Press "Enter" to skip to content

Tag: 2011

2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0

In terms of the king of the hill in the Porsche 911 GT world, there are two. One is the 2011 GT2 RS, and the other is today’s car, the 2011 GT3 RS 4.0. Both of them were extremely limited in production, and most importantly, had a manual gearbox. Because of that, they sell for crazy money. Really crazy money. They have the perfect formula to be a really great collector car, and if you have a half a million bucks to spend, it all comes down to whether you want turbochargers or no. I don’t think either can be called better than the other, but for me, I might lean towards this GT3 RS 4.0.

Outside of a handful of paint-to-sample examples, the 600 cars were either offered in black or Carrara White. Today, we have one in British Racing Green. Naturally, I freaked out and thought this might be the best 4.0 ever spec’d out, but was disappointed to see it is wearing a vinyl wrap and not paint. Still, if you have $400,000, I would suggest this purchase.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0 at JZM Porsche

2 Comments

2011 Porsche 911 Turbo S

In terms of contrast between the 997.1 Porsche 911 Turbo and the 997.2 Porsche 911 Turbo, it is very clear – at least when it comes to comparing the cars with the gearboxes that only have two pedals. A few days ago we looked at the 997.1, it has a regular five-speed automatic transaxle with a traditional torque converter. It is slow, it is soft, and it sucks a lot of power. However the clouds cleared once the 997.2 came around and the Tiptronic box was replaced by the snappy seven-speed PDK gearbox. All of a sudden it isn’t a penalty to only have two pedals in the footwell; the 6-speed cars physically can’t shift faster than the PDK car. Yes, I know it isn’t all about 0-60 times and being the fastest, but PDK was a game changer for the 911 Turbo. Even better when talking about a 997.2 Turbo S, which is what we have up for sale today.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

2 Comments

2011 Porsche 911 Targa 4

I’ve mentioned this before – but unless you have a keen eye, the 993, 996, and 997 Targa models don’t exactly scream “Hey, I’m a Targa!”. They all used very complex glass roofs with a hatchback-style piece that can be helpful in some situations. Still, these models have a far contrast to the return of the Targa panel that we saw with the 991. For the 997 chassis, all the Targa cars were built on the Carrera 4 body, which of course meant all were all-wheel drive. Just 1,760 were produced worldwide, with only 800 coming to America. This 2011 Targa 4 up for sale outside of Philadelphia is finished in the wonderful color of Racing Green Metallic over a Sand Beige interior; however, it is not cheap.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Porsche 911 Targa 4

2 Comments

2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0

When it comes to the argument of which Porsche 911 is the king of the hill, you won’t see me dismiss the 997 GT3 RS 4.0. Porsche and the GT team basically did everything they could to crank 500 horsepower out of a flat-six squeezed in the back of the 997. At the time, this was supposed to be the last GT car with a true six-speed manual. So when these dropped, all 600 were jumped on like wild dogs on meat. Now ten years later, double the MSRP and you can take one home. Fair deal?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0 on eBay

4 Comments

2011 BMW Z4 sDrive35i

BMW’s naming convention went all wonky (even wonkier, perhaps?) after 2010, as they moved away from the previous ‘iX’ moniker to the new ‘xDrive’ nameplate. To make normal models seem equally special, or perhaps to keep German badge makers employed, they then introduced a new model option – ‘sDrive’. While you might at first think this stands for ‘sport’, you’d be wrong. In fact, the ‘sDrive’ is like Audi’s ‘FrontTrak’ – a fancy name for a two-wheel drive model. Does that automatically mean rear-drive? No. You can, for example, get a brand new 2020 BMW X1 sDrive, which means front-wheel drive, but ostensibly the name is associated with the rear-drive-only Z4 roadster, as we see here.

The revised E89 Z4 launched in 2009, and gone were two things – the M variant, and the coupe, which was replaced by a folding hardtop design. Europe got a plethora of engine choices, but in America we got two, essentially shared with the E8x series – the sDrive3.0i and the sDrive3.5i. As with the E8x and E9x series, the “3.5” wasn’t actually a 3.5, but the twin-turbocharged N54 under the hood. Unlike both of those other models, though, the N54 was not replaced with the N55 single-turbo motor after 2010. Instead, the N54 soldiered on. Also unlike the E8x and e9x models, while there was a ‘is’ model launched that turned up the twist to 1M levels of power, in the Z4 that engine choice could only be had with a seven-speed DCT gearbox. That means that this car was the most potent form of the E89 you could get at the time with a manual transmission:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 BMW Z4 sDrive35i on eBay

2 Comments