10K Friday 20V Turbo Edition: S6 v. 200 20V v. S2 v. S2 Avant v. S4 v. 200 20V Avant

Most of my 10K posts have been a balance between finding examples of cars that just squeak under the 10K limit (sometimes, a little liberally) but aren’t complete wrecks. Typically, they’re examples of cars that you just don’t often think of as being cheap or don’t typically see fitting into a budget. But, it’s always a bit of a compromise – seldom are they exactly the cars that I’d buy. More often than not, when it comes to these comparisons I’d spend a little bit extra to get a better example of the car I wrote up than the budget one. Any number of enthusiasts will tell you why; a higher priced but better maintained car is almost always a more sound investment than a lower priced, questionable history example. There are, however, some cars that fall in general well below our self-imposed 10K cap. Most notably, when comparing packages and what one gets for a moderate investment, it’s hard to argue with the early 1990s Audis. Though Audis reputation was, in many ways, in the toilet at this point of history, arguably this is when they reached their zenith of design, performance and build quality. Certainly, newer Audis are more quiet, faster and have gorgeous interiors – however, they also have a reputation for being overly complicated, expensive to fix and often on the IR list with dashboards lit up as if we were a few months closer to Christmas.

But in the mid to late 1980s, Audi spent millions of dollars developing their turbo technology and the inline-5 motor into a world-beating engine. They raced several different race series with this flexible platform, dominating with their quattro technology. Simultaneously, Audi developed two new chassis to hold the 20V power plant – the B3/4 90 chassis and the C4 100 both would receive versions of the 20V Turbo, along with the last run of Quattros in the form of the RR. Both of these chassis were painstakingly designed to not only take on the competition from Munich and Stuttgart, but indeed to best them. This was a time when Audi was alone at offering all-wheel drive turbocharged performance sedans, coupes and wagons in the luxury market – something we’ve since come to associate with most major manufacturers. Despite the innovation, good looks, notorious long-lived reliability and performance potential of these cars, though, most of them remain the most affordable of their contemporaries. I’ve lined up a group of most of the 20V applications here – which would be your choice? Let’s start with the S6:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Audi S6 on audifans

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1983 Audi Quattro 20V Turbo swap

Maybe you looked at Monday’s 1985 Quattro and thought “That’s for me, but I’m short on money and want more power.” We here at GCFSB.com feel your pain! So today’s answer is a 1983 Audi Quattro that has a 3B 20V turbo motor swap. This swap is very popular with the Ur crowd, as it both solves the problem of the early underpowered/lag prone U.S. models while offering even an even more tunable engine. If you’re a fan of boxflares, big turbos and Rally action, this might just be the car for you! Take a look at today’s 1983 Mars Red example:

Year: 1983
Model: Quattro
Engine: 2.2 liter turbocharged inline-5
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 166,000 mi
Price: $10,000

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1983 Audi Quattro 20V Turbo swap on Quattroworld.com

Mars Red with 166K miles

I bought the UrQ last year and had it delivered from California. Aesthetically, the body is a 7 out of 10. However, due to the nature of the west coast cars, this car has next to zero rust. It was my intent to get a solid chassis thus I searched for cars in the west coast.

The urquattro was converted to a 3B by the previous owner. As I was told, the conversion was performed by an Audi/VW Tech. The engine runs very well and boost comes on very strong. The brakes were upgraded to G60s with stainless steel lines. The bomb was replaced with a vacuum setup. It was also lowered with H&R springs.

I also have bought an 87 Coupe as a spare parts car. I would like to have the 87 Coupe taken along with the UrQ.

I have not really done much to the car since I had it other than give it some new shocks for the rear trunk and purchase a new sunroof seal. I did take the lower center console out in hopes of someday upgrading that to a newer dash but that was pointless given I would have to take all of the dash apart which I never had time to do. It comes with the stock 83 ur wheels. I did have a full set of UrS wheels refinished and may consider selling them with the car if the offer is close to my asking price.

I am looking to get $10000. I think it can be an excellent car in the hands of the right owner. I looked at a couple examples of east coast cars and they had too many rust issues and hence the search for a west coast car.

I had great hopes of making the urquattro my one piece of Audi history memorabilia but I have quite too many cars and will need to have it sold to make room for some garage space.

If you have any questions, you can contact me at: guards4s at gmail dot com

Located in Northern NJ.

The seller appears to be honest and upfront, though the advertisement really fails to mention what is probably in need in this car; the interior. Despite this the car does come with a full late model GT parts car; great for some shared electrical items and some body panels, but mostly for the windshield and interior. The seller mentions the car is light on rust, but doesn’t go so far as to say the car is rust free. I appreciate the honesty, as few of these cars are rust free, so presuming the shock towers and rockers are okay, most everything else is fixable.

Details on the 20V swap are also lacking, but it’s a reasonably straightforward swap and it’s running, so the two main hurdles are jumped there. The car features upgraded brakes which is nice, and flat lens Euro lights – also a bonus as long as they’re properly relayed. Otherwise, the only thing I’d try to negotiate into the sale would be to hold onto those great S4 Fuchs wheels – 16×8 and quite light, they’re desirable to have although not correct for the car. Like the 85, this car could use some Euro bumpers but looks like an honest way to get into a quick Quattro. Value is quite reasonable on this model even considering the work to get it perfect, and unlike the “please keep it mostly original” 1985, this is a prime candidate to make into your Rally car dream.

-Carter