1988 BMW 635CSi – REVISIT

The 1988 BMW 635CSi we featured at the end of last month is back on offer at the same price. For those who love an old shark and must have it equipped with a manual gearbox, read further…

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 BMW 635CSi on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site September 28, 2015:

“You wouldn’t want to drive that in traffic.”

“But they aren’t more efficient or faster than modern automatics.”

“Face it, eventually you won’t be able to buy one in a new car.”

These are some of the arguments I hear against the manual transmission these days. And each time, it falls flat on my ears, as I’m having none of it. What some non-enthusiasts don’t seem to understand is that I enjoy a bit more involvement with my vehicle than a two-pedal variant can provide. Thankfully, a few automakers are keeping the manual gearbox flame alive, including BMW. Even though there are but a few new BMWs you can buy with a manual gearbox, the option is still there. Scroll back a few decades and you could get a manual transmission in just about any BMW you wanted, including the 6 series coupe, which was at the end of its life by the time the late 1980s rolled around. This example for sale in New York is one of the rare non-M E24s equipped as such.

509

Year: 1988
Model: 635CSi
Engine: 3.5 liter inline-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 158,491 mi
Price: $9,200 Buy It Now

509

Selling my 1988 635CSi. The car is in very good condition but has been off the road and in my garage for a few years. I had a tune-up done this past week, changed the plugs and wires, cap and rotors, oil change, air filter, checked and lubricated throttle cable, etc. I kept up with maintenance and repairs as much as I could and have all receipts of work that has been done. Too much to list. Exterior is in relatively good shape considering it’s age. Interior is in good condition, front leather seats fully refurbished.

I love this car but no longer have the room or time to enjoy it. Engine runs strong and is begging to be driven.

509

Considering the mileage, this car looks to be in quite good nick. Also, the newer style alloys don’t look terribly out of place on this E24. We’ve seen 6er coupes like this with similar mileage hovering in the $6,000 to $10,000 range, so this one is about spot on considering those comps. If this car runs as good as described and has a broad enough history to know what you are getting into, it could present a more affordable way of getting into a three-pedal E24 as compared to its brawnier sibling, the M6.

-Paul

Bookmark the permalink.

4 Comments

  1. I too, refuse to let the flame of the manual transmission die. That said I’m optimistic about its future. It may fade away from vehicles made in large volume but I can practically guarantee that they will be made and serviced by professional artisans for the elite class of hobbyists who will be able to afford them in a future that is probably nearer than is comfortable to imagine.

    That said I’d like to point out that BMW continues to offer a manual transmission in the 6 series, though only in the M.

  2. Classic shark nose styling. Wheels are BBS style 5s: I have them on my M5. Colour looks like Lachssilber Metallic. Those seats look weird through. Clearly not BMW sport seats of that era.

  3. MGT – Those are standard BMW “comfort” seats that came in most of the 6 series cars. ///M cars got the “Sport” seats as standard. Factory 5-speeds in the later 635’s are indeed very rare – and a great setup in these cars!

  4. That’s my old car! I bought it in 2000 or 2001 in TN and drove it back to CT. It was a pretty decent example. There was a small rust bubble on one of the rear wheel arches. The front seats were shot although it looks like that was addressed. I put Bilsteins on it and deleted the SLS. Also added the 16″ E38 7 series wheels. Glad to see it is still on the road and if this is the current value it has appreciated about 50% since I sold it.

Comments are closed