1998 Porsche 911 Carrera S

The 1998 model year was the swan song for the 993 generation, along the air-cooled engine. For some reason, Porsche skipped on the 1998 911 Turbo for the US, so we were left the Targa, Cabriolet 2 and 4, Carrera 4S, and Carrera 2S to chose from for the last of the run. All models were wore the wider body shell, supposedly because Porsche had an abundance of them they needed to use before switching to 996 production. But “abundance” doesn’t necessarily mean there were a lot destined for North America. For the most desirable Carrera S, that meant 1,292 for North America. However, there was some funny math from Porsche on these. All of them were technically manufactured in 1997, but Porsche held some of the supply back and rolled them out as 1998 models. Today’s car was built in October 1997, so it would have been considered a 1998 model year anyway, but I’m guessing this was near the end of the run.

Now as we are well over 20 years-old on these C2S examples, demand for them is high. It is totally understandable. It’s the last air-cooled naturally aspirated, manual gear box, rear-wheel drive Porsche 911. They can even sell for Turbo money if the spec is right. The thing is, just because they are in demand, doesn’t mean you shell out the money simply because they exist. This car in Texas is a perfect example why.

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1994 Mercedes-Benz SL280 5-Speed

Hey there. This is something different. What we have today in a 1994 Mercedes-Benz SL280 up for sale in the heart of London. If the car being a 5-speed manual didn’t raise your eyebrows, how about I tell you it is actually left-hand drive as well? According to this dealer, the car was originally delivered to Monaco, which probably explains why it only has 35,000 miles. However, a quick check of the UK MOT shows consistent tests starting in 2005, so this one was booted from the beautiful ̶t̶a̶x̶ ̶h̶a̶v̶e̶n̶  vacation spot long ago, probably for being far too plebeian. Naturally, my gear were immediately turning seeing how this would be an ideal import to the US. However, once I saw the price, I threw in the towel rather quickly.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Mercedes-Benz SL280 5-Speed on eBay

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1968 BMW Glas 3000 V8

Two names appear in this post that aren’t nearly as widely recognized as they should be. The first is Andreas Glas, the proprietor of Hans Glas GmbH. In the 1960s, this company briefly moved away from its bonds as constructor of sewing machines and licensed Goggomobils to produce some seriously pretty coupes; the 1300GT and 1700GT were the first and better known, but the 2600 and 3000 V8 were no less striking. That’s because of the second name involved in this post; Pietro Frua.

Frua isn’t nearly as well known as the other great Italian designers of the 1960s, but he had a unique style all his own. Well before Gandini and Giugiaro capitalized on the angular wedge era of automotive design, Frua’s low, long and flat lines stood sharply apart from the rounded arches that dominated Pininfarina, Ghia and Vignale. Glas used the designs, along with the pioneering use of timing belts, to offer a slightly different vision of German transportation. It was more emotive, more flowing and, frankly, more pretty than just about anything else in period from the major manufacturers. Indeed, many compared Frua’s work on the 2600 to the Maserati Sebring – exotic company, indeed, and fitting given that the designer went on to work on several of the Trident’s designs.

But Hans Glas GmbH was bought out outright by BMW, mostly for the procurement of the Dingolfing plant and engineering crew. Before BMW closed the chapter, though, they updated a few of the Glas designs with new Munich power, stuck some BMW badges on them and Viola! A new catalog of cars! This 1968 BMW Glas 3000 V8 is an example of the seldom seen period of BMW history:

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1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

Early Porsche 911 Turbos are a sight to behold. A raw and dangerous car if there ever was, which is a major plus for some, but also can be a turn off for those who have to provide for their families. No, I’m not talking about crashing and dying, but rather when it comes time to pull the engine and split the case for a rebuild. That will put you out on the street real quick if you don’t have the cash set aside. Generally, unless you are getting an absolute steal of a deal on buying one, this is not a car you want as a project. It is much cheaper and faster just to spend the money to buy a completed example and be done with it. If you want an early 3.0L Turbo Carrera model like this one up for sale in Texas, start looking. Just around 700 came to the US for the model year, and I’m willing to be much less survived given how many crashed or cut up for racing duty.

As you might of noticed, this is not your typical earth tone color 930. Although they did have some really great colors from the production line, Signal Green was not one of them, so a color change was required. Still, is it worth buying? Or maybe spend your piles of money elsewhere?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

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1986 BMW 535i

The E28 is a firm favorite among fans of 80s BMWs, but it’s the M5 and 535iS variants that get most of the attention. It’s not hard to see why. The M5 based on this platform was one of the first super sedans, laying down the classic formula for all modern Q-ships: supreme performance packaged in a stealthy, unassuming exterior. Meanwhile the 535iS appealed to those who wanted a bit of flash but couldn’t quite afford the full cream M-car, and was really just a 535i with firmer suspension, body kit, and sport seats. That isn’t a bad thing. The underlying car, introduced as a range-topper in 1984, was a winner, marrying the bulletproof M30 3.4 liter straight six engine (good for about 182 hp, in US emissions restricted form) with a tractable and responsive chassis. A regular 535i with a manual gearbox therefore offers a fun and relatively affordable alternative to the more expensive E28s out there, and this ’86 is a perfect example of that.

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2020 BMW M2 CS

If the lack of a ‘true’ M-branded motor in the M2 was just too much for your ego to take, BMW offered you two solutions to up the ante. The M2 Competition borrowed the S55 motor and upgraded a few bits, giving you right around 400 horsepower and matching torque to play with. You can grab one for about a 20-25% premium over a M2. Not enough? BMW didn’t think so, either. Enter the 2020 BMW M2 CS. The CS also borrowed bits, but this time from the upgraded Competition Package F8X M3/4 – meaning you now had 10% more horsepower at 444. They also chopped some weight off, added some fantastic gold wheels, threw in some special trim, and limited the number being imported. The result? A very special – and very expensive – 2-Series:

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TT Double TTake: 2005 Audi TT Coupe 225 quattro and 2002 TT Roadster 225 quattro

The TT Roadster sold for $8,145 and the Coupe sold for $8,100.

Currently, almost no one has time to even consider the 8N chassis Audi TT. It’s old, with the last of the first generation produced 15 years ago and its replacement – the 8J – has also fully completed a production cycle. It doesn’t have the super wiz-bang computers, million horsepower engines, or cut-your-hand-on-the-front-end styling of the new models. A fair amount lay in a state of disrepair; crashed, thrashed and trashed to a point where they’re nearly given away – quite seriously, there’s one near me for $1,500. But find a good one, and I think now is the prime time to grab a clean TT that will be a future collectable – and BaT recently has sold a few low mileage examples at or over $20,000. Today’s duo of quattros aren’t nearly as clean or low mileage, but they’re also a lot cheaper. Which would you take?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Audi TT Coupe 225 quattro on eBay

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2015 Porsche Cayman GTS

Last week’s 718 Cayman T was a good option at what I think is a great price, but maybe the turbocharged flat-four wasn’t enough grunt for the people who want to hear their Porsches when they drive them. The answer to that without selling out the $85,000 for the used 918 GT4? The GTS, of course. The GTS still packs a 3.4-liter flat-six with 340 horsepower and looks the part with a lowered suspension, the Sport Chrono package, sport exhaust, and some interior dressings. A run to 60 is in the low four second range and even less with the PDK gearbox, like this 2015 is equipped with. Worth the dough, or still going for 911 at this price range?

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2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe

Do not adjust your screen. That really is the factory color. What you are looking at is a 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo finished in Meridian Metallic, which Porsche calls a platinum metallic, but you can make your own call on it. Personally I think it almost looks pink or rose gold, but whatever you want to call it, it is a rare shade. Even better, this example has just under 21,000 miles. What’s the catch then? You know where I am going with this.

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2015 Mercedes-Benz S63 AMG Coupe

In my opinion, the Mercedes-Benz S-Class AMG coupe is as close as a personal jet you can on four wheels. I’ll put it up against any current offering from Bentley and Rolls-Royce and say it is better. Decade after decade, Mercedes seems to do it right with these and the prices reflect that. Funny how that works. The C217 generation that just wrapped up production raised the bar again. The example I wanted to look at today, a 2015 S63 AMG, is now a hard to believe six-years old, but still could pass as a new car. The price? Take about $100,000 off the sticker. Sounds like a deal, right? Not just yet.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2015 Mercedes-Benz S63 AMG Coupe on eBay

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