1987 Porsche 928S4

Truth be told this wasn’t the 928 I originally intended to post. It was going to be this 928 GTS 5-speed also for sale at Parkhaus. Those obviously are highly sought after cars. But as I continued looking about I then came across this very similar looking 1987 Porsche 928S4 and the price difference simply became too much for me to continue with the GTS. The GTS certainly is quite nice, but for 100 grand less you could have this one. That’s a lot of money saved!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 928S4 on eBay

Feature Listing: Venetian Blue 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet M491

Turbo-look Carreras are becoming a regular occurrence around here. That’s good! These are some of our favorite of the classic 911s for their combination of 930 appearance, suspension, and braking, but in a little more refined and less high strung a package. They’re also pretty rare. We like rare.

We especially like rare 911s when they are looking their best and have spent a decent bit of time being driven by the owners who derive so much joy from them. Here all of these facets come together in this Venetian Blue Metallic 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet with Champagne interior. As I’ve noted with previous M491 Carrera posts, the later ’87-’89 model years represent a special subset of these cars given that they came with the G50 5-speed transmission and that there are fewer of them since the 930 was now back and available for the US market. For some wide-body top-down cruising, this 911 should provide just the thing you’re seeking.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Venetian Blue 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet M491 on Rennlist

Tuner Tuesday: 1987 RUF BTR

The well worn cliche is that power is intoxicating. While typically that expression is used in reference to abuses by individuals it seems no less applicable to cars. Once you get a taste of a level of acceleration, you begin to want more. And more. And maybe even a little more. Thankfully there exist outlets for such desires; builders who are happy to provide you with completely unnecessary levels of power in our continual pursuit of more. Just bring your wallet.

For your Porsche the name nearly synonymous with the need for extra power is RUF. RUF has been in the game for a long time, producing modified Porsches for 40 years. While in many cases these are conversions where the owner buys a 911 and has RUF parts added by an appropriate installer (or by RUF themselves), RUF also has produced their own builds utilizing nothing more than a Porsche chassis. These cars were badged as a RUF rather than a Porsche and come with a RUF VIN. The one we see most commonly and the one that really got the whole thing started is the BTR. Fitted with a 3.4 liter turbocharged flat-6 mated to a 5-speed manual the BTR was a much more powerful version of the 930 capable of outclassing most any production car available at the time. Naturally that extra performance along with their relative rarity makes them a highly sought after commodity. Here we have one such beast: a 1987 RUF BTR, located in Virginia, with 37,472 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 RUF BTR on eBay

1987 Porsche 944S with 15,000 Miles

It’s no great revelation that values of the transaxle Porsches are all over the place. I looked at two of the most expensive you could buy recently with the twin low-mileage Turbo S Silver Rose examples:

Double Take – 25,000 Miles Total: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S Silver Rose

In impeccable condition, it was no surprise that the asks were out-of-reach for nearly all enthusiasts. On the other end of the spectrum sits the lowly 924; you recently had your choice of either of these very clean examples for about $4,000, both special in their own way:

Face Off: 1980 Porsche 924 Turbo v. 1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition

But I have to say, the one I covered recently that bothered me the most was the $20,000 ask for the 1988 944 Special Edition, or “Celebration”, model. Sure, it had one of the coolest interiors offered by Porsche in the period, though it’s soundly outdone by the Silver Rose.

1988 Porsche 944 ‘Celebration’ Special Edition

But I just can’t wrap my head around why you’d want to pay a premium for one. For the 924S Special Edition, it makes sense, in a way. The delta between normal and SE values is small and there are tangible performance gains for the Special Edition. But the Celebration was effectively just a loaded 944 with a neat interior. Surely, there must be a better option?

There was.

Alongside the appearance package offered on the regular 944, Porsche introduced the “Super” 944. The new M44/40 double overhead cam motor upped power output substantially to nearly 190, but outside of the subtle “S” badge on the rear and the embossed “16 Ventlier” on the side trim, there were no signs of the performance gains under the hood. There was a substantial change, however, to the base price, which cut the middle ground between the ~$32,000 944 and ~$40,000 Turbo at around $37,000.…

Paint-to-Sample 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa M491 Turbolook

After seemingly going a while without seeing one it now appears Turbolook 911s are all coming out of the woodwork. I’ve posted a couple that I particularly liked, one of which specifically because it was a coupe as those still aren’t coming around very often. It is still the case that most of those we see are the earlier, and slightly less desirable, models with the 915 5-speed transmission. There are fewer of the later G50 transmission models with the ’89MY naturally leading the way in rarity.

But here we have one of those later models. It’s not a Coupe, but still has plenty of appeal in its own right: a paint-to-sample Marine Blue Metallic 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa with the M491 package and 81,713 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Paint-to-Sample 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa M491 Turbolook on eBay

1987 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet

Last week I presented a 930 Slantnose that I thought was about as ’80s as a Porsche could get. While I don’t think this one pushes beyond it, it certainly brings with it its own ’80s appeal and includes elements that 930 Coupe lacked.

Here we have a Cassis Red Metallic 1987 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet with just 45,400 miles on it. The very fact that it’s a Cabriolet, rather than a Coupe, garners it an extra dose of excess in appearance. The Slantnose, side strakes, and massive spoiler when paired with a top-down environment really bring a peculiarity to the design that we don’t often see. The chrome wheels take it over the top. The full wood dash too strikes me as very much an ’80s sort of feature. Not that a wood dash itself dates the car, but when fitted to a Slantnose 911 Turbo it creates a disjunction combining luxury and aggression that feels very at home in the time period. It’s all quite fascinating, really.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet on Rennlist

Litmus Test: Granite Green Metallic 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

We sometimes can be a bit hard on cars with very low mileage. Why buy any car – especially a performance car – to park it in a garage and treat it like a museum piece? Or some ornamental furniture? It seems wasteful. This 911 has suffered from no such stagnation. It has almost 250K miles on it. While that’s still not a ton of miles per year, it is a good bit more than most 911s we see. It’s been enjoyed. It has stories; drives bringing its owners excitement, and perhaps even some heartache whenever it was sold. It’s also damn good looking and sitting mostly in its original specification of Granite Green Metallic over a Grey-Green interior. All of this beauty is on auction with no reserve. We really can’t ask for too much more with any 911.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Granite Green Metallic 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

Tuner Tuesday E30 Showdown: 1986 Alpina C2 2.5 v. 1987 Hartge H26

We last got to look at a modified E30 through the disappointing realization that finally after years of trying to sell with different dealers, the car listed as an Alpina C2 2.5 was just a very convincing replica. But as noted, the car was clean and wore a lot of really expensive Alpina bits – so while the price tag of $22,800 seemed high for a replica, it was in some ways amazingly justified.

So what happens when the car in question is a real Alpina? We find out when we look at an actual Alpina C2. The asking price in that case was nearly double at $39,500. And when you factor in that the C2 is one of the less desirable E30 Alpinas out there, that’s drawn into sharper contrast.

So here we are again with another Alpina to consider, but it’s not alone. One of our readers spotted a Hartge H26 – an even more rare to see variant of modified 1980s E30. And to kick the rarity up a few notches, both are 4-doors instead of the usual 2-door sedans. So how do they compare in terms of pricing, and are these cars all that they seem?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Alpina C2 2.5 on eBay

Mystery Solved?: 1987 Alpina C2 2.5

Back in February, I took a look at very hot item in the marketplace – a clean, European-spec BMW E30 modified by Alpina.

Or, at least that was what was claimed.

Further research pointed out some problems. I found it to be a car I looked at two years ago in 2015, then listed as a 1986 C2 2.5. The VIN was transposed incorrectly, but the stranger item was that the year was wrong. Stranger still was that a tremendous amount of the car didn’t seem to work. Yet it was a lot of Alpina for the money even as an automatic, as it was relatively clean and priced well below other similar E30 Alpina asks.

Well, here we are some ten months later and it’s popped up in a new listing with a new seller. We’ve seen that before, so no big surprise there. As I started to look through the listing, though, I was struck by just how lazy it was. Okay, there were new photos, but none of them were detailed. The VIN is filled in with “1”s. Then I got to the text, which is a near-carbon copy of the last listing. I say near for two reasons – one, the current listing cut and paste the prior listing….twice. So, halfway through the details, you start all over again!

But perhaps that was done to distract you from the one detail which was added to this listing. Cleverly stuck in after the copying of the prior listing, just before all the fees you’ll need to pay, was a second change and the line which finally answers the questions about this car:

Note this is an Alpina clone with correct Alpina numbered engine.

That’s a pretty frustrating statement to bury in the end of the listing. The ad listing has, for the last several years, maintained how rare this car is and they’re just now getting around to admitting it’s not a real example?…

1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Carat by Duchatelet Cabriolet

What do we have here? This 911 is really rare and I’ll admit I was a little stumped by the designer until after some searching. This is a Black 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet with a Carat by Duchatelet interior. It’s located in New Jersey and has only 48,000 miles on it thanks to hanging around in storage for more than a decade.

So who is Duchatelet? A company out of Belgium well-known for their Carat by Duchatelet high-end interior work performed principally on Mercedes-Benz and Rolls-Royce cars of the ’80s. Apparently they also worked on Porsches. From the outside their designs are pretty subtle, so much so that when I first was looking through these pictures I couldn’t figure out what was so unique about it. When you get to the interior, it all becomes quite clear!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Carat by Duchatelet Cabriolet on eBay