1969 Porsche 912

We see a lot of cars whose sellers refer to them as time capsules. In most cases that refers to a reasonably well kept car that’s mostly original, but it’s certainly not something that would get us all hot and bothered about vintage aesthetics. In some cases those cars can be downright haggard; time capsules in the sense of simply being, well, old. There are rare cases, however, where the term seems to apply; a car that not only appears to be entirely original, but even looks in the sort of condition one would expect had they owned the car during the time in which it was for sale. This car might just fit that bill. Here is a Polo Red 1969 Porsche 912 Coupe, located in Tennessee, with just 20,945 miles on it. As with most “time capsule” automobiles we have arrived at this point through long-term storage, but unlike some barn finds that really do look like they’ve been sitting in a barn, this 912 presents extremely well. Much of that probably comes down to the work of those who brought it back to life after it came out of storage. Regardless, it’s said to have its original paint, original interior, along with all of its original parts.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Porsche 912 on eBay

Continue reading

1969 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa

Let’s check back in on my favorite quirky Porsche: the Soft-window Targa. As I’ve mentioned before, the Soft-window Targa was Porsche’s engineering solution to a problem they anticipated would occur, but never actually did. It’s sort of a window into the development process that even made it into production, if only for a short time. Because Porsche suspected that increasingly stringent safety regulations would render the cabriolet obsolete they sought to get out in front of these regulations and produce a model that would provide both the full open-cockpit feel of a convertible and also the safety of a fixed roll hoop. The Soft-window Targa was both an ingenious and somewhat ridiculous solution to that problem. I say ridiculous because to me these have never really looked right; they’ve always look like someone’s garage project, even if a well executed one. The idea did work, but Porsche quickly introduced the fixed hard-window version with which we are all familiar and the soft-window drifted off into the sunset. We do still see them from time to time and they are generally pretty popular with collectors due to their rarity and, I think, in part because of their interesting engineering. They certainly make for a fine talking piece. For whatever reason we’ve seen quite a few more examples of the 912 of late rather than the 911 and today is no different. Here we have a very pretty Irish Green 1969 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa, located in California, with what appears to be 109,000 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa on eBay

Continue reading

1966 Porsche 912

I think if I searched my posts for my favorite color combination I’d find a lot of candidates for best and quite a few I’ve labeled as my favorite. Here we have another: a Slate Grey 1966 Porsche 912 with Red interior. It’s simply a wonderful combination of colors with both the exterior and interior each possessing their own distinct qualities, which combine to great effect. These seem the ideal complement to one another and I think those who really enjoy a bright red interior (as I do) will agree that the combination works incredibly well. The mileage is slightly uncertain, but given that the odometer appears to have rolled over I’m assuming it is above 100K miles and I have listed it as such here. Those fantastic colors surround what appears to be a lovingly cared for and restored driver-quality 912 that should provide for an excellent, cheaper, alternative to an early 911 blessed with nearly identical body lines, but with a flat-four rather than the 911’s flat-six.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1966 Porsche 912 on eBay

Continue reading

1969 Porsche 912 Targa

For all intents and purposes, 1969 marked the end of the 912 as Porsche’s entry-level automobile. With the introduction of the 911T, the 912 didn’t really make much sense anymore and Porsche was soon to debut the 914 as a new model that was not only entry-level in itself, but also quite different. Sure, the 912 would be back as a one year filler in 1976, complete with impact bumpers, but really it was with those earlier examples that it would make its name. It even served as a German police car. Part of the 912’s appeal was that it appeared so similar to its bigger brother the 911. In fact, the differences between the two came down almost entirely to the 912’s use of a four-cylinder engine rather than the 911’s flat-six. From the outside a quick glance would reveal little difference between the two and the 912 was even reputed to showcase better handling given its better weight distribution. Over the years many have disappeared through use but now and again we come across very nice examples, like this Polo Red 1969 Porsche 912 Targa located in California.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Porsche 912 Targa on eBay

Continue reading

1966 Porsche 912

For quite some time now the Porsche 912 has served as the go-to option of the budget-minded Porsche enthusiast – or at least for those who remain attached to the hallmark of rear-engine and rear-drive coupes. Of course, given that the 912 was Porsche’s entry-level model it was natural that it should continue to serve such a function even after its production had ceased. With an appearance nearly identical to that of the 911, the 912 offered the same aesthetics but with sacrifices to performance. With time as the long-hood 911 became more desirable and more highly valued and as modern machinery dwarfed the performance possibilities of even a vintage 911, the performance differences between the 911 and 912 probably didn’t seem hugely significant, especially for those who might have been looking at a 911T. That made the 912 a great option for vintage motoring on a budget. We are beginning to move away from those days. With the air-cooled 911 line becoming increasingly valuable the 912 too has seen its values rise and it has become difficult to find quality examples for budget prices. I guess eventually most good things do end. A 912 still comes in at a pretty good discount over many long-hood 911s, just not as much as they used to be. The example we see here is a short-wheel-base model that looks in very good condition and sits with a very desirable Slate Grey exterior.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1966 Porsche 912 on eBay

Continue reading

1968 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa

Porsche’s soft-window Targa is one of those engineering feats that is a mix of the sublime and the ridiculous. It is a brilliant solution to a problem that never really arose, but with its removable rear window and fixed roll hoop it looks…strange. I think Porsche’s engineers realized this as the design only existed for three model years, and during production of the Soft-window Targa a fixed hard window was an available option. Even so, with safety standards failing to render the convertible obsolete it would still take 15 years before Porsche actually produced a Cabriolet version of the 911 so in that regard the Soft-window Targa seems well ahead of its time. There is definitely a lot going on with these. Design aesthetics aside, its short production run for either the 911 or 912 makes the Soft-window Targa a rare and interesting commodity among vintage Porsches and one that surely attracts plenty of questions and gazes within any collection. They are a part of Porsche history and as such always warrant considerable attention. The example we have here is a Light Ivory 1968 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa located in Ohio.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa on eBay

Continue reading

1968 Porsche 912

Red Porsches have become fairly ubiquitous on the second-hand market due primarily to their popularity in the ’80s and, to a lesser extent, the ’90s, but that popularity has not always been the case. And judging by their lack of prevalence among newer models, we may see their presence gradually wane over time. Among the earliest models they remain somewhat rare, yet they can be incredibly striking. Such is the case with the car here, a Polo Red 1968 Porsche 912, located in Indiana, with a reported 88,800 miles on it. I remain a huge fan of the 912 in general. These were the simpler, 4-cylinder, entry-level counterparts to the 911 that eventually were phased out when Porsche introduced the 911T as its lowest-cost offering. For a long time now the 912 has made for an excellent alternative to the 911 for those seeking a vintage driver for lower cost, but who still desired that 911 shape. That said, as prices for good models increase they do become a more difficult proposition. We’re still at a point where the best examples of the 912 only begin to reach the prices of a decent 911T, so we are not yet dealing with equal levels of condition, but given more time we may see an increased convergence of the market for these two entry-level Porsches.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 Porsche 912 on eBay

Continue reading

1968 Porsche 912

It is becoming increasingly difficult to find a Porsche 912 that falls into that middle stage of the market: not a pristine collector car, but not a car in need of significant work either. That’s somewhat troubling since much of the appeal of the 912 precisely is the opportunity for getting your hands on a good vintage Porsche driver, but without breaking the bank. Entry-level Porsche at entry-level pricing. But as the market for the 912 has heated up there is more incentive to restore properly those that have been neglected, which also brings out the sellers who are less interested in putting in the time for a quality restoration. Of course, this also tends to mean that owners of the middle-of-the-road cars price them too high – a rising tide raising all boats and whatnot – but ultimately a patient buyer should eventually be able to find one for a reasonable price. The example we see here, a Tangerine 1968 Porsche 912, located in Maryland, I think falls into that latter category. It looks in good running condition and worthy of being a fun weekend cruiser, but the asking price will likely need to come down. That said, excellent examples of the 912 have slipped into $50k-$60K territory so even this asking price is well under where top examples will sell.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 Porsche 912 on eBay

Continue reading

1967 Porsche 912

The 912 had a fairly short run as Porsche’s entry-level coupe. Though it had a lot of early success and seemed well liked, its appeal seems to have waned rather quickly and after a short 5 year production run it was replaced by the 914 as Porsche’s cheapest offering. It did reappear for one year as Porsche transitioned from the 914 to the 924, but it is that first run that was most interesting. Perhaps the 912 simply was too similar to the 911, a trait that now stands as one of its best features, and as Porsche released the 911T the writing on the wall was clear, the 912 would be replaced. Nearly identical in appearance to the 911, the 912 used a 1.6 liter flat-four derived from what had been standard in the 356. This smaller and lighter engine had the effect of creating a more balanced chassis relative to the 911 and early 912s were reputed to handle better than their more expensive sibling. On the short-wheelbase models produced from 1965-1968 those dynamic differences were at their most pronounced. In 1969 Porsche decided that with the release of the 914 and 911T that production of the 912 would no longer be viable and the model was discontinued. Here we have what looks like a very nice example of one of the short-wheelbase models: a Bahama Yellow 1967 Porsche 912 Coupe, located in Oregon, with 58,516 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1967 Porsche 912 on eBay

Continue reading