1998 Volkswagen Jetta K2

I’m a pretty big VW nut, but when it comes to the A3 Jetta even I admit they’re just pretty darn boring. The Mk.2 Jetta had plenty of character for better or worse, but the third generation just seemed to be a bit lumpy and overweight in comparison. The crisp body lines were replaced by softer transitions that, well, just didn’t look special. And there was the engine; gone was the awesome twin-cam 16V 2.0 GLi, replaced by a single cam 2.0 8V in the normal Jettas that were snatched up by New Jersey college girls. Sure, there was the GLX VR6 model that continued the quick Jetta tradition, but it seemed that most of the time you heard a droning automatic 4-cylinder Jetta leaving the lights. And the build quality just wasn’t the best; memorably, a friend of mine purchased a brand new 1997 Jetta and I waxed it for him one day while he was at work. On my way to drop the car off, the sunroof broke in the open position. The car was two weeks old. So, it was ugly, slow and unreliable – and expensive. The normal Jetta bordered on $18,000 without many options in 1997, and the GLX model pushed you well into the 20s. Comparatively, the new Jetta stickers around $14,000 nearly two decades later. Towards the end of the A3’s run, though, Volkswagen upped the ante with some limited edition models. There was the Jetta GT, which featured 4-wheel disc brakes and fog lamps, along with a spoiler and unique alloys. But if you wanted to be the cool dude on campus, you got your parents to buy you the Jetta Trek or Jetta K2. As far as I could tell at the time, they were normal Jettas (and Golfs) with roof racks and a bike or skis/snowboard. “Meh”, I said, “just another poser Volkswagen”. But the limited edition A3s were a bit of a treat:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Volkswagen Jetta K2 on eBay

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1998 Volkswagen GTi VR6

Last week Paul wrote up a nice example of a Ginster Yellow GTi VR6 Driver’s Edition; one of what we’re coming to believe may be a dying breed. Like the 16 valve GTis that preceded the VR6, the third generation GTis were used, often quite aggressively, by their owners. Couple that with a tendency to have rust develop in the third generation Golfs and the number that have given their guts for VR swaps into earlier cars and you have a rapidly developing shortage of unmolested, cleaner examples of the GTi. Today’s example may be the rarest color on the GTi of this vintage; few that I’ve ever seen were specified in “Cool White” that is model is:

Year: 1998
Model: GTi VR6
Engine: 2.8 liter VR6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 144,252 mi
Price: $4,400 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Volkswagen GTi VR6 on eBay

1998 VW Golf GTI VR6

– Cool White Exterior w/Black Leather Interior

– 144K miles

– 5spd manual transmission with short shifter, new bushings, recently replaced clutch

– Passed NJ Inspection in October – good through 10/2015

– No CEL(check engine light), Airbag light or any other warning lights currently lit on dash (all bulbs are still in the cluster!)

– Timing chain/water pump were replaced (127k miles), Battery (130k miles), Neuspeed Plug Wires and coil pack (132k miles), Mass Airflow sensor (144k miles), PCV Valve (144k miles), Air Filter (144k miles), VW Spec Single Tip Copper Spark Plugs (144k miles), Miscellaneous vaccuum lines (144k miles), Catalytic Converter (144k miles), RainX wipers (144k miles)

– Modifications include: MK3.5 Cabrio 3 spoke steering wheel w/airbag, Bosal Exhaust (downpipe back, including bosal catalytic converter), slotted front rotors, Pioneer radio/cd player, Polk Audio component speakers, smoked side markers, clear long turn signals and fog lights, Koni Lowering Springs (front struts, strut mounts and tie rod ends need to be replaced)

The car is in very good condition for the year. If you are familiar with Volkswagen’s you know that a white MK3 GTI VR6 is hard to come by in nice condition. I drive the car regularly and it has been very reliable. It pulls strong, as to be expected for a VR6. However, as with any car from 1998 there are some imperfections including some minor dings, scratches, ect. VW’s from 1994-1999 are prone to rust issues on the floors, hatch, strut towers and gas cap area. I can say that there is no rust in any of these areas. However, there is a minor spot that has bubbled on the passenger side quarter panel and some on the very bottom of the rocker panels (covered by the side skirts). Please see pictures. In trying to be as honest and upfront as possible, I will describe all flaws with car. Minor separation on one seam of the driver seat (approx 2-3″), cracked end cap on passenger side skirt ($5 used), very small chip in windshield (approx 1/2″ and has not spread over the past 6 months), needs front suspension work (new front struts – $95, new VR6 strut mounts – $40 and new tie rod ends – $30).

Unfortunately, a change in needs (bathroom remodel at my house) is forcing the sale of this car. If you have any questions or would like any additional pictures, please contact me prior to bidding.

There are a few issues present with this car; rust is creeping through in a few spots which seems typical for the Mk. 3 chassis. Additionally, there is a reported need for some attention to the suspension. However, the owner has recently undertaken a fair amount of vehicle maintenance which is certainly nice to have checked off. The modifications aren’t extensive and could be easily reversed if desired. Overall, the car presents very well, though I think it’s interesting that it seems to wear early VR6 wheels instead of the 1998-spec Speedline wheels; the same wheels on the Ginster Yellow GTi Paul wrote up. Sourcing those wheels isn’t impossible but they’re not very common, so you may need to do a refinish once all is said and done. The asking price is $4,400; that’s nearly a $1,000 more than the Ginster model sold for recently, and that car looked a bit cleaner and had less miles. We seem to agree here that the sweet spot for these GTis still is in the $3,000 to $4,000 range, but if you’re interested, get one while you can – we’re pretty sure they’re going the way of the dodo and will be appreciating soon.

-Carter