2012 Porsche Cayman R

2012 Porsche Cayman R

I really don’t feature the Porsche Cayman often enough. It’s not that I don’t like them, I like them a lot. I think they just fall into that world of newer machines that we see so many of that it becomes easy to pass them by for more rare alternatives from earlier years. The same happens with the 911 since I’ll feature very few of the water-cooler models and when I do it is almost always the 996TT or GT3.

When I come across a Cayman R the decision is much easier as these possess the sort of rarity and performance that immediately makes us take notice. The R provides a glimpse of everything the Cayman could be and serves as a precursor to the current GT4. As a lightened and more powerful version of the Cayman S, the R takes an already well-balanced machine and turns everything up. Creature comforts are a little more limited though for those who like A/C and a radio they can be added back. Even still the R makes for a wonderfully fun drive and hell I think they look pretty great too!

The one we see here comes in a really pretty Basalt Black over Red combination and sits with just 12,000 miles on it. The asking price is quite high, but the option list is quite extensive so if you’re looking for one that checked a lot of the boxes this may be it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2012 Porsche Cayman R on Rennlist

Year: 2012
Model: Cayman R
Engine: 3.4 liter flat-6
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: 12,000 mi
Price: $75,000

The car is black with red full leather and has a manual transmission, bucket seats, sports exhaust, sport chrono among many other options. Currently has a little over 12,000 miles and I am the original owner.

Feature Listing Double Take: Kachel Motor Company’s 2006 Porsche Cayman S and 2007 Cayman S 3.8

Feature Listing Double Take: Kachel Motor Company’s 2006 Porsche Cayman S and 2007 Cayman S 3.8

While the Porsche 986 Boxster might have been the car that saved Porsche with its massive popularity, the 987-derived Cayman was what made the mid-engine design popular with track enthusiasts. Especially in more potent “S” form, the Cayman is a giant killer with sublime vehicle dynamics and plenty of punch even without a turbo. The 987 refresh in 2005 fixed many of the perceived visual faults of the 986 Boxster design with a slant towards a more aggressive look. The Coupe added a smooth, flowing hatchback line to the 997-inspired exterior, creating a lightweight, 7/8ths scale mid-engine 911. That it was less expensive than the traditional flat-6 lineup didn’t hurt, either. It was, and remains, a hit.

It was no surprise then that immediately these Caymans became popular with track enthusiasts and racers alike, spawning their own race series in the PCA. But you don’t need to fork over $100,000 for one of the rare Napleton Interseries cars to have a lot of fun at the track, as Kachel Motor Company proves with this duo of Cayman S racers:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2006 Porsche Cayman S on Panjo

Motorsports Monday: 2008 Porsche Cayman S Turbo

Motorsports Monday: 2008 Porsche Cayman S Turbo

As Spring 2017 officially kicks off today, my thoughts inevitably turn towards the track. While race series at Daytona, Sebring, Formula 1 (final testing, at least) and even Goodwood have already commenced, as I look out my window there’s still a layer of snow covering the ground and temperatures have barely crept past freezing. It certainly doesn’t feel like Spring yet, but that doesn’t mean that preparation for heading to the track can’t begin. And though I dearly love tracking my Audi Coupe GT and it’s racked up some serious mileage on the race courses of New England, I can’t help but think that maybe it’s time for something newer. Maybe something like a Porsche Cayman, the “affordable” way into a track-friendly performance Porsche:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Porsche Cayman S Turbo on eBay

Motorsports Monday: 2009 Porsche Cayman S Interseries

Motorsports Monday: 2009 Porsche Cayman S Interseries

Porsche history has always been intrinsically linked with racing since before they were even a company. From Mercedes-Benz to Auto Union and later Cisitalia, Porsche offered world-beating designs prior to establishment of its own independent racing heritage. Since the 1950s, they’ve never looked back, and every successive generation has their own legends that were born. For my father, it was the 908 and 917, while I grew up with the turbocharged whistle of the 956 and 962 dominating race tracks. To capitalize on this nostalgia, coupled with more gentleman drivers heading to the track every weekend than there ever have been, Porsche’s lineup has increasingly focused on track-biased cars. But that hasn’t stopped some from going a few steps further, and Napelton Porsche launched an interesting idea just before the turn of the decade.

Why not create a race series of equal cars, slap historic liveries on them, and hit the track? The Interseries was just that, with door to door action pitting the iconic color combinations of Porsche history at the hands of mere mortals. From the Salzburg 917 that first took Porsche to the Le Mans title to the unmistakable Rothmans colors, each of these cars wore a bit of what made the marque a legend for so many people. Everyone has their favorite design, so this series offered Porschephiles a veritable cornucopia of visual pleasure. Today, one of these cars has come up for sale:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2009 Porsche Cayman S Interseries on eBay

2012 Porsche Cayman R

2012 Porsche Cayman R

From seemingly the moment it released the Cayman Porsche was criticized for holding it back so as not to outclass the 911. As we often heard, the Cayman’s inherently better balanced mid-engine layout should easily be able to outperform Porsche’s icon, if only Porsche would truly unleash it and give it a proper engine. Regardless of this criticism, the Cayman has been widely praised; it followed in the long footsteps of Porsche’s racing history providing excellent performance and refinement in the same package. With the release of the Cayman R criticism was abated. With the new Cayman GT4 we have a glimpse of what the Cayman truly can be. Here we have an example of the former, a Speed Yellow 2012 Porsche Cayman R, located in Texas, with 12,726 miles on it. The Cayman R didn’t really add much in the horsepower department – gaining only 10 hp over the standard Cayman S – but when combined with its lighter weight – some 120 fewer pounds than the Cayman S – the results began to take shape. Marry extra power and lighter weight with more performance-oriented suspension tuning and the Cayman R stood apart from its mid-engined siblings and finally bit at the heels of the 911. Was the R akin to the 911 GT3 RS in its track focus? Not quite, but it pointed in that direction and gave many critics what they had clamored for.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2012 Porsche Cayman R on eBay

2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder – REVISIT

2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder – REVISIT

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The 2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder we featured back in November remains up for sale. I said in my original feature that the price appeared to be on the high end, but this seller has ignored that – while also ignoring that previous ads have failed to result in a sale – and raised the asking price of this Boxster by an additional $1K. It’s a bold strategy. Let’s see if it pays off.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site November 24, 2015:

2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder

2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder

We know that Porsche likes to remember its successes. And, of course, the best (and generally most lucrative) way for a marque to showcase that remembrance is with a special edition model. Typically, Porsche produces these special editions for the 911, but there have been a few for the Boxster as well and we saw quite a few of them as the 987 model run neared its end. Of the various special editions of the Boxster released at this time the Boxster RS60 Spyder was the one that Porsche used as a commemoration. In this case it was to commemorate their victory at the 12 Hours of Sebring in 1960. The winning car that day was the Porsche 718 RS Spyder. The 718 was an important racer for Porsche capable of competing with the more powerful Ferraris in the Targa Florio and further establishing Porsche’s name among racing’s elite. For its commemorative model, production was capped at – you guessed it – 1960 units and like many of Porsche’s special editions the “specialness” primarily came in the guise of a unique GT Silver Metallic exterior over a Carrera Red interior that was intended to match the look of the 718 RS Spyder itself. These cars did receive a bump in power thanks to a new exhaust – bringing power up to 303 hp, 8 more than the standard 295 hp of the Boxster S – but overall there were no significant alterations to power or weight. For fans of Porsche’s racing history the RS60 Spyder provides another opportunity to experience that connection, even if only in its most basic sense.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder on eBay

2012 Porsche Cayman R

2012 Porsche Cayman R

The cynic might remark that the Porsche Cayman R is exactly what the Cayman could, and should, have been from the very beginning if Porsche hadn’t neutered it so as to protect the 911. The optimist might simply look on with joy and celebrate the arrival of a Cayman that has been allowed to flourish. Whichever side you’re inclined to lean toward the result is the same: the Cayman R is a fantastic machine that sharpens and hones all of the Cayman’s edges to provide a driving experience to rival any other car in the Porsche stable. Including the 911. Of course, there exist iterations of the 911 that can easily handle a Cayman R (though the new Cayman GT4 looks to close that gap considerably), but those 911s cost significantly more money. At a starting price of around $67K the Cayman R represented a very nice value for Porsche enthusiasts and even the most die-hard 911 fan could no longer turn his nose up in disdain. I always have liked the Cayman even if it lacked those 911 quirks that made Porsche’s leading light so revered. It was a relatively light and compact car blessed with impeccable balance and enough power to quickly get you into trouble. It definitely could have been better, but that didn’t mean it wasn’t good. With the R, the model had finally begun to approach its zenith and show its true form. The example here is a Carrera White 2012 Porsche Cayman R, located in Indiana, with 18,300 miles on it. While the R was available with a 6-speed manual this one has had the PDK 7-speed automatic transmission selected. It’s not my ideal choice, but depending on your intended use that transmission can make sense. It’s faster, if arguably less fun and less engaging.…

2011 Porsche Boxster Spyder

2011 Porsche Boxster Spyder

The Porsche Boxster has been with us for nearly twenty years now and while it initially was derided as being somewhat soft Porsche gradually applied corrections and enhancements, most notably releasing the Boxster S, and at this point the Boxster makes for an excellent open-top performer. Even still the Boxster has never really been Porsche’s go to performance car. Much of that has been reserved, quite naturally, for the 911, but also for the Cayman, which debuted around half way through the Boxster’s current life. The Boxster has first and foremost been a roadster. Following along in that tradition the release of the Boxster Spyder was long overdue. The traditional roadster was meant to be a relatively simple machine. Granted, with the passage of time that formula has shifted toward higher degrees of refinement, but there remains within the ethos of any open-top two-seater that basic sense of sacrificing practicality in the name of oneness between driver, machine, and environment. In that manner, in producing the Spyder Porsche scrapped more than 100 pounds from the Boxster S through a variety of weight saving measures, most visibly through the sacrifice of the standard convertible top for what really is little more than a sun shade. Additional savings were found through aluminum doors and lighter wheels along with a host of deletions from the interior, including the use of carbon-fiber sport seats. All together we are left with one of the lightest cars in the Porsche lineup, but still with plenty of power to compliment that lighter weight. The example we see here is a Carrera White 2011 Porsche Boxster Spyder, located in Texas, with Red leather interior and 10,244 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Porsche Boxster Spyder on eBay

Motorsports Monday: 2007 Porsche Cayman S

Motorsports Monday: 2007 Porsche Cayman S

Yesterday, our editor Paul sent me a quick message with a link enclosed – “Enjoy a late birthday present!” he said. The link was to the movie Le Mans, the 1971 classic staring Steve McQueen piloting the equally iconic Gulf-liveried John Wyer run Porsche 917Ks. But while that combination would be emblazoned in history as the defacto color for the Porsche 917, to me the more memorable combination was the car that actually won the 1971 Le Mans 24 Hours. That was the magnesium-framed number 22; a pale white car that debuted an equally iconic combination for me as it was sponsored by Martini Racing. Later in the 1970s, the livery would become more famous as the multiple winners with both 935 and 936 chassis, but few remember that the connection went back into the era of the light-blue Gulf cars. The Martini livery is still popular today, carried on by a proud tradition into Formula 1 as well as being recreated by amateur enthusiasts in the Porsche Interseries, a Cayman-only race program that notably offered drivers to run famous Porsche colors. Very few can afford the opportunity to even see 917s in action – never mind own one. But a Cayman S racer? While not cheap, they’re considerably more affordable than you’d expect:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2007 Porsche Cayman S on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 2005 Porsche Boxster Ruf 3800S

Tuner Tuesday: 2005 Porsche Boxster Ruf 3800S

It seems like I’m often talking about what the best performance deal going in German cars is. That’s partially because I’m not partial to paying the “what’s new” tax on the biggest and baddest new car. Personally, I’d prefer to let someone else take the substantial depreciation hit and when it’s no longer new, swoop in for what’s still (to me) a pretty new car in good shape. The other part, though, is that I’m not flush with cash; perhaps if I had limitless resources I’d be at the Porsche or Audi dealership every other year signing on a new car. Regardless, there’s a huge contingent of our readership that I believe is in a similar situation to me – hence why we tend to look at older, more affordable (most of the time) models that represent good value, performance or collectability for a more modest investment. That brings us to the car at hand; in this post’s case, a 2005 Porsche Boxster. 2005 was early into the 987 production, having replaced the 986 in 2004. By most peoples’ measure, the 987 was a better looking car, mimicking many of the styling cues of the 997 as the 986 had mimicked the 996. Performance was also improved from some new motors, including an upgraded 3.4 liter engine in the S producing nearly 300 horsepower. That motor, however, did not appear until 2007 – meaning the top-tier S model in 2005 still had the 3.2 from the 986 sitting in the middle of the car. That motor was good for 276 horsepower, which by no means was a small amount. For some people it simply wasn’t enough though, and as expected German super-tuner Ruf offered the solution. The modified Boxsters went by the names of their engine displacement; in the 986, there was the 3400S, which was replaced by the 3600S.…

Motorsports Monday: Porsche 911 GT3 Cup v. Cayman S

Motorsports Monday: Porsche 911 GT3 Cup v. Cayman S

For German car fans who love racing, it doesn’t get much more exciting than Porsche’s long history of endurance racing. Indeed, Porsche’s venerable 911 seems intrinsically linked with racing – undoubtedly, part of its mystique. However, true factory racing Porsches have always been pretty expensive when new and still are so. Watching yesterday’s coverage of the 24 Hours of Daytona had me cringing as the multi-hundred thousand dollar Le Mans class 991 Porsches took each other out, attacked Opossums and exploded crankcases. It wasn’t a great day for Porsche at a track where the company has had an impressive string of successes. So, today I decided to take a look at two racing Porsches as an homage to their first rate engineering, their enduring appeal and incredible performance:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2014 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup on eBay

Motorsport Monday: 2011 Porsche Cayman S Interseries

Motorsport Monday: 2011 Porsche Cayman S Interseries

Last fall, Paul wrote up a Jagermeister-livery Cayman S Interseries that reminded us how great these Caymans can look, and what a great deal they are relative to some of the newer 911 race cars. The Cayman S offers most of the performance of the 911 in a more affordable package, and that was topped by the introduction of the classic Porsche racing liveries, such as Martini Racing and Jagermeister. Today’s example is a bit newer than the previous example we looked at; a 2011 model with some Martini/Salzburg inspired graphics. To me, it looks great:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Porsche Cayman S Interseries on eBay

2007 Porsche Cayman

2007 Porsche Cayman

Recently we’ve had some posts focusing on how much Porsche you could get for a small amount of money ; and while those recent posts have focused on older models, for some people that want a special car that can also function as a daily driver looking at older cars is not a reality. Luckily for those people, there are options that offer both reliability, practicality and a lower entry price into a special car. Such is the case with today’s 2007 Cayman, which looks splendid in classic Midnight Blue Metallic over tan leather:

Year: 2007
Model: Cayman
Engine: 2.7 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed automatic
Mileage: 61,000 mi
Price: $ 23,800 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2007 Porsche Cayman on eBay

2007 PORSCHE CAYMAN COUPE!!

MIDNIGHT BLUE METALLIC ON SAND BEIGE LEATHER INTERIOR!!

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION!! REAR POWER SPOILER!!

TIP-TRONIC!! HEATED SEATS!! 245 HORSEPOWER!!

FACTORY SPORT 18″ ALLOY WHEELS!! NEWER REAR TIRES!!

AMAZING PRICE ON AN AMAZING VEHICLE!!

SUPER SPORTY!! GREAT COLOR COMBO!!

PURCHASE WITH CONFIDENCE FROM “iMotors”!!

CALL SALES @ 630-904-9300 TODAY!!

The distinction that separates a true sport luxury vehicle from a basic sport vehicle is the merging of true sport performance without compromising the refinement and class of a luxury vehicle. This vehicle is the essence of luxury, style, execution and performance.

THIS CAYMAN IS IN GOOD CONDITION INSIDE AND OUT FOR ITS YEAR AND MILEAGE. IT HAS ALL THE BELLS AND WHISTLES THAT COME STANDARD WITH THIS 2007 CAYMAN COUPE. BELOW IS A LIST OF SOME OF THE OPTIONS THIS VEHICLE IS EQUIPPED WITH:

ALL BOOKS & MANUALS

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION

HEATED SEATS

AUTOMATIC CLIMATE CONTROL

MIDNIGHT BLUE ON SAND BEIGE LEATHER

POWER WINDOWS/LOCKS/MIRRORS

HEATED SEATS

FOG LIGHTS

REAR POWER SPOILER

AM/FM/CD PLAYER

CRUISE CONTROL

FACTORY 18-INCH SPORT ALLOY WHEELS

KEYLESS ENTRY

DUAL AIRBAGS

CLIMATE CONTROL

PRIVACY GLASS

2.7L H6 245 HORSEPOWER ENGINE!

Tuner Tuesday: 2007 Porsche Boxster S Ruf 3400

Tuner Tuesday: 2007 Porsche Boxster S Ruf 3400

Without a doubt, Ruf is one of the most popular tuners in the world, but enthusiasts draw a strong line in the sand over what can and should be considered a Ruf automobile. For the most part, their enthusiasm generally falls off once the car in question does not carry an official Ruf vin plate. But are there extenuating circumstances that allow some cars to still be considered from the maker? Maybe you can help decide on today’s 2007 Boxster S, a car sporting $43,000 worth of Ruf modifications and available for sale on Ebay:

Year: 2007
Model: Boxster S
Engine: 3.4 liter supercharged flat-6
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: 24,859 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2007 Porsche Boxster S Ruf 3400 on eBay

Ten years after the Boxster roadster debuted, it continues on as Porsche’s least expensive model, and remains one of the most thrilling cars on the road for the dollar.Two engines are offered, with a horizontally opposed six-cylinder 2.7L engine appearing on the base Boxster and a 3.4L version of the same engine found in the Boxster S. The smaller engine produces 245 horsepower, while the S has 295 horsepower on hand. Both powerplants use VarioCam technology for 2007 to vary both the valve timing and the valve lift on the intake camshaft. The result is increased power and improved fuel efficiency.The base Boxster has a five-speed manual transmission with a manual six-speed optional. The S gets the six-speed standard, and both models can opt for a five-speed Tiptronic transmission with gear selectors mounted behind the steering wheel.A mid-engined design gives the car a low polar moment of inertia, which enables the Boxster to navigate turns with a nimbleness that has to be experienced to be believed. The extra oomph of the S is helpful when putting the power down coming out of the corner, but the basic Boxster is also a highly entertaining and exceptionally capable vehicle.The Boxster is very well equipped, with heated power mirrors, power leather seats, power windows and locks, an alarm system, and automatic climate control.