1996 Porsche 911 Carrera

I’m not exactly breaking any news here, but we are 25-years deep and then some on the 993 Porsche 911 chassis and it is aging extremely well. All the way from the base Carrera 2 up to the Turbo S and GT models, the models are desired and are probably going to stay that way. Naturally any starting point when dipping your toe in the 993 world is the Carrera 2 as it offers all the purity of the rear-wheel drive air-cooled 911 without spending over $100,000. This example up for sale in North Carolina is exactly that.

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2004 Porsche 911 Turbo X50

Well, we knew this day would come sooner or later. The 996 Porsche 911 Turbo is now selling for over $100,000. A few weeks ago we saw a 2005 sell for $104,000, which surely shocked a few people who follow the 996 Turbo market. Yes, that car probably sold for more than what is it worth, but it was a very rare Turbo S coupe with low miles, a handful of modifications, and good service history. A Rising tides lifts all boats? Not so fast. There are always market outliers, and usually for good reason. This 2004 911 Turbo with the X50 Performance Package up for sale in Miami sure seems like it wants to be one of the outliers as well.

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2000 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe

Back in January, I took a look at a GT Package 996 with very low mileage in great condition and with the IMS bearing done; in short, there was little to complain about, except for the asking price at $43,000:

2001 Porsche 911 Carrera GT Package

Well, I’m back with another 996.1; this time, is a C4 with the factory Aerokit bits in Speed Yellow. Mileage is even lower this time around, yes the IMS bearing is done, and it’s got some great BBS wheels. What does that do for the asking price? Hold on to your wallet…

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1981 Porsche 911SC Targa

After the aircooled Porsche price spike about seven or eight years ago, prices have been pretty stable. This has been true for the G Body market given the crazy number of them out there in every single variant you could want. From the early 2.7-liter cars all the way up to the 3.2-liters with the G50 gearbox, you can pretty much guess they’ll all be in the ballpark of the same price. What really made one car worth more was the condition, mileage, and of course the color combo. If you brought somewhere between $35,000 to $50,000 to the table, you could walk around with a car that way probably close to what you wanted. Then 2020 happened.

What I’ve seen over the past eight months are so is strong rise for the best G Body example and it seems to be raising all boats. The very best cars are into six-figures now, and even somewhere average cars have bumped up in price. I think this has to do with forces outside the Porsche world in general, but I’m sure a lot of people are trying to get in while you still can. Or rather if you can. Today’s car, European-market 1981 911SC Targa, is still priced somewhat competitively given what is going on. Plus, I love Moss Green Metallic. Speak now or forever hold your peace.

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1988 Porsche 944 ‘Celebration’ Special Edition

I write up 924s a lot, and the obvious question comes to mind – why not just get a 944, with neater flared fenders and a much nicer interior? It’s a very valid question. Indeed, why would you choose a 924 – even a very nice, limited production one – over a 944? The answer is simple. Price.

When the 924S Special Edition was last on the market in 1988, you could stroll down to your dealer and pick one up for around $23,000. If you wanted to step up to the 944 – which offered no practical improvement in performance, mind you, as it was actually slower than the 924S – you’d have to shell out an additional $10,000. In many ways, that gulf of value perception remains today; it’s possible to find deals on 944s, but very nice 944s don’t come cheap, at least not in asking price.

I’ve spent considerable time talking about the 924S Special Edition and what a cool package it offered you on the cheap, the 944 equivalent isn’t covered much. Often referred to as the ‘Celebration Edition’, just like the 911 and 924S the 944 received a Special Edition package in 1988. Built to commemorate the 250,000th 911 produced but coinciding with 100,000 944s made, too, Porsche officially referred to the 944’s trim as the “Special Edition Package”. What did you get?

For $2,437, Porsche equipped your car with option code M757. This gave the car “a unique leatherette/gray-plaid cloth interior, silver velour carpeting, and a commemorative plaque which may be personalized with the owner’s name” according to Porsche. You also had to select metallic paint, a $645 charge, in one of two colors; Satin Black Metallic or Zermatt Silver Metallic. Otherwise these cars were pretty well loaded; the antithesis of the lightweight, stripped-down 924S SE. They came with split-folding rear seats, electric sunroof, rear window wiper, and 15″ ‘Phone Dial’ wheels, along with standard fog lights, central locking, electric mirrors, power windows, power steering, and automatic climate control. Like pretty much every special edition Porsche, these cars were seemingly earmarked for collectors:

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2016 Porsche 911 R

As much as the Porsche 911 GT3 Touring was theoretically produced in an attempt to curb the insane mark-up prices on the 911 R, it seems like they didn’t produce enough. Based on the recent prices, a lot more people want GT3 Tourings than are out there. As for the 911 R? Good luck even finding one. If they do turn up, bring a barrel of money. Several barrels of money. This example up for sale in Houston with 158 miles? Do I need to even so more?

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2007 Porsche 911 Carrera S Cabriolet

Just to wash the bad taste out of our mouth from the paint-to-sample 993 Turbo earlier this week, I thought I’d look at a shade that is a lot more pleasant. This is a 2007 Porsche 911 Carrera S Cabriolet finished in paint-to-sample … something purple. The seller says it is “Lavender,” however I don’t recall that being an option for the paint-to-sample cars. This looks much more like Vesuvio Metallic or a shade very close to that. It doesn’t scream purple like an Ultraviolet, but rather has a little bit of a grey tint in it. Personally, I like it. But maybe not on this exact example.

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1997 Porsche 911 Turbo

Paint-to-sample examples are usually my favorite cars to look at. They almost always have some kind of unique twist that sets them apart from the standard color range and I’m mostly all for them. Mostly. Today is not one of those cars.

This is a 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo finished in paint-to-sample Gold Metallic. That might be the most literal description of a color ever. There is no denying this is a gold car and boy, is it not shy. Sometimes you can get away with having a gold car, but I think this is probably one of my least favorite shades ever, especially on a 993 Turbo. However, it doesn’t end there. Just wait until you see what the picked for the interior.

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2007 Porsche 911 Carrera S

Sometimes what you see isn’t always what the reality might be. That of course applies to colors of cars as well. When I look at the photo above and process what color that is, I would say navy blue. It has a little lighter hue, but a nice dark blue is where I would put my money. However, Porsche will tell you that you are not worthy of judging a color as they are calling the shade “Atlas Grey Metallic”. Naturally I went over to Google and did an image search for Atlas Grey Metallic and what pops up is a bunch of cars that still look navy blue to me. Am I out of touch here?

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2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder

For the past 20 years or so, Porsche hasn’t been shy about the special editions. Most of the time they pick the non-911s as it is easier to be a little be creative with the models. This special edition, the 2008 Boxster RS60 Spyder, was made to commemorate their victory at the 12 Hours of Sebring in 1960. The car used there was the Porsche 718 RS Spyder, which is suppose is an ancestor of the current Boxster, or at least Porsche wants you to imagine that. Just 1,960 units were made in a unique GT Silver Metallic exterior over a Carrera Red interior that was intended to match the look of the 718 RS Spyder itself. There was some other special trim as well as a sport exhaust, which raised output to 303 horsepower. Values have been surprisingly strong believe or not, and they don’t seem to be getting any cheaper. Worth it?

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