Motorsports Monday: 1988 Audi 200 quattro Trans Am

One of the things I love the most about Audi is that for some time they liked to do things differently. Now, if you’re Porsche and you’re able to build a reputation around that insistence to do things differently through racing, then you can be a successful company. As such, the closely linked cousin Audi was taken racing by some of the same team from Porsche. The first big attempt in the 1980s was the push to win the World Rally Championship with their new Quattro model. Highlighting turbocharged technology coupled with a semi-revolutionary all-wheel drive system, the Quattro was a positive sensation until the mid-1980s and the death of Group B. Audi then took on Group A with the non-turbo Coupe quattro briefly, and also enjoyed some unlikely success rallying with their 200 sedan. But even success in World Rally Championship events wasn’t enough of a reputation boost for what lay ahead of Audi next, as 60 Minutes highhandedly nearly took the company right out of the marketplace. In order to rebuild the reputation of the company in the U.S., Quattro guru Jo Hoppen convinced Audi to go racing in the SCCA Trans-Am series. Headlining that series were tube-frame V8 behemoths that outwardly laughed as a production based luxury sedan with a measly 2.1 turbocharged inline-5 hanging way out the front pulled up to grid. It turned out they didn’t laugh too long:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Audi 200 quattro Trans Am at Auto Collections

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Motorsports Monday: 1972 Porsche 911 RSR Tribute

This past weekend was the Goodwood Festival of Speed; if you missed it once again, or have no idea what I’m talking about but are reading this, it’s something you desperately need to examine in your motoring life. There are historic races held around the world, and there are motoring events held around the world, so one more held on some rich dude’s driveway shouldn’t be a big deal, right? Wrong, it’s perhaps the single most unique and impressive automotive event in the world. The FoS reunites classic race cars often with their original drivers, driven in anger up the 1 mile hill of Lord March’s drive. It’s tougher than it would seem to be, and since it’s inception it’s attracted every major automobile manufacturer and gathered some of the most impressive machines ever made. From the first race cars to modern Formula One racers, the Festival of Speed is a celebration of all things automotive. For example, this past weekend, Mazda was the featured marque – but they also had gathered 7 of the 8 Mercedes-Benz 300SLRs ever built, and had Sir Stirling Moss, Hans Herrmann, Jochen Mass, Sir Jackie Stewart, and many other notable champions driving four of them up the hill. That was one of many priceless convoys parading by motorsports enthusiasts; it’s simply the largest collection of the most significant race cars ever made in the world coupled with the historic champions that drove them. Why talk about this in this tribute listing? Well, look closely at the lower portion of the door, and you’ll see that the builder of this 1972 Porsche 911 – which tribute’s Hurley Haywood’s Brumos-sponsored 1973 Sebring RSR – went so far as to include the Goodwood FoS number sticker from when the car appeared:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1972 Porsche 911 RSR Tribute on eBay

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1981 Porsche 924 Carrera GTR

The late 1970s and early 1980s were a trans-formative time for Porsche. After a long string of successes with the Porsche 911 and 917 on the race track, they were moving into new territory with a series of front engined cars. Not only were these cars appearing on the race track, though; Porsche intended the 928 and 924 to be the replacements for its aging 911/912 lineup. The result was a special time for water-cooled fans, as Porsche spent a considerable amount of time and resources in between the end of the 917 project and the beginning of the new 956 project on the front engined 924. In order to tie the model to performance and wins on the track, Porsche undertook an ambitious racing schedule, entering the 924 in everything from showroom production-based “D-Production” in SCCA to the World Rally Championship and Le Mans. The resulting lineup of impressive turbocharged 924s have become legendary, but ultimately they’re much more rare to come across than their 911/934/935 counterparts. Still, in the early 1980s they were cutting edge – 2,000 lbs, 400+ horsepower and massive flares hiding 935-spec BBS center-lock magnesium wheels. Sound awesome? You better believe it:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1981 Porsche 924 Carrera GTR on eBay

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