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Author: Carter

2005 Audi A8L W12 quattro

About a year ago, I took a look at the top of the heap for Audis in the early 2000s – the A8 W12.

2009 Audi A8L W12 quattro

With a sticker price of roughly $120,000, they were about five times more expensive than an A4 1.8T quattro. For that, you got more room, more luxury, and more power – 450 horsepower, to be exact. Standard luxuries were also impressive; Audi’s MMI system, 16-way power front seats trimmed in Valcona leather upholstery and equipped with massage elements and ventilation, a rear-seat DVD entertainment system, Bose surround sound, polished wood trim, powered rear side window shades, heated front and rear seats…essentially, this was a Swiss ski resort that could move pretty quickly – to the Swiss ski resort. Today’s car also had some pricey options; the $2k adaptive cruise control system, 20″ wheels, a solar sunroof, and a special interior and full leather upgrade.

Last year’s example came to market with 60k miles and a $68k asking price – pretty hard to justify in my mind. Today’s car? Well, let’s say it’s been well used, but it still looks good. What does the high-mileage discount equate to?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Audi A8L W12 on eBay

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2003 Audi RS6

From the end of the C3 chassis we looked at the other day to the launch of the C5 was just a scant 7 years. The styling was evolutionary and instantly recognizable, but the C5 really broadened Audi’s offerings in the U.S. market. Building on the success of the A4, Audi launched not only the normal sedan and wagon offerings, but the return of the S6 and introduction of new 2.7T performance models, along with the Volvo-challenging Allroad.

The pinnacle of the C5 was, of course, the twin-turbocharged all-wheel drive version you see here built by Audi’s skunkworks, quattro GmbH. With assistance from VAG-owned Cosworth Engineering, the resulting BCY motor cranked out a peak 444 horsepower at 5,700 rpms and an impressive 415 lb.ft of torque between 1,950 rpms and 5,600 revs. The body, brakes, wheels and suspension were all upgraded by quattro GmbH too, with plenty of technology incorporated to transfer the power to the ground and keep the RS6 planted. Though it was saddled with an automatic transmission only and tipped the scales at a massive 4,050 lbs, the tenacious all-wheel drive, computer programming and massive power resulted in a 4.4 second 0-60 sprint, besting both the contemporary M5 and E55 AMG. The RS6 had 14.4″ front brakes, dynamic ride control, and meaty 255-section Pirelli P-Zeros to control that speed. Lowered ride height, flared sills and fenders and giant gaping intakes and exhaust along with signature honeycomb grills set the stage for how these cars have looked since.

The first RS model imported to the U.S., Audi expected to sell 860 at nearly $80,000 a pop. But they didn’t. They sold more, such was the demand, with an estimated 1,200 making the journey to North America. But as with basically all complicated, fast older German cars, they’re not worth what they were new, making them very tempting in the used marketplace. And there are a lot of used RS6s out there to choose from at any given time – currently, there are 10 available just on eBay. The thing is, you should avoid most of them. But not this one:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2003 Audi RS6 on eBay

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1987 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V

The arrival of the second-generation Scirocco in 1982 was, to be honest, not much of a revelation. It’s not as though I don’t appreciate the design, though how it came about is somewhat suspect. Volkswagen canned Giugiaro as the replacement designer for the exceptionally beautiful and unique first-generation car, moving in-house to Karmann for the second go at the Golf-based sport coupe. The result looked rather suspiciously like Giugiaro’s Italdesign Asso di Fiori from 1979 and Asso di Quadri from 1976, though – the car that became the Isuzu Impulse. Two years later, and Viola! the Scirocco II debuts from Karmann with a near-identical shape. On top of that, the mechanicals continued to be based upon the first generation Golf.

It wasn’t until 1986 that VW coupe fans finally got to rejoice as the addition of the PL 1.8 liter dual-cam inline-4 finally joined the lineup. Based on Oettinger’s head design and now with 123 high-revving horsepower, the Scirocco went a bit more like the wind it was named after. The wide-ratio, economy-minded gearbox of yore was gone too, replaced by a close-ratio gearbox. Like the GTI and GLI, 14″ ‘Teardrop’ wheels and a new bodykit heightened the boy-racer appearance, and the 16V models got all matchy-matchy before the Golf and Jetta, too, with body-colored painted bumpers.

Today they’re hard to find in good condition at all. This Tornado Red example spotted by one of our readers sure is great, though!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V on eBay

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2001 Audi S4 Avant

I’ve noticed an interesting trend over the past few months – vehicles shipped to a Latin American country and then restored. Perhaps this points to a larger issue in the US – specialized work on cars has become very expensive, and far fewer shops are undertaking projects for “average” enthusiasts. Today’s car, a US-spec S4 Avant, is claimed to have been shipped to Puerto Rico and restored. It sure looks good from what is shown, and it has a lot of modifications that should make it seriously quick. Is it worth a roll of the dice?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Audi S4 Avant on eBay

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1985 Volkswagen Golf with 29,600 Miles

The ’85 and ’86 model-year Volkswagen Golfs were a bit unique, since the base and diesel models were manufactured in Westmoreland, Pennsylvania. There were minor trim differences, but the easiest way to spot them was the Rabbit-inspired sealed-beam headlights and unique grille. Unlike today’s market, where the Golf has gone upscale, the launch of the A2 chassis for the US market saw the diesel Golf as the cheapest way to buy a VW – and the gas unit was only a hair more money. But they were fairly basic transportation; the 1.8 liter inline-4 GX motor was rated at 85 horsepower for adequate acceleration and fuel mileage. Interiors were basic tweed in a few colors, you had to option in things like a radio and power anything (including steering!), and they came with 13″ steel wheels. If you wanted more upscale, you either spent another $1,000 and bought a Jetta, or in 1986 Volkswagen added the Wolfsburg package to make you feel a bit more special.

Today’s car is a fairly basic first-year US Golf that was ordered with an automatic gearbox and air conditioning. But the big story here is the low mileage, with under 30k since new. This isn’t an everyday occurrence, since these cars were workhorses from new and not collector cars. And it sounded familiar to me, so after some looking sure enough – I checked it out a little over four years ago.

1985 Volkswagen Golf with 29,000 Miles

With only a few more miles on the clock since that time, but with the market for 80s classics having reached a new level, what does 2018’s $10k asking price look like today?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Volkswagen Golf on eBay

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