1988 Audi 5000CS quattro

One of the reasons it’s hard to get excited about the Type 43 Audi is just how far forward the bar was moved with the Type 44. Similar to the leap from the 6-series to the 8-series BMW, the Type 44 was a radical departure both in style, aerodynamics, and chassis dynamics. The basic Type 44 chassis would endure a remarkable run, too – from its basic layout in the Forschungsauto FV Auto 2000 from the 1981 Frankfurt Auto Show right through the derivative D11 V8 quattro through the 1994 model year. The C3 was revolutionary in its incorporation of modern aerodynamic devices, helping to drop drag coefficients to a then-excellent .30 cd. The Audi design prompted many copies, the most notable of which was the very popular Ford Taurus.

But the C3 was about more than just a slick body. Underneath it continued the C2’s turbocharging on top-tier models. With the addition of intercooling, power was up quite a bit from the prior model. Where the 1983 5000 Turbo generated 130 horsepower and 142 lb.ft of torque in U.S. trim, the C3’s MC1 brought 158 horsepower and 166 lb.ft of torque to the party. It was good enough to prompt notoriously BMW-friendly Car and Driver to name it to its ’10 Best’ list for the first time. In the later 200 20V, it also brought a tamed version of Audi’s Sport Quattro motor to market. The Ingolstadt company also pioneered full body galvanization, something that would become the norm for many newer cars moving forward. That body also grew, as Audi added its signature ‘Avant’ model to the lineup. But of course the big news was the 1986 addition of the word synonymous with Audi in the 1980s and ever since – quattro:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Audi 5000CS quattro on St. Louis Craigslist

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1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa

What is it that we look for in these cars? Assuming you’re not after the perfect collector example the list is fairly straightforward though not short. The availability of documentation and a known history obviously are of great importance. A knowledgeable seller helps in this regard as well. Abundant photos, paint meter readings, an assessment of its current mechanical condition including any known flaws, and possibly originality of the equipment. Obviously, the last point will vary quite a bit from buyer to buyer, but any buyer will want to know what is original to a particular 911 and what isn’t even if that buyer does not mind the lack of originality. Lastly, we all want a fair price, but perhaps even more so when looking at driver-quality cars. Their value typically is pretty locked in so you can’t bank on higher resale down the road.

I think this Marine Blue 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa fulfills most of those points and that’s part of what I like about it. It’s up for auction without reserve so the price should be fair. It also looks pretty great. It sounds like there isn’t a huge amount of documentation, but some does exist, and it does appear we know the ownership history. There is one red flag in its history – it was a theft recovery back in the ’90s – but that red flag doesn’t seem to be causing it any problems. It is stated to have a clear title. It isn’t perfect, but looks like a very nice example of a late Carrera Targa and could find itself in a sweet spot in the market.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa on eBay

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Feature Listing: 1988 Porsche 930 Coupe

If you’ve been reading these pages long enough you’ll know that I love a bright red interior. You might also recall that for me a white exterior is a color for which I have a very love/hate relationship. I think it can work incredibly well on some cars and look incredibly boring on others. In both cases, what I like about these colors comes down to contrast. It is not the individual color itself that I enjoy, but rather the way in which it complements other colors. I can think of few better examples of this than the presentation of this Grand Prix White 1988 Porsche 930 Coupe with Lipstick Red interior and just 26,842 miles on it.

The interior is about as bright as they come on a Porsche. Contrasted with the Grand Prix White exterior it stands out in sharp focus. It’s ostentatious, but because the exterior is white I don’t find it garish. It brings some excitement to the car in a way that the much more standard black interior simply could not do and it enhances that white exterior. Overall, this is really nice looking 930 whose color combination is quite befitting of the car’s dynamic capabilities.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 930 Coupe

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1988 BMW 535i Alpina Tribute

We’ve certainly seen our fair share of fake Alpinas come across these pages, but this one makes no claim to be authentic. Instead, it’s inspired by Alpina but takes its own route and character. I originally looked at this car back in 2014 and it’s been on and off the market since. Now showing “8,800” kilometers, the side Alpina decals gone and with a $10,000 increase in asking price since the last time we saw it, will the market appreciate this custom-built E28 this time around?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 BMW 535i Alpina Tribute on eBay

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1988 BMW 325i Convertible

The beautiful M3 Convertible I looked at yesterday was a reminder that I often skimp on drop-tops entirely. On top of that, I’ve been ignoring one of the most popular options in the classic German car market – the E30.

Introduced midway through E30 production, the Convertible you see here was the first factory BMW convertible since the 1950s. It showed in the execution; BMW’s slick top folded neatly away under a hard cover, in stark contrast to Volkswagen’s Cabriolet which looked like it was sporting a neck support pillow in back. Little trunk space was lost in the execution, meaning you had a fully functional 4-seat convertible replete with storage for the weekend. Base price was nearly $29,000 in 1987, but that included leather sport seats, electric windows, anti-lock brakes, cruise control and an on-board computer. For the U.S. market, there was only one engine option, too – the M20 2.5 liter inline-6, meaning no “E” model and plenty of spin on the tach, along with 168 horsepower. This helped make up for some additional weight from the top mechanism and structural strengthening, resulting in around 3,000 lbs of curb weight. But while the E30 was the benchmark as a driver’s car, many more of these were used in a relaxed manner; top-down luxury cruisers to enjoy the sun:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 BMW 325i Convertible on San Francisco Craigslist

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1988 Porsche 944 “GTS”

This Porsche 944 sold for $7,800

I don’t often look at plain 944s, especially late examples, for a reason. By the end of the run, the standard 944 was overshadowed by the introduction of the 944S and 944S2 with their twin-cam motors and even a Cabriolet. Of course there was still the 944 Turbo and for 1988, the pumped up Turbo S. Then there was the Special Edition and the 944 2.7. Nevermind that there was also the lightweight 924S Special Edition, too. In short, there aren’t too many reasons to look at a “normal” 944 from the late production run. But with 924 Carrera GT/GTS DNA pumped into it, this particular 944 is anything but normal looking:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 944 on eBay

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1988 Porsche 928 S4

When I saw this 1988 Porsche 928 S4 my first thought upon seeing the price was that the interior better be pretty special because, while nice, the exterior seemed fairly standard. Good condition, but a standard color. Well I won’t say the interior blew me away, but given that it too is in fairly standard colors I do think it looks really good and the overall combination of everything looks really nice. There’s a simple elegance about all of it. There’s no flash, but it’s a place I’d definitely enjoy spending time behind the wheel. I guess it’s a little odd because I can’t say it is quite what I was hoping, but I found myself quite happy with it nonetheless. It helps that everything looks very well cared for. I’m not sure it’ll all be enough to get someone to pull the trigger at this price, but we’re at least looking at a nice example of the breed and one that departs somewhat from some of the more usual contrasts.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 928 S4 on eBay

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1988 Porsche 928 S4


Update 9/26/18: This 928 S4 sold for $15,211.11

In a recent post of a 928 GTS there was a comment wondering about their pricing relative to that of one of its not-too-distant predecessors the 928 S4. It’s a good question to ask if you’re looking at the 928 in general as the value of a GTS is significantly higher than any other 928 out there. Heck, the GTS has shown higher values than even a few of the turbocharged 911s from similar periods. Before considering one you do need to know what you’re getting into.

Why the GTS is so much more expensive is pretty straightforward: they’re quite rare and they are the last of the 928s. They also are arguably the best looking 928, though I’m not sure that really has a huge impact on value. For the buyer thinking about an investment and long-term value a GTS probably is the way to go, assuming you can afford that initial cost of entry. However, if you want to drive and enjoy a 928, or simply don’t have $100K to spend on a ’90s Porsche, then one of the earlier models provides nearly as much performance for far fewer dollars.

Case in point: this 1988 Porsche 928 S4, located in New Mexico, with 117,456 miles and the desirable 5-speed manual transmission. Unlike just about every 928 GTS this S4 is up for auction with no reserve and bidding sits at only $8,100. That’s a much easier pill to swallow.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 928 S4 on eBay

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1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

More questions. Always more questions. We know the basics about this 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe and by that I mean we can see what it is and we know the mileage. But the seller has provided little else in the way of description so we are otherwise left in the dark. In many cases I’d move on from such a 911, especially with such a high asking price, but there is something about this color combination I find so incredibly striking that I had to have a closer look. A Carrera with a blue exterior over a white/linen interior isn’t something incredibly rare so either the lighting is enhancing everything here or this is a paint-to-sample blue that is working beautifully with that very light-colored interior. This is where the lack of description from the seller really lets us down, but at least on the surface I do like what I see here.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

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1988 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe

This 930 might be in the best condition I can recall seeing one. The mileage is pretty darn low at only 11,300 miles so maybe this shouldn’t come as a surprise, but even still low miles does not always equate to excellent condition. I know not everyone likes the Slantnose option on these cars, but like it or not I think we can all appreciate how good this one looks. And for those us, myself included, who are fans of the Slantnose, this 930 provides you with something to spend a good deal of time inspecting.

It’s a Cassis Red Metallic 1988 Porsche 930 Coupe with the M505 Slantnose option. It’s stated to be only 1 of 2 such cars painted Cassis Red Metallic (I have no idea if that’s true) and it has a contrasting Linen and Burgundy interior. Pretty much all of the Slantnose 930s are rare and the Coupe easily is the best looking of the various models. This one is immaculate.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe on eBay

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