2005 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe

A couple weeks ago I featured this Speed Yellow 2005 C4S Coupe. It appeared to be an exceptional example of what is a generally unloved model. I stated in that post that I think bright colors really work in the 996’s favor when it comes to maximizing the attractive qualities of its exterior. However, not everyone wants a brightly colored exterior and Speed Yellow is about as bright as they come. Also, as much as I liked that C4S it was very expensive with a price well into good 996TT territory.

Here I hope to remedy those two problems. This is the same model 911, from the same model year right at the end of 996 production, so you get what is for me a better looking 996 and the sort of usability that always has made the C4S a worthy candidate for daily driver duties should that be your desire. Obviously it’s nearly the polar opposite in color. I’ll admit I could do without the tint, especially of the rear lenses, but otherwise where a Speed Yellow 911 will turn every head, this black one should allow you to cruise by (mostly) unnoticed. At 20,086 miles, the mileage is still quite low but it’s priced almost $20K less. That’s a lot of money for Speed Yellow and a few less miles.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe on eBay

1969 Porsche 911E Coupe

It’s tough to tell, but this is a Bahama Yellow 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe. When first looking at it I thought that had to be an error. Or, at least, I thought it wasn’t actually painted Bahama Yellow even if that was its original color. The color looks more like Sand Beige (or something along those lines). As I looked more closely, however, it does appear to be the case that it is Bahama Yellow – the pictures taken inside the garage do a better job of showing the color than the outdoor photos. Bahama Yellow is on the darker side of yellow, though it is by no means a dark color, just darker for yellow. It also has a slight brown tint to it, which helps explain why it might look like a darker version of beige when photographed entirely in the shade. I suppose all of this is to say that this 911 actually is quite a bit better than I initially thought and I initially thought it looked really good!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe on eBay

1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

Just beautiful. I can think of no other appropriate way to describe this Iris Blue Metallic 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe. It isn’t perfect, it isn’t entirely original, nor is it an ultra-low-mileage garage queen. It’s just beautiful.

The version of Iris Blue Porsche gave us in the ’80s – note that it did change dramatically when the color came back in the ’90s – is one of those shades of blue that we’ve seen variants of throughout the 911’s history and it always captivates. It exists on the lighter side of the spectrum, which differentiates it from other great metallic blues like Gemini Blue and Minerva Blue, but it makes no sacrifices to its appearance. For those who are a fan of that lighter shade it makes for a very nice option. On a classic 911 it’s a crowd pleaser.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

Double Take: Grand Prix White Carrera Targas – Which 5-speed Will You Have?

If you find yourself desiring a classic 911 from the ’80s you’re immediately presented with a few decisions. The first of which, while seemingly the most straightforward, can actually present the biggest quandary: which model do you get, the 911SC or the 3.2 Carrera? Both are great and their similarities in design and performance are such that either model should fulfill your desires. But let’s say you’re set on the 3.2 Carrera. You want the improved performance and slightly more refined feel. You still have one more decision to make: would you rather find one of the earlier models (1984-1986) utilizing the long-standing 915 5-speed transmission or a later model (1987-1989) with the newer G50 5-speed transmission? It seems a minor detail, but the transmissions do make a difference. Most drivers find the G50 to be the nicer shifting of the two and it is a more stout transmission to begin with, a point that certainly could make a difference 30 years from new. However, the G50 also is heavier and typically the prices for the later Carreras, in part because of that transmission, tend to be higher. If you’re thinking strictly about adding one to a collection the G50 probably is the one to get. For a driver? It’s not so straightforward.

Generally speaking, unless you’re very patient most of these decisions will be made for you since you’re typically best off by buying the best available option from these years. A well sorted 911SC is likely to bring you more joy and fewer headaches than a 3.2 Carrera with some issues. Sometimes, however, the options are such that you really can have your choice and, in fact, in our case here your choice really is distilled down almost completely to the different transmissions.

Here we have two Grand Prix White 3.2 Carrera Targas with pretty similar mileage, pretty similar asking prices, and seemingly very similar condition.…

Viper Green 2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4S

Anyone who has been reading these pages for a while will know that I am a huge fan of the 911 Targa. My first experiences with a Porsche of any kind were in a Targa and I guess that first love has remained with me. I love the aesthetics and the versatility. I even love Porsche’s initial forays into the model’s development with the kind-of-crazy Soft-window Targa. I loved them right up until 1996 when the design was modified for the 993. The Targa basically had become a giant sunroof.

Thankfully that all changed in 2014 when Porsche returned the Targa to its true form. It wasn’t all roses. At its release the Targa was only available as either a 4 or 4S, i.e. no rear-drive Targa, but the Targa was back and it looked great! It fit the design of the 991 well. The new Targa allowed electronics to do all of the work so the top could be removed without too much fuss. You do have to come to a stop though. The horror.

Even with the Targa’s return I have seen very few of them on the road. So I guess the least loved of the 911s will remain that way. Maybe buyers aren’t sure what it is? I doubt anyone would fail to stop and look at this one: a Viper Green 2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4S, located in New York, with 7-speed manual transmission and 6,396 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Viper Green 2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4S on eBay

1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe

I love a red interior. Even the very bright red interiors. Porsche has long made such interiors available to those who like them. I also am a big fan of the 964. Curiously, I’m not sure I’ve ever featured a 964 with a red interior. Well, at least, not a standard 964. I think there have been a couple ultra-rare models, but I won’t count those.

At last I have found one: this Black 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe, located in Los Angeles, with a Matador Red interior and 105,420 miles on it. I don’t think I’ve seen Matador Red before, not knowingly anyway. It looks great with just the right amount of brightness. While it may only be the lighting in these pictures it doesn’t appear quite as bright as some of Porsche’s other offerings like Can-can Red or Lobster. I think for most that likely gives it a nice balance. For those who find a black car to be a bit dull, perhaps this interior will help liven things up. It’s quite beautiful.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe on eBay

Signal Yellow 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

I wasn’t sure I wanted to post another yellow 911. I’ve come across a lot that I’ve liked lately and while I might love the color, it’s definitely way too bright for most people. The appeal is somewhat limited and that’s not exactly what I’m going for here. In the end, I couldn’t pass this up. It’s probably my favorite Porsche color and the GT3 RS is my favorite of the water-cooled models. It’s also been spec’d pretty nicely and in a manner I might choose myself. As an ultimate 911 it’s close to perfect.

This is a paint-to-sample Signal Yellow 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS with radio delete, a whole host of deviated stitching in the interior, and 3,055 miles on it. While perhaps a strange thing to say about a car at this price, I also think it is priced very reasonably.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Signal Yellow 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS on eBay

2005 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe

A funny thing has been happening recently: I’ve begun to be attracted to the 996. The general design is one I never was a fan of during production and I can’t say those feelings ever changed. Yet here I am unable to take my eyes off of another 996. I do think there are some caveats. It is the slightly altered bodywork of the Turbo, the C4S, and the GT3 that I find very good looking. The standard 996 design still leaves me cold. And the interior is still mostly terrible. But I do find the peculiarities of the design and the way those come through on certain models to be quite alluring. They aren’t clean lines and I actually like that. The 997 certainly fixed much of this, and the 991 extended that even further, but perhaps it all became too clean. Perhaps following upon the beauty of the 993 Porsche thought they needed to make things a little uglier, a little more interesting. I don’t know, but I’m starting to think it worked.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe on eBay

Paint-to-Sample 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa M491 Turbolook

After seemingly going a while without seeing one it now appears Turbolook 911s are all coming out of the woodwork. I’ve posted a couple that I particularly liked, one of which specifically because it was a coupe as those still aren’t coming around very often. It is still the case that most of those we see are the earlier, and slightly less desirable, models with the 915 5-speed transmission. There are fewer of the later G50 transmission models with the ’89MY naturally leading the way in rarity.

But here we have one of those later models. It’s not a Coupe, but still has plenty of appeal in its own right: a paint-to-sample Marine Blue Metallic 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa with the M491 package and 81,713 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Paint-to-Sample 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa M491 Turbolook on eBay

1992 Porsche 911 Carrera Cup

Normally I would post this car as one of our Motorsports Monday posts, but since this listing is set to end on Monday that wouldn’t be terribly effective. So today will have to do. Regardless, I expect it still will be available after Monday as well.

This model should need little introduction, but for those unfamiliar with them this is 1 of the 45* U.S. Edition 964 Carrera Cup cars Porsche imported in 1992. The idea was that these cars would all compete in support races for the CART series. Alas, sponsorship for the series couldn’t be secured and these cars were left without a purpose. Porsche, however, had other ideas, converted them to road legal specs, and sold them to customers anyway. In most ways these served as a replacement for the Carrera RS, which the US never received. As the ad below notes some of those were returned to race trim with full roll cage and stripped interior. This is one of those cars.

*A quick about the numbers: there were 45 Carrera Cup cars imported for the race series, so I’m not quite sure what the 1 of 25 mentioned in the ad is in reference to. Perhaps the number of cars reverted to race trim?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera Cup on eBay