2011 Porsche 911 Turbo S

In terms of contrast between the 997.1 Porsche 911 Turbo and the 997.2 Porsche 911 Turbo, it is very clear – at least when it comes to comparing the cars with the gearboxes that only have two pedals. A few days ago we looked at the 997.1, it has a regular five-speed automatic transaxle with a traditional torque converter. It is slow, it is soft, and it sucks a lot of power. However the clouds cleared once the 997.2 came around and the Tiptronic box was replaced by the snappy seven-speed PDK gearbox. All of a sudden it isn’t a penalty to only have two pedals in the footwell; the 6-speed cars physically can’t shift faster than the PDK car. Yes, I know it isn’t all about 0-60 times and being the fastest, but PDK was a game changer for the 911 Turbo. Even better when talking about a 997.2 Turbo S, which is what we have up for sale today.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

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2011 Porsche 911 Targa 4

I’ve mentioned this before – but unless you have a keen eye, the 993, 996, and 997 Targa models don’t exactly scream “Hey, I’m a Targa!”. They all used very complex glass roofs with a hatchback-style piece that can be helpful in some situations. Still, these models have a far contrast to the return of the Targa panel that we saw with the 991. For the 997 chassis, all the Targa cars were built on the Carrera 4 body, which of course meant all were all-wheel drive. Just 1,760 were produced worldwide, with only 800 coming to America. This 2011 Targa 4 up for sale outside of Philadelphia is finished in the wonderful color of Racing Green Metallic over a Sand Beige interior; however, it is not cheap.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Porsche 911 Targa 4

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2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0

When it comes to the argument of which Porsche 911 is the king of the hill, you won’t see me dismiss the 997 GT3 RS 4.0. Porsche and the GT team basically did everything they could to crank 500 horsepower out of a flat-six squeezed in the back of the 997. At the time, this was supposed to be the last GT car with a true six-speed manual. So when these dropped, all 600 were jumped on like wild dogs on meat. Now ten years later, double the MSRP and you can take one home. Fair deal?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0 on eBay

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2011 BMW Z4 sDrive35i

BMW’s naming convention went all wonky (even wonkier, perhaps?) after 2010, as they moved away from the previous ‘iX’ moniker to the new ‘xDrive’ nameplate. To make normal models seem equally special, or perhaps to keep German badge makers employed, they then introduced a new model option – ‘sDrive’. While you might at first think this stands for ‘sport’, you’d be wrong. In fact, the ‘sDrive’ is like Audi’s ‘FrontTrak’ – a fancy name for a two-wheel drive model. Does that automatically mean rear-drive? No. You can, for example, get a brand new 2020 BMW X1 sDrive, which means front-wheel drive, but ostensibly the name is associated with the rear-drive-only Z4 roadster, as we see here.

The revised E89 Z4 launched in 2009, and gone were two things – the M variant, and the coupe, which was replaced by a folding hardtop design. Europe got a plethora of engine choices, but in America we got two, essentially shared with the E8x series – the sDrive3.0i and the sDrive3.5i. As with the E8x and E9x series, the “3.5” wasn’t actually a 3.5, but the twin-turbocharged N54 under the hood. Unlike both of those other models, though, the N54 was not replaced with the N55 single-turbo motor after 2010. Instead, the N54 soldiered on. Also unlike the E8x and e9x models, while there was a ‘is’ model launched that turned up the twist to 1M levels of power, in the Z4 that engine choice could only be had with a seven-speed DCT gearbox. That means that this car was the most potent form of the E89 you could get at the time with a manual transmission:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 BMW Z4 sDrive35i on eBay

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2011 Mercedes-Benz E350

Color is a big piece of the pie when it comes to buying a car. Sometimes it is the only piece. Today is one of those one-piece pies. This 2011 Mercedes-Benz E350 up for sale in Arizona is finished in Pearl Beige Metallic, and what a color it is. To me, pearl + beige + metallic = gold. This is the first time I’ve seen a modern Mercedes-Benz in Pearl Beige Metallic and by the looks of it, I’m probably not the only one.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Mercedes-Benz E350 on eBay

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2011 BMW 335d Sport

Since the 1990s, the proliferation of each premium marque’s “special” brands has become dizzying, and for enthusiasts it seems as though they’ve continuously diluted the performance options in favor of profits. From S-Line to AMG to perhaps the biggest offender, BMW’s M division, companies are badge slapping-happy when it comes to sticking a bigger set of wheels, some special trim and maybe, if you’re lucky, a few extra ponies. And on the surface, this 335d would seem to fit that description perfectly. After all, how could you possibly compare the diesel to that sonorous M3’s S65 V8 that cranks out over 400 horsepower and 300 lb.ft of torque with a 8,400 RPM redline? Pull up to a redlight next to one in this 335d, and the snickering owner would undoubtedly be laughing at the ‘M-Sport’ option package you ticked off. Because you’d think there would be absolutely no way that diesel would produce equal power to the M3.

You’d be right. The M57 under the hood of the 335d doesn’t produce as much horsepower as the M3, at least not in stock form. But torque? It produces more. A lot more.

Starting at a leisurely 2,000 rpms, the twin turbochargers augmenting the inline-6 spool up to a mountain of power. In stock form, the 335d cranked out 428 lb.ft of torque. In fact, it’s so much torque that gets used on a regular basis that the first person I met who had one had already consumed a transfer case on his xDrive model, and he’s not alone. Being a turbocharged model, it was also quite easy and possible to turn up the wick, and yet this classy 4-door can still return 35 mpg. Try that in a M3:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 BMW 335d M Sport on eBay

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2011 Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG

If you told me I had to go spend every last penny of my money that wasn’t used to sleep or eat, I’d probably go buy a Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG. Why? It has everything. Power, looks, exclusivity, and most importantly, Gullwing doors. In all seriousness, this car is a monster. My editor Carter instructed in one at a supercar event and the car looks like it was ready to eat every single cone for lunch then move onto eating the light poles next. This isn’t a re-bodied SL63 with some fancy doors. This is a exotic super car. It was first Mercedes-Benz automobile designed and built from scratch entirely by AMG. It had the the world’s most powerful naturally aspirated production series engine at the time. They had to nail this car and they did. In all honestly, I probably couldn’t handle this car at anything more than 50% of what it is capable of. It’s too much. One of my daily drivers is a 240D for heaven’s sake. All this still isn’t stopping me from saving every penny though.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG at Hemmings

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2011 BMW 1M with 10,600 miles

The BMW 1M is safely now into cult status. Values for used examples very rarely dip below $40,000 with the nicest one selling for tens of thousands more. Does it surprise me? Yes, a little. I think we all knew it was a really fun car, but I don’t think anyone knew they’d still be trading hands close to MSRP some eight years later. Good value for money? I can’t argue it. These cars are a hoot in daily driver situations as well as the track. Yeah, the N54 has its drawbacks (this example needed new spark plugs at 8,000 miles), but if you stay on top of things, nothing is too severe. Today, I came across an example painted in signature Valencia Orange with just over 10,000 miles. Even better, it was for sale at a BMW dealer in San Francisco. Great news, right? Nope. You aren’t prepared for how much they are asking for this car. Trust me.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 BMW 1M Coupe at BMW San Francisco

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2011 BMW 550i 6-speed

I’ve recently noticed a large amount of second-hand F10s hitting the market, and what’s been surprising to me is just how cheap they’ve gotten so quickly. Perhaps I just haven’t been paying attention, but suddenly the asking prices on the early F10s are precariously close to $10,000. I suppose it makes sense; the F10 is out of production and no longer the “new thing”, with early examples over 100,000 miles and 8 years old. That’s pretty much a death sentence for a mid-sized executive sedan.

But before you entirely dismiss the F10 line and commence your search for lightly used G30s, there are a few reasons to consider some specific trims in the lineup. For one, the F10 was a lot less controversial of a design than the E60 had been. Second, they seemed to integrate the technology better into the platform, making it a lot less glitch-prone than its predecessor. And, as with all 5-series iterations, power was once again up in the newer models across the board.

But within the F10 lineup for the U.S., there was one particular model which was quite special – what’s listed here as a 550i M-Sport 6-speed. Some 611 550is were equipped with manuals, but of those only 269 were made with the M-Sport package. Today’s example is one of just 16 550i manuals produced in Cashmere Silver Metallic:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 BMW 550i 6-speed on eBay

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Feature Listing: 2011 Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG

The Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG had the nearly impossible task of being the spiritual successor of the legendary 300SL Gullwing. I say ‘nearly impossible’ because if one car could measure up to the 300SL nearly 50 years later, the SLS AMG somehow managed. Jeremy Clarkson raved about SLS AMG calling it “the greatest car in the world” at the time and that ”this is the thinking man’s supercar”. I agree completely. The team at AMG managed to make a beautifully contoured car with Gullwing doors and somehow engineered it to get to 60 mph in the mid-three second range and top out at 200 mph. All of this is possible in a car so comfortable and easy to live with that you could use it as a daily driver. It was the ultimate grand tourer with doors to die for. Granted, if you were the kind of person to buy a SLS you almost certainly had other vehicles in your fleet and that seems to be the case with today’s car. This 2011 painted in the sleek Obsidain Black checks in with just 4,500 miles and looks every bit the part. The even better news, once you swing open those doors, the car only looks better.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG at Treasured Transportation

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