 924S up for sale in Quebec that has all the typical stuff. Sawzall to the fenders, stick on giant BFGoordwich K/O 2 tires, a mix-match of lights, and a roof basket. Since this is a 924S, there are no real performance modifications at all. However, this could be fun for the correct price, right? Well, not so much.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 924 S on eBay

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Front Engined, 2-door Porsches

Now that the unthinkable has happened and both four door sedan and SUV Porsche models exist, where do the older, front engined Porsches stand in the eyes of collectors these days?  Here’s two clean examples of two vastly different Porsches from the same era.

1987 Porsche 924 S

The 1987 Porsche 924 S represents the zenith of 924 development, as 1988 was the last year for the sports car originally designed to be Volkswagen’s flagship.  The 924 S does away with that one important piece that had purists refusing to consider it as a real Porsche: the engine.  VW stopped supplying Porsche engines for the 924 in 1984, and thus the 924 S with it’s detuned 944 engine was introduced.  This engine is good for 160 horsepower and is sure to be a great handler, as these front engined/rear drive four cylinders were renowned for their road manners.

The seller states:

PROS: A/C, Power steering, Power windows, Four-wheel disc brakes, Manual transmission, Alloy wheels, CD/MP3 Premium sound system, Leather seats, Tilt/removable sunroof, New Battery/New wipers, and Pirelli tires.  All the manuals, service records, and a full color dealer brochure on the model 924 are included.

CONS: There are two blemishes in paint: front right fender and rear left quarter panel, The plastic gear for sunroof needs replacement (20.00 part) still works though, Minor cracks in dash which are covered by premium dash cover, and the tires are in less than perfect condition.  Other than that car is showroom quality.

While Boxsters can be had all day for well under $20,000, at $6,500, this 924 S is a tasty, low cost means of entry in what could be one of Stuttgart’s most underrated models.  The fact that it is well documented, has a manual transmission and is a desirable color adds to the want factor.

1994 Porsche 928 GTS

The 928 GTS, much like the 924 S highlighted above, represents the end of the line for 928 production.  The GTS models were also rather rare, with only 645 produced in 1994, according to the 928 Registry.  This particular one presents well in white with the more common automatic transmission.

Level of equipment as detailed by the seller:

Power sunroof, full power seats left & right, AM/FM Radio w/ Cassette, 6 Disc CD Changer, Supple Leather, 10 Speaker HiFi Sound Package, Rear A/C.  Just passed 100 point inspection.

While close to $40,000 may seem high for an obscure, used Porsche, one should remember that these cars new cost around $80,000 before options and now, for less than half of that, you can own a clean mileage grand tourer for pre owned Boxter money.  It also pays to get the nicest 928 you can buy, as these neither cheap nor easy to repair.

-Paul