1995 Porsche 911 Race Car

Race-prepped cars exist within their own market and are notoriously difficult to correctly evaluate and price. Much of this difficulty arises from the simple fact that many racers have specific preferences or builds in mind and it might be rare to come across a car that checks enough boxes to make the purchase worthwhile, at least at a cost that also makes sense to the seller. From a simple market perspective, in the case of vintage racers, there are usually a few transactions or other benchmarks upon which reasonable decision making can be based, but for a newer model such as this 1995 Porsche 911 there may be few relevant comparables. The 993 racer featured here falls in the middle ground of the race-prepped spectrum. While it has upgraded suspension and a fully race-prepped interior, it has retained its stock motor, though shorter gear ratios have been implemented to improve acceleration.

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1996 Porsche 911 Turbo

The collector market has been in love with air-cooled Porsches for some time now. Make the car an air-cooled 911 Turbo and prices can really start to escalate. Thus, as the last model of the air-cooled 911 Turbo the 993 Turbo tends to be held in especially high regard. The 993 Turbo utilized a refined version of the 3.6 liter flat-six found in the 964 Carrera and strapped on twin turbochargers that raised power to more than 400 hp. It was also the first 911 Turbo to utilize all-wheel drive. Though the Carrera 4 had debuted with the introduction of the 964, Porsche chose to refrain from using that system for the 964 Turbo. Even with the added weight of the all-wheel drive system the 993 Turbo still tends to be quicker than the 964. These were Porsche’s final expression of their turbo-charged air-cooled boxer engine, which brings us to the car featured here: a Polar Silver 1996 Porsche 911 Turbo located in Florida.

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1970 Porsche 911T

Throughout these pages, I have extolled the virtues of Porsche’s 912 for its simplicity married to the classic 911 design. Here we have the car that effectively became the replacement for the 912 as Porsche’s entry-level rear-engined sports car, following the cessation of 912 production in 1969. While a 911T does not come at quite the cost savings of the 912 it nonetheless offers the most reasonable cost for anyone who must have a vintage long-hood 911 and values seem destined to appreciate at a steady rate that easily eclipses the 912. The 911T was first introduced as the entry-level 911 in 1967 featuring a 2.0 liter flat-six engine delivering 110 hp to the rear wheels through a standard 4-speed or optional 5-speed manual transmission. In 1970 engine displacement was increased to 2.2 liters with an appreciable rise in power to 125 hp. With only 2240 pounds to propel, performance of the 911T is capable, if not brisk, but still provides the driving dynamics and characteristics so highly desired by Porsche enthusiasts. The example featured here, a restored Slate Gray 1970 Porsche 911T with 5-speed manual transmission, comes to us from our friends at EuroWerkz.

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1988 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet

Paul and I were talking this past weekend about how there may be no other car more indicative of wild ’80s styling than a 930 Slantnose Cabriolet. The flared wheel arches, pop-up headlights, massive tail, side grills, and all of this on a cabriolet. The very shape of the car screams 1980s. Top it all off with the driving dynamics of a 930 and these cars had it all! And what do you know, after that discussion one came up for sale. The car featured here, a Grand Prix White 1988 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet puts all of that on vivid display. A car like this helped defined childhood wonder for those of us who grew up in this period and is certain to have graced more than one bedroom wall poster. With just over 41K miles this factory Slantnose shows very little wear and is certain to provide someone with a nice investment opportunity.

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Double Take: Rare color Porsche 911SC

Porsche has long offered a wide variety of colors to suit the palettes of its buyers and from time to time we come across these cars for sale. Late last week I wrote up a Talbot Yellow 911SC with a relatively high price that I figured was in large part due to the color choice. Talbot Yellow has that nice combination of being both rare and also eye-catching. Since writing up that car, we’ve come across two more examples in rare colors so this seemed like as good a time as any to take a look at what the market might bear for 911s that come in colors other than the standard Red, Black, and Silver. The first one is a restored 1980 Porsche 911SC in a very period-correct choice of Cashmere Beige.

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1994 Porsche 911 Speedster

The Speedster is one of those iconic Porsches held in consistently high regard by many fans of the marque and which Porsche has released periodically as a means to celebrate its history and to provide its buyers with a chance at experiencing that history. While the original Speedster was intended as a budget weekend-racer, subsequent versions have tended to come at a premium relative to its standard counterparts. For the 1994 release, Porsche based the Speedster off of the 964 body and even offered a clubsport version to further solidify the relationship the car shared with the original 356. With less than 1000 total 964 Speedsters built, and almost half of those coming to the US, these remain pretty rare cars and tend to be bought up by collectors. The example featured here is a 1994 Porsche 911 Speedster in Guards Red over Black. With less than 6K miles on the clock this Speedster presents in nearly like-new condition both inside and out; the seats hardly look like they’ve been sat in!

To me, the 964 Speedster is a more aesthetically pleasing version relative to the 1989 Speedster, which derived its looks largely from the 930. The curves of the 964 body simply fit the lines of the Speedster very well and offer an appearance that is more akin to that of the 356.

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1980 Porsche 911SC

This particular car intrigues me so I’ll get right to it. Here we have a 1980 Porsche 911SC with a little under 60K miles. The intriguing part to me, though, is the color: Talbot Yellow over Brown. We simply do not come across many of these cars. I’m always a fan of bright colors on particular cars, even though for my own car I almost always choose black. My personal contradictions aside, there is a particular allure to such a popping color and while not every owner enjoys the lack of subtlety these cars provide there are few that would deny that these cars represent something a little more special than what we get from most of the popular color options. Talbot Yellow over Brown is definitely a period-correct choice and sure to please many enthusiasts looking for a 911SC that stands apart from the crowd.

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2002 Porsche 911 Turbo

The more I write about these cars, the more they have grown on me. Like many, I was never a huge fan of the body design of the 996, but I have gradually come to admire these cars over time. I will never like the headlights, but the rest of the shape bothers me far less than it once did and for any buyer’s performance dollars the 996TT is seriously tough to beat. I especially like a black 996TT, like the one featured here: a Black on Black 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo that clocks in with a mere 6,200 miles. While a standard 996TT is hardly a slouch, this one has had some engine work that’s sure to make what was already a quick car, even quicker still. Thankfully, the car retains its stock appearance, something that anyone shopping for a 996TT knows, sadly, is not always the case.

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1991 Porsche 928 S4

It’s sometimes interesting to consider what might have been. Had the 928 superseded the 911 as Porsche’s flagship model, then would we still consider the marque the way in which we do today? Perhaps the 911 would have become an even more hardcore machine primarily restricted to variants such as the GT2 and GT3 while the 928 became an exquisitely refined GT in a vein similar to an Aston Martin. Might Porsche have become a niche vehicle like the Aston as well? Who knows? What we do know is that production of the 928 spanned nearly 20 years and encompassed parts of three decades. Furthermore, remarkably, it remained reasonably similar throughout the model’s life, especially in its appearance. It is a testament to the original design that so few refinements were even necessary and the 928 still looks good today! The car featured here is a fairly low mileage 1991 Porsche 928 S4 located in California. The 928 S4 was produced from 1987-1991 and featured a 5.0 liter V8 delivering 316 hp to the rear wheels. For the final two years of its production the S4 was only offered with a 4-speed automatic as the 928 GT essentially became the sport version of the 928 and replaced the manual version of the S4.

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1964 Porsche 356C Sunroof Coupe

I wrote last week about the price of nostalgia and while that post was concerned primarily with the cost of a 911 from the 1980s, we can begin to appreciate our nostalgic yearnings quite a bit more if we rewind further. The 356 takes us back to Porsche’s roots and that very fact imbues these cars with a spirit that no other model could replicate. Vintage cars such as these are, in a way, history lessons; displays of an ideal that, especially in the case of the 356, have lead to years of development and continued success. The specific example featured here is a restored, numbers matching, 1964 Porsche 356C Sunroof Coupe. By modern standards, the lines of the 356 seem almost pudgy, but underneath those curves lies a light and graceful machine.

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