2016 BMW M6 Coupe Competition Edition

The third-generation M6 is an interesting beast. Like prior M6s, they were effective mechanical twins of their M5 counterparts. However, the F-Series M6 introduced a new concept – the F06 M6 Gran Coupe – which seemed to follow the marketplace and was reasonably successful. Of course, like the prior E6x generation, there was also the F12 M6 convertible that proved to be popular as well. In total BMW sold the best part of 6,000 examples of them in North America – not a huge market share compared to the M3/4, but still a decent number for a high-end car.

The outsider – and slowest seller – was the M6 coupe. The F13 packed a wallop with a twin-turbocharged V8, and in LCI Competition form it kicked out 600 horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque. But these are some of the rarest models BMW has sold here – 1,619 pre-LCI coupes were sold in North America, and just 474 late examples were imported. Today we’re looking at one of the last brought here, but to add to the rarity it’s not just a Competition model, but it’s a Competition Edition coupe. These were produced to celebrate the end of F13 production as well as BMW’s racing success with the GT3 variant of the car. Production was limited to 100 models, which got special trim in one of two colors – Alpine White or Austin Yellow Metallic, the latter of which we see here. Just 40 were made in this color for the North American market, but despite that, they won’t destroy your bank account:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 BMW M6 Coupe Competition Edition on eBay

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2015 BMW i8

I closed out 2021 looking at the birth of BMW’s “real” M-car legacy with the M6, since the M1 was pretty much unattainable. It seems fitting to start of 2022 with BMW’s foray into electrification, then. One could argue that the reinvention of the 8-series moniker was a disservice to the original; I disagree. The E31 pioneered a new frontier for BMW, with electronics, a new design language and took BMW to a different market. There is no more fitting designation than the i8 in my mind. The slinky, futuristic coupe utilizes lightweight construction to keep the curb weight down; 3,200 lbs may not sound particularly lightweight, but keep in mind that the BRZ/FR-S twins were lauded for their light design and are only a few hundred pounds less without all of the heavy electric equipment and twin motors. Pushing the very aerodynamic lithe coupe are two motors that run together or separately – a 1.5 liter turbocharged inline-3 paired with a smaller version of the i3’s electric motor. The results of this combination are pretty astounding; a combined 357 horsepower results in 60 miles an hour in 3.8 seconds and a near effortless limited 155 m.p.h. top speed. Couple that with the ability to drive for around 20 miles with no assistance from the gasoline motor and return mid-40 mpgs, and the 911-like performance is truly impressive. No other car has yet come close to the combination of attributes the i8 offers.

When these cars rolled out now bordering on seven years ago, MSRP was thrown to the wind and dealer invoices rang in some $70,000 over sticker, with near $220,000 asking prices. While the i8 and i3 introduced BMW’s electric intentions, their more recent and impending offerings like the i4 are decidedly more mainstream. So for a bit more than the price of a loaded i4 M50, you can get into a much more exciting used i8, like today’s Protonic Blue Metallic example equipped with the Pure Impulse World package:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2015 BMW i8 on eBay

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1987 BMW M6

Though they’re the juggernaut of BMW performance today, the reality is that there were quite a few stumbling blocks and it took many years for BMW Motorsport GmbH to establish themselves as the benchmark for German performance. Many consider the M1 the genesis of BMW M, but in fact the brand was born nearly a decade earlier with the introduction of the 3.0 CSL. The high performance E9 was built together with BMW’s competition department, a relationship which ultimately resulted in the birth of BMW’s Motorsport division. A few years later, the new entity would give birth to an equally legendary creation, the 2002 Turbo. But when it came to the first car to carry the “M” badge, it was of course the legendary M1 with its motorsport derived M88/1 double overhead cam inline six screaming in the middle of the car. You’d think this recipe carried over to the sedan range, but that was not immediately the case. First, BMW produced the M535i in the E12 chassis. The follow-up E28 model of the same designation most remember was mostly an appearance package, but the E12 model was turned up over the rest of the range – but not with the M88; BMW instead relied on the M30 to power the M535i. Then, there was a year where nothing happened; the M1 was out of production, the E12 was replaced by the E28, and ostensibly BMW had no real performance models.

That was remedied at the 1983 Frankfurt Motor Show, where a juiced up version of the 635CSi was offered. It was labeled the M635CSi; but unlike the M535i, under the hood wasn’t the venerable M30 that powered the normal 635CSi. In its place, the Motorsport division decided to slot the M88, now with /3 designation; the result was 286 horsepower – a staggering figure at the time, considering that the contemporary Porsche 930 was considered fairly bonkers with a little over 300 horsepower and though it looked much larger, the early E24s only weighed about 200 lbs. more than the Porsche. Coupled with some aerodynamic tweaks, heavier duty suspension, brakes and larger wheels and tires, the result was the menacing presence worthy of the nickname “Shark”. For all intents and purposes, this was really the first “M” car for the masses. BMW brought its M lineup to the United States for 1987 with the renamed M6, and though power was down to 256 with the catalyst-equipped S38, these were still one of the fastest cars you could buy in a dealer lot that model year.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 BMW M6 on eBay

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1983 BMW 316

Picking up the reins from the very basic E21 315 model that was introduced some 40 years ago, the E30 316 was the entry-level model for the the newly introduced chassis in 1983. While the model introduced new styling, the basic 316 carried over the 1.6-liter M10 from the 315 model as a very basic entry-level edition.

There’s an appealing simplicity to these early no-frills cars, and this one has already been imported. Let’s take a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1983 BMW 316 on eBay

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1973 BMW 2002tii S14

Back in 2020, I took a look at series of cool customized 2002s:

1970 BMW 2002

Today’s car started life as a 2002tii, and had it be restored to pristine in its original configuration, it’d be worth a pretty penny. Instead, it’s gone all Dutch with a repaint in Inka as well as a 5-speed swap, custom interior trimmings, turbo-look flares and spoilers, and to top it all off, it’s got a screaming S14 under the hood. Let’s take a closer look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 BMW 2002tii S14 on eBay

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2000 BMW 540i Sport

Back in April I took a look at a post-LCI E39 540i Sport with the desirable 6-speed manual:

2002 BMW 540i Sport

Today’s earlier example looks great in hard-to-find Anthracite Metallic with the multi-piece BBS Style 19s. While it’s not a spring chicken, there looks to be a reasonable amount of value in this car. Let’s take a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2000 BMW 540i Sport 6-Speed on eBay

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1994 BMW M3 Coupe

Crazy though it may sound, this E36 – priced at $24,000 – may actually be a reasonable deal. Wind the clock back a few years, and that statement was inconceivable; E36s were relegated to the bargain basement of BMW M pricing. That’s not the case anymore, though, as pricing has been trending sharply upwards – recently a few non-Lightweight examples have crested $60,000 sales after fees. Hard to believe? Well, perhaps more a sign of the trends, but finding a neat and clean E36 is certainly no longer as easy as it once was, and early examples are – amazingly – able to be registered as antiques in more than a few states.

So here we are, with a very shouty Dakar Yellow ’94. And if you know E36 M3s, you know that a pre-’95 model year automatically means one important thing – European specification. Well, at least it should mean that. Let’s take a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 BMW M3 Coupe on eBay

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1994 BMW M5 Touring

BMW’s second generation M5 followed the same recipe as the outgoing E28; manual transmission, rear-drive, howling inline-6 under the hood. But the E34 was far from a copy of the car that was really credited with being the first super sedan. BMW upped with power first with the 3.6 liter version of the S38; though the increase in displacement was a scant 82 ccs, the result was impressive. BMW Motorsport GmbH fit a new cam, a higher compression head, and a new engine management system to yield 311 horsepower at a rev-busting 6,900 rpms. They weren’t done.

In 1992 M upped the capacity again, this time to just 5 cc shy of 3.8 liters. Even higher compression, a further revision in electronic management, and a few other odds and ends now netted 340 horsepower and 300 lb-ft of torque. Again, they weren’t done. Perhaps tired of Audi cornering the go-fast-5-door market with their 200 20V Avant, in 1992 BMW launched the M5 Touring. Production began in March 1992 and ran through 1995. All E34 M5 Tourings were left-hand drive 3.8 models, and a total of 891 were produced.

BMW opted not to bring the enlarged motor or the M Touring model to the United States, as the 540i took over the top rungs of North American production. But now legal for importation, these rare Ms are one of the more desirable models around:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 BMW M5 Touring on eBay

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2002 BMW M3 Coupe

This M3 sold for best offer under $37,900 on 11/22/2021.

A Phoenix Yellow M3 coupe? Damn straight I can’t look away. Back in May I looked at the most recent one after a string of a few others:

2004 BMW M3 Coupe

PYM cars continue to hit big numbers when they come up for sale, with a 44k mile 2001 6-speed coupe recently trading for $55,000 – close to its original sticker price. Today’s car has over double the mileage, but it’s also got a bit of a treat inside:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 BMW M3 Coupe on eBay

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1993 BMW 740i

Back in February, I took a look at the E32 range-topping 750iL:

1990 BMW 750iL

Shortly after that model year, though, BMW introduced two new models with V8s under the hood. Following mostly traditional naming conventions, the M60 3.0 and 4.0 V8s slotted in to the new 730i and 740i models. Their all-aluminum construction mean that they were not any heavier than the outgoing venerable six, while being shorter and more compact. Power on the M60B30 was respectable and in line with the M30B35 inline-six; 215 horsepower and 214 lb-ft of torque, while the bigger brother had 282 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque. That was only a few horsepower short of the V12, and with its much cheaper price and better fuel economy it was no surprise that it was a hit. The formula would be carried on for the next few generations of 7s, but it’s become more rare to see the early cars still floating around. Let’s take a look at this ’93:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 BMW 740i on eBay

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