1986 Porsche 911 Turbo DP 935 – REVISIT

After failing to meet reserve last time it was auctioned in August, you have another opportunity to turn the boost up to “11” on this 1986 911 Turbo DP935. The modifications and look can be a bit polarizing but this one has been updated nicely and it’s too garish in the realm of heavily modified 1980s cars. Last time there were two bids that hit $95,000 – this time, the seller opened the bidding at $95,000 with the reserve still on. I don’t expect it to sell at this amount this time around either – these DP cars take a special kind of buyer and some of the updates have unfortunately taken away some of the originality. What would you pay for this turbocharged wonder?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 911 Turbo DP935 on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site August 19, 2014:

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Week in Review

Welcome back to Week in Review, where we recap the last few weeks of vehicles we have featured:

The 1981 BMW 320i did not sell, failing to meet its reserve at $2,175: Closed Auction | Our Post on this Car

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Über Rarität: 1999 Alpina B3 3.2 Cabriolet

When BMW upped its game in the E36 chassis with the introduction of the M3, specialty tuner Alpina answered with the B3 3.0 and later 3.2 in step with BMW. The successor of the slightly less powerful B6 model, the B3 kept many of the same improvements to the E36 chassis – unique stabilizers, springs and shocks, and larger brakes. Inside the B3 received the normal Alpina-style shift knob, steering wheel and seats, and in their typical style Alpina provided unique front and rear spoilers along with their own badging. Of course, the package was rounded out by some of the best looking wheels ever fitted to a BMW. While the B3 was down on power to the European M3 3.2, it wasn’t really much slower – again in typical Alpina fashion, the car was tuned to make the most of the power that was available rather than just provide a shockingly high output number. A reported 1,000 of these ultra-exclusive B3s were produced, with about 2/3rds of those being the earlier 3.0 model. With only 342 of the 3.2 produced, the pool is already very exclusive on these. Add a manual transmission when most are automatic, special order Dakar Yellow paint and a cabriolet model, and this is among the most exclusive Alpinas ever made.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1999 Alpina B3 3.2 Cabriolet on eBay

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1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

In 1984, when the 911 Carrera debuted, you might forgive the layman for not realizing a new model had come. By all appearance, it didn’t seem like anything had changed, though a careful observer would note the now integrated fog lights. A very careful observer might also notice that the rear decklid was adorned with a Carrera badge. Porsche had resurrected the Carrera name for this new model, a change that has continued through today as every subsequent naturally-aspirated 911 has worn that same badge. The most significant change to the car also lay under that badge: the new higher compression 3.2 liter flat-six that brought with it both increased performance and also increased economy. The 911 Carrera would be the last of the classic 911 design and as such has been a favorite of many Porsche enthusiasts. They aren’t typically the great value that they once were and excellent examples tend to be snapped up quickly, both points serving as testimony to how enjoyable these great 911s remain even today. The car featured here is a 1984 Grand Prix White Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet, located in Santa Barbara, with just 40,979 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

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Price Fixing? BMW 1M Roundup

BMW followed the age old recipe for the 1M and enthusiasts responded. Put a big engine in a small car, flare the arches a bit and slip on some wide rubber but keep the price in the range of mere mortals. What’s not to like about the 1M then? Well, they didn’t make many – 740 were imported, making it more rare than the previously rare E28 and E24 M models. That created an artificial demand right out of the box, and unfortunately these cars hit the market at the same point that the European collector car market really started taking off. That means that these cars have suffered effectively zero depreciation since new – rare for any car, but especially for the small sport sedan market. In fact, not only have they not depreciated, you could have bought one of these cars new in 2011, drove it moderately for the past 3 years, and you could have sold it for a profit today. The 1M, in all of its 335 horsepower twin-turbocharged goodness, hit the market at around $47,000 in 2011 – add a few options in and you were around $50,000 for most. Available in only three colors, these limited production cars have a cornered market and are piggybacking on the value increase of the 1980s M-cars – the spiritual predecessors of this car. Today, there are no less than 7 1Ms on Ebay, mostly in the $57,000 range. It seems almost like price fixing – we often see a wide spread of values even on very similar cars, but these 1Ms are all around the same price regardless of color, miles or number of owners. Which is the one you’d want?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 BMW 1M on eBay

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