Feature Listing: 1987 Porsche 944S

In the late 1980s, the front-engined Porsche lineup started to get a bit convoluted – especially amongst the 4 cylinder variants. In 1986, you could choose between the the base 944 with the 150 horsepower 2.5 liter inline-4 8 valve motor that had reinvigorated the revised 924 chassis into the 944 for 1982, or if you were gunning for the big boys you could select the 217 horsepower Turbo model. To bridge the gap in performance between the two, Porsche introduced a mid-range model in 1987; the 944S. Based in part on the development of the 924 and 944 GTR Le Mans race cars from a few years earlier, the M44.40 double overhead cam 16 value motor split the difference between the two previous offerings; essentially half the 928S motor, the new “Super” produced 190 horsepower slotting itself almost perfectly in the middle of the other two offerings. Added to the S were a host of Turbo items, including springs and parts of the brake system, as well as some exotic parts such as the use of magnesium in the engine bay to keep weight down. Outside, only discrete “16 Ventiler” badges on the front fender trim differentiated that this was a special model. Coupled with the reintroduction of the 924S model, Porsche now offered four different variants of the 4-cylinder transaxle cars for enthusiasts of differing budgets. The 944S’s base price was around $5,000 more dear than the 924S, but it was considerable $8,000 less than the Turbo model’s base price. Add some options in and these 944Ss could easily crest $30,000, around what it would have cost you to walk out of the dealer with this particular example:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 944S on Cleveland Craigslist


Year: 1987
Model: 944S
Engine: 2.5 liter inline-4
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 106,000 mi
Price: $8,000

This is my 1987 Porsche 944S “Super” model with 106,000 original miles. The “S” model was the high-performance NA Porsche 944 which was only made for two years. This car had the 2.5L DOHC 16V engine making 190 HP, which was 30 horsepower more than the base 944. This car also had numerous upgrades to the suspension and brakes from the 944 Turbo model, making this a very high-performing car for the time. These cars were not made in large numbers and they are collectible.

I have just had over $2500 in service done to the car. Service work included replacing the transaxle, new timing belt, new cam chain tensioner guide, new motor mounts, new wheel bearings, new spark plugs, servicing the A/C system and new tires.

This 944S runs and drives beautifully. There are zero mechanical problems and the car is tight, quick and responsive. There are no rattles and the engine, transmission, suspension, brakes, steering and air conditioning are all working properly with no issues.

In addition to the standard options, this car has a power driver’s seat, antilock brakes, cruise control and the distinctive 16″ 928-style “manhole cover” aluminum wheels.

The engine in this car revs to 6800 rpm which was the highest of any 944 model. This car is a blast to drive, you’ll want to rev it up between every shift. The brakes and suspension are substantially upgraded over the base-model 944 as well, and you can feel it when you drive the car. This is one of the best-handling cars I’ve ever driven.

The interior is clean and in good condition. The seats, carpets and interior plastics are in good condition with no undue wear.

The exterior is clean, solid and very nice- the paint is original and in very good shape. There is no body rust.

This is a totally reliable, great-driving fun car.

Flaws? The sunroof doesn’t open and there is no radio installed.

This car is kept inside my garage near downtown Willoughby, OH.

Email me or call/text me at 440-339-4341.

The build sticker confirms the options listed; M454 – Cruise Control, M533 – Anti-Theft, M593 – ABS, M650 – Sunroof and M946 – Leather/leatherette seats. Black over black is fairly rare to see these already rare S models, and both inside and out the overall appearance is well above average. The Gullideckel forged wheels are a great look too. Maintenance on these M44.40 motors can be more expensive than the standard 8 valve motors, so the recent work performed is a big plus for the potential buyer. As with the 924SE I looked at last week, these cars are relatively undervalued in the market, and make excellent driver/collector cars when presented in good condition. They’re relatively unknown in comparison to the more popular and heavily upgraded (but more expensive) S2 model but offer improved performance, the rarity factor for collectors of a “S” model and limited production, and yet are still quite affordable as an occasional car. If you’re interested, it’s worth checking in with Pablo from Flussig Magazine, who owns a S and has extensively covered these models. Considering that the numbers this car produces are very similar to the coveted E30 M3, they really represent a much better and more attainable value for enthusiasts.

You can contact the seller directly at camera411@gmail.com or 440-339-4341.

-Carter

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5 Comments

  1. Great car great options great price. Buy it now. These won’t be $8k for much longer.

  2. Yes they are becoming rarer and rarer, a good one to put in your collection, My first Porsche was a Black 1987 944S, Had 63k miles on it when I sold it two years back. My only complaint was that it had no real torque on the low end, But when you got her up to 4k RPM’S she was a screamer!

  3. She’s a beauty. But I want to know who this guy’s mechanic is. $2,500 for all that? You’d be hard pressed to do all that yourself for $2,500. Maybe he meant “CV joints” instead of “transaxle”.

  4. Really like this. My dad bought a 944 (non-S) new in, I think, ’84. I loved that car. This car seems awfully affordable. I’m more of a 911/914-6 guy so curious, is 106k miles of concern? If properly maintained how many miles could one expect from one of these? I have a hunch that these could become collectible but I know that mileage can all but kill collectibility for certain makes/models. Thanks

  5. Hey Reid, thanks for the comments. The 16V motor can be more expensive to run/maintain than the 8Vs because in 2.5 guise it wasn’t around very long, but it’s still pretty affordable in comparison on some of the air cooled motors. It’s difficult to say how much collector status they’ll achieve, since there are many of the 24/44/68 variants that are desirable and have followings.

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