1994 Porsche 968 Club Sport

$_57 (1)

At the 1992 Paris Motor Show, Porsche would introduce one of the last evolutions of their venerable front-engined, four-cylinder model that traced its roots back to the 924 of the late 1970s: the 968 Club Sport. This was a lightweight special of the 968 that had a few amenities deleted such as AC, sunroof, rear seats along with a good amount of soundproofing. Around 50 kilograms (~ 110 pounds) was saved, which resulted in a modest increase in acceleration to 100 mph of a half second. However, for those track day enthusiasts out there, this was certainly a more suitable platform to begin with than a bog standard 968. This 968CS for sale at 4Star Classics in the UK is one of a handful of RHD models, made even more unique as it is painted in a special order Amaranth Violet.

Click for details: 1994 Porsche 968 Club Sport at 4Star Classics

1967 Porsche 911S Soft-window Targa – REVISIT

$_57

The very rare Gulf Blue 911S Soft-window Targa we featured back in September is up for auction once again. Rather than the $195,000 Buy It Now price of the original listing, this is now up as a reserve auction with a starting bid of $145,000. Also, rather than Argentina it now resides in Denver, Colorado, which should make it a little easier for interested to buyers to view the car and see how it is sorted out. Any 911S is extremely valuable so we’ll have to see what sort of bidding this particular car might receive.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1967 Porsche 911S Soft-window Targa on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site September 1, 2014:

1991 Porsche 928GT

There is little replacement for a good Grand Tourer. Big engine in the front, two doors in the middle, and two drive wheels in the rear. It’s a combination of features that always pleases. Porsche, however, might disagree with us on this since they’ve never bothered to replace the 928 since its demise in 1995. Maybe they feel the 911 can handle such duties just fine, or maybe they figure four doors is the way to go rather than two. Regardless of their reasons, for us a proper Porsche GT requires we reach back a few decades to find something like this: a Grand Prix White 1991 Porsche 928GT, located in Missouri, with the highly desirable 5-speed manual transmission and just 33,968 miles on it. The 928GT wasn’t the ultimate expression of these cars as the 928GTS would come along one year after this one, but with the 928GT’s 5.0 liter V8 upfront delivering its 330hp rearward there still was plenty of available thrust to propel these cars forward.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 928GT on eBay

1976 Porsche 914-6 3.0

In this morning’s post on the Audi TT’s future collectability potential, I mentioned the Porsche 914. Long considered one of the most unappreciated Porsches, over the past few years the underrated and unloved 914 has quickly risen in its own right to be a collectable item. The most collectable are the original 914-6s, but of course the low cost of ownership for some time meant there are a lot of motor-swapped 914s cruising around. Some are better than others and not all are desirable – I’d take an original and clean 914 over a poorly swapped car. But some really grab attention, as this 3.0 engined car did to me:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 914-6 on eBay

1989 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 – owned by Ferdinand Porsche’s daughter

From time to time we come across cars with an interesting ownership history, usually something owned by a famous athlete or actor, or the occasional car owned by a highly-regarded builder or racing driver. This car here, however, a 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera 4, painted in a very subtle Silver Purple Metallic, takes all of that to a different level. This particular 964 was the car built for Dr. Ferdinand Porsche’s daughter, Louise Piëch, which gives it a cool factor that is difficult to surpass. Of course, some buyers care little for these sorts of details, and as such this probably isn’t the car for them, but at least it provides other interesting details like a rarely seen exterior color and unique interior trim. All of these things combine to make this Carrera 4 a car that clearly is set apart from the pack.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 on Springbok Sportwagen

1997 Porsche 911 Carrera S Coupe

Most any wide-bodied Carrera is going to be immensely popular among Porsche enthusiasts and it only takes a few brief looks to see exactly why. Whether it is the full-blown RSR or simply an aesthetic difference like the car we see here, the enhanced shape of the stretched wider rear gets the heart racing. And of course it is the racing utility of that wider rear that makes these so desirable. For the last of the air-cooled 911s there were two naturally-aspirated Carreras, along with the 993 Turbo, to choose from for those who sought that wider rear body: the Carrera S and the Carrera 4S. The basic difference between the two models obviously lies in the number of drive wheels doing the work for each. For my money, the Carrera S is the one to have. Lighter and more faithful to the rear-drive design that lay at the heart of the 911 experience they are the ultimate expression of the air-cooled design. The example here is an Ocean Blue Metallic, 1997 Porsche 911 Carrera S Coupe, located in Chicago, with 39,790 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Carrera S Coupe on eBay

Motorsports Monday Budget Racers: 944 v. 325is

Let’s be honest; going to the track is a bit of an addiction. Few make it out the other side without having at least contemplated heavy and expensive upgrades to their cars. The symptoms of the illness vary from patient to patient, but most exhibit similar characteristics; starting with a somewhat sporty road car, the owners quickly engage in a series of modifications that will make them “faster”. These modifications nearly always degrade the everyday usefulness of your road-going machine, and ultimately no matter how much you modify a street car, it will still be a compromised design. You simply can’t create a track weapon that is road-legal without some compromise. The result, then, is bobble-headed enthusiasts driving their barely-suspended, over cambered and too loud cars around looking – let’s be truthful – a bit of a fool. What’s a smarter option? Well, if you really want to drive faster on track, you find a slow car that someone has already made into a racer. First off, you’re getting into a more pure track car. They’re not road legal generally, so all of the goodies that make life bearable on the street are gone making them lighter. If the build was done right and well, you’re probably saving a lot of money, too. But the real benefit of getting a slower car is that you’re doing more of the driving – ask any racer, and most will say that extracting maximum performance from a slow car is more rewarding than allowing the computers in your GT-R to obliterate the pavement for you. Two of the most popular German cars to hit the track in are here today – the venerable E30 in 325is form, and the iconic Porsche 944. Which will hit the finish line first?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 BMW 325is on eBay

1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe Restomod

Backdating an air-cooled 911 to resemble one of its much-beloved long-hood brethren has become quite popular and it’s always a joy to see the various ways in which builders choose to pick and choose from the 911 parts bin in order to create these special cars. The nature of the 911 market means these are never an inexpensive proposition as sourcing the car from which to create the build can itself set you back quite a bit. When done well a builder can affect quite a transformation and produce a car the details of which force us to pause over every angle to get a sense of just how everything has been put together. The car we see here, a 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe backdated to resemble a RSR, certainly is not perfect, but it possesses the vintage look of an early 911 combined with the softer curves of the more modern designs and has just enough detail without coming across as over the top.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe Restomod on eBay

Art and the Automobile: Porsche Racing

I can’t really speak to how the younger generation fills their mind with automotive images today, but when I was a kid those images came through the exceedingly rare sightings on the street and the posters that I had on my wall. So as we continue our artwork theme for the holiday season, today we’ll take a look at some art reflecting Porsche’s racing history, with specific attention to Le Mans but with a few other interesting pieces added in. Racing has served as a centerpiece of Porsche’s branding almost since the beginning and its success in road racing has been integral to the success of the marque itself. And there is no stronger testament to a car’s combination of reliability and performance than a Le Mans victory.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1970 Porsche 917 Le Mans print on eBay

1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe – REVISIT

The 1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe we featured in early October is back up for sale with a $10K reduction in its price, now listed at $189,999.99. The Slantnose 911s do not appeal to everyone, but as a symbol of ’80s flair and excess they are rarely topped. Even with significant collector appeal it will be interesting to see if the market for one of these has reached these heights.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site October 4, 2014: