1992 Audi 100CS quattro Avant

Though it was instantly recognizable as an Audi, the all-new-for-’92 C4 bore little resemblance to the boxy C3 it replaced. Fluid lines and curves dominated the design, while new running gear and motors made a splash in performance. The C4 continued to stress Audi’s pioneering aerodynamic tradition, but the result this time was a car which seemed far less top-heavy than the chassis it replaced. It looked more trim even if it was a bit bigger than the outgoing model.

On the fly, the 100’s new motivation was a revelation. The 2.8 liter V6 replaced the 2.3 liter inline-5, and though horsepower was only 172 and torque 184, both figures represented a nearly 30% gain over the 5-pot. New, too, was a 4-speed automatic transmission. And while the inside looked little different from the last of the C3, only switchgear was shared and the C4 brought a host of new safety and convenience features to the large-chassis Audi.

Strange, though, was the re-appearance of Audi’s earlier naming convention in the US. Back in the early days of the 5000, Audi had used the “S” and “CS” monikers to denote turbo and quattro models at times (but, again being Audi, inconsistently). Well, the S and CS were back after a four-year hiatus. Base model 100 came with steel wheels, while the “S” model stepped you up in options and gave you alloys. But outside of the 20V turbo S4 model, the 100 to get was still the 100CS, which was the most loaded and gave you the option for Audi’s quattro drivetrain. Fully loaded, they were around $35,000 – not cheap, but also not the most expensive in class, and were still pretty unique in offering all-wheel drive. But like the C3, the front-drive 100/100S/100CS outsold the quattro model by a fair margin and are more common to find still kicking today. Audi claims they traded just 2,230 of the new 100CS quattro in 1992, only portion of which were wagons, so let’s take a peek at this Avant:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Audi 100CS quattro Avant on eBay

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1998 Mercedes-Benz S600 7.0 AMG

I don’t think it is necessary to explain to those who understand.

That’s the only description from the selling dealer for today’s car. Granted, that was translated from Japanese, but it is the general gist of it. If you know you know, if you don’t, this isn’t the car for you. The iconic W140 Mercedes-Benz S600 punched out to 7.0 liters by AMG Japan and equipped with a bunch of other little special touches. In terms of 1990s sedans, this is up there. The price? Well, if you have to ask…

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Mercedes-Benz S600 7.0 AMG at Car Sensor

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2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS

The Porsche 718 Cayman GTS is one of the few new Porsche’s that launched with a thud. Everyone wanted the classic 3.4-liter flat-six, maybe even a 3.6-liter, but instead they were served up a turbocharged 2.5-liter flat-four. To make it even worse, it sounded like a Subaru WRX. Porsche owners don’t want Subaru sounds. The numbers on paper were mightily disappointing as well, given their performance in the real world was nearly identical to the 718 Cayman S. That means you paid over $12,000 more just to get the standard GTS stuff like brake-based torque vectoring, the Sport Chrono package, adaptive dampers with a lower ride height, 20-inch wheels, and sport seats that are otherwise optional on the Boxster S. In that light I suppose that was a good value? Either way, Porsche knew they screwed up so went back to the drawing board and thankfully gave us the GTS 4.0. However, that doesn’t mean the flat-four versions suddenly fell off the face of the earth.

Today, we have a 2018 up for sale in New York with the great color of Sapphire Blue Metallic and just 6,200 miles. But I hope you aren’t expecting a deal on this one.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS on eBay

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1995 BMW M3 Coupe

It seems fairly appropriate to take a peek at a particularly vibrant shade given the holiday, and the perfect choice would of course be BMW’s Daytona Violet. Like many of the other BMW ‘Easter Egg’ colors, it’s polarizing – you either hate it or you love it. I fall firmly into the latter camp, and though for a long time I hoped to own an Avus Blue M3 coupe, I’ve since changed my mind and decided that were I ever to own an E36, it must be full of purple passion.

About a year ago I looked at a pretty nice example, which was riding the wave of E36 popularity into the $20k price range. That has not abated since, with examples trading well over that amount – a Dakar Yellow ’95 with 92k miles just sold for $33,500 plus fees, for example. Today’s Daytona coupe has just 65k miles, manual Vader sport seats, and is claimed to have a relatively fresh mechanical overhaul. What does that add up to?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 BMW M3 Coupe on eBay

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1991 Audi V8 quattro Evolution

Evolution. That word sparks joy for a whole sect of automotive enthusiasts, whether they be of the Japanese Lancer-loving type or in the 90s German realm. It was in that time that we had Evolution models delivered from BMW, Mercedes-Benz, and Audi to homolgate equipment to use in the DTM. While the M3 and 190E 2.3-16 took most of the laurels, a fair amount of DTM fans forget that it was the V8 quattro – replete with wood trim – that took the 1990 ( Hans-Joachim Stuck) and 1991 (Frank Biela) crowns before its flat-plane crankshaft was deemed illegal.

In 1991 Audi introduced an Evolution model, which sprouted adjustable front and rear spoilers. That was pretty much the only dynamic change, but these Evolution models were also equipped with 17″ Bolero wheels for good measure. A claimed 500 were produced, but good luck finding them – they are more elusive than essentially every other Audi model in the modern era. One turned up for sale in Berlin, though – and despite the DTM laurels and Evolution nameplate, they’re surprisingly affordable:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi V8 quattro Evolution on Mobile.de

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1994 Mercedes-Benz S350 Hearse

It seems like once a year I run across a rather interesting hearse that makes you ask “What do you even do with it now?” An honest question given they only serve one person, but today I have another hearse that seems to go beyond the normal setup and deep into the excess. Let’s check it out.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Mercedes-Benz S350 Hearse on Auto Scout 24 CH

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2000 Mercedes-Benz E430 Sport

Back in the days the W210 Mercedes-Benz E-Class production, there was a model produced that didn’t exactly get all the headlines or fanfare, and that was the E430 Sport. For the 2000 through 2002 model years, you could option a E430 with the E55 AMG body kit. That meant much more aggressive bumpers, some cool side skirts, and circle fog lights that were unique to the E55. While all this was cool, Mercedes was smart enough not to offer the smoke taillights nor the signature 18″ AMG Monoblock wheels, as you had to settle for 17″ wheels. However, source a set of the Monoblocks, and you have a faux E55 to the untrained eye. Wouldn’t you know it, this is exactly what we have here with this 2000 up for sale in Massachusetts that has just 42,000 miles. I don’t want to spoil the party early, but this one might have some issues.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2000 Mercedes-Benz E430 Sport on eBay

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2003 Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMG

One of these more overlooked Mercedes-AMG models since the turn of the millennium was the very short-lived C209 CLK55 AMG coupe. You might be wondering how a car that ran from the 2003 to 2005 model year can be short-lived, but looking at the production numbers you see how rare they really are. In 2003, they sold a reasonable 761 cars here. 2004? Down to 509. The final year of 2005? Only 247. Considering there were roughly 350 Mercedes-Benz dealers in the US at that time, you were lucky to see one. Even though they are rare, there is not exactly much demand for them as they suffer from the curse of the CLK-Class. That is a thing totally made up by me, but let me explain.

Despite the CLK-Class looking like an E-Class coupe and Mercedes wanting you to think that, it rides on the W203 C-Class platform. That means a lot of shared parts, which isn’t a good thing when talking about the W203. Naturally, the drivetrain of the 5.4-liter M113 V8 with the 722.6 five-speed automatic is a gem, but the interior is a real letdown on these cars with the cheap plastic on almost everything you touch. Still, for this amount of money, who is to complain?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2003 Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMG on eBay

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1980 Mercedes-Benz 280SLC Euro-Spec

The SLC is really one of those cars that most of the time I ignore, but occasionally a really neat one pops up and grabs my attention. Sometimes that’s a cool 5.0 WRC homologation model, but I also like the base cars in European specification:

1980 Mercedes-Benz 280SLC Euro-Spec

Today we have another of these Euro models to consider, though this one decidedly looks more a child of the early 70s than the previous few I’ve looked at:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1980 Mercedes-Benz 280SLC Euro-Spec on eBay

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2002 Audi Allroad quattro 2.7T

Audi’s C5 allroad wasn’t the first tall all-wheel drive wagon to hit the market; AMC claimed that crown with the Eagle well before Audi’s Quattro even hit the market. But it somehow defined the luxury do-anything segment and was unique in the German marques; Audi brought massive amounts of computational power, height-adjustable air suspension, a wide-body flare kit, twin-turbocharged power and even a manual gearbox. It was awesome. It was popular. But, it broke so much that even MacGyver was left stranded.

Still, find a nice one and these offer a lot for relatively short money. They’re quick, comfortable, and capable. As long as you’re willing to do some wrenching and order lifetime warranty parts from FCP Euro, they can be made reasonably reliable. And there is still a pretty avid community of supporters, though truth told nice examples are dwindling in number.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Audi Allroad quattro 2.7T on eBay

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