2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

For some reason I’ve been really itching for a Porsche 911 of late. I’ve done all the scenarios in my head from a G-body all the way up to an early 997.1. Naturally the most cost effective way to get into a 911 is a 996.1, but given their less-than-beautiful looks and dreaded IMS issues that the internet compares to a same amount of severity as a tsunami, it might not be the most enjoyable car to buy. However, bump the budget up another $10,000 and you can slide right into 996 Turbo looks without 996 Turbo cost or of course, power. The C4S in my opinion is a great looking car given what you want to work with on the 996 body, and I love they went with a heckblende across the rear like generations past. Today’s car, a 2004 C4S up for sale in Washington state, is painted in the always nice Guards Red and even has a handful of nice little options on the inside.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S on eBay

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2019 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

The new 992 Porsche 911 is starting to trickle into dealers and this past weekend I went to check it out. The local dealer had exactly one, a 2020 911 C4S, that was a demo car until the actual dealer stock arrived in a few weeks and I have to say, I was impressed. It’s no mistake that it is a 911 and looking at it, you’d maybe confuse it with a 991.2. Well, maybe until you got around back. The single lightbar will take some getting used to and the odd little third brake light was clever, but I think a bit repetitive. When the rear wing moves up, it also carries a brake light. However, that doesn’t “count” for regulations standards as the 3rd brake light has to be on a stationary body part. (You’ll see what I mean in the photo after the jump.) The interior was wonderful outside of the little shift knob that people have been griping about since it was introduced and I can see why. It is downright dainty compared to the hunk of the knob in the 991 cars and I don’t even believe you can shift the PDK with it. The old school center analog tach is a cool feature and I’m glad they didn’t go all digital with the dash like most of the cars in the price range. So everything was going swimmingly until he told me the price.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2019 Porsche 911 C4S on eBay

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1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

While the US market had to settle for the RS America, a lightened low-option version of the Carrera 2, other markets enjoyed the full-on Carrera RS. The Carrera RS used the tried-and-true method of more power/less weight, combining a higher output version of the 964’s 3.6 liter flax-six with significant weight reduction – coming in 155 kg lighter than a standard Carrera 2 – to provide the sort of no frills performance that 911 enthusiasts had long craved since the original RS. Under the rear hood was the M64/03 rated at 260 horsepower which doesn’t sound like a lot by today’s numbers. But the lightweight RS made good use of all of them, proving itself not only to be a class-leading sports car but also one adept at racing in keeping with the 911’s heritage. Suspension was lowered half an inch and stiffened, while the limited-slip differential from the Turbo was borrowed. Power steering was dropped for a manual rack, and while there were packages to add back in road-going manners, this ultimately was a bare-bones racer at heart.

Some 2,276 964 Carrera RSs were made, with a fair chunk of those heading to the track. There were a limited group of these cars imported to the U.S. for a failed race series and a few more since 911 mania took off, but the bulk of production still lies in Europe, just like this ’92 being offered today from France:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS on eBay

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1996 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

This is a Turquoise Green Metallic 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe, located in Florida, with Cashmere Beige interior and 50,324 miles on it. It also has the factory Aerokit. The paint code is 25D, which I mention because there are a few colors that went with some version of Turquoise during the ’90s and in some cases they can be dramatically different colors while in others very similar. Turquoise Blue (code 3AR/3AS) is a phenomenal non-metallic blue and one of my favorites from the period. It has some of the brightness of Riviera Blue, though in a darker hue. It’s great. I believe there also was an earlier version of Turquoise that was non-metallic and much closer to the blue of Turquoise Blue than the color we see here. Similar to this 993 is Turquoise Metallic (code 25C), which is a slight variation of this Turquoise Green. The German helps differentiate the two: Tuerkis Metallic vs Tuerkis Perlcolor. Add in the even more green Wimbledon Green Metallic and then we have nearly the whole spectrum for this one type of greenish blue exterior. Porsche certainly knows how to provide options. All you have to do is figure out which one you like best.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

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Pascha Red 2018 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

It is not uncommon for us to come across Porsches touted by their sellers as “the most highly optioned 911 ever” or some such thing. The window sticker will be a full-page of optional extras and it’ll have a super high MSRP. The problem in many cases is that a lot of those builds aren’t really much more than a buyer checking off every box on the option sheet. It is indeed a highly optioned 911, but you might never know it unless someone sat you down to point out each option. They aren’t really all that special.

This 911 took a slightly different route to arrive at a similar result and I think it’s much better for it. Here we have a Pascha Red 2018 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet with an Espresso over Cognac natural leather interior with Houndstooth inserts. It also has the Sport Design Package, PCCB, and a host of other more standard options. Rather than going through and checking all of the option boxes, this buyer chose the most different options available. As such, simply by the number of options this probably isn’t the highest optioned 911 we’ve seen (though it can’t be far off), but by cost it would be pretty difficult to surpass it. The result is a Carrera Cabriolet with an MSRP of nearly $160K. That’s almost $60K in options! On a base Carrera!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Pascha Red 2018 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet at Select Luxury Cars

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2017 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

I’m going to do something a little unusual here; follow a path I have not normally taken. Here we have a 2017 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe. There isn’t a lot that is special about it. It’s the base Carrera, not an S or GTS. As far as I can tell there aren’t any unique options; it hasn’t been owned by a celebrity; the color combination, which I do like and you do have to pay extra to get, is part of the standard offerings currently available from Porsche. Basically, you could configure a 911 like this one fairly easily on your own and there likely are quite a few out there that are similar to it.

This is pretty much a standard base 911 that’s still pretty new and I don’t usually bother to post those cars. If we get into the details it does have a few miles on it for its age (29,833) and we certainly can’t ignore that. But I wanted to post it because 1) I like the color combination a lot and 2) sometimes it is nice to look at a base 911 that does not stretch well above six figures and probably won’t ever leave a garage unless the weather is absolutely perfect. Also, while you could configure your own, those miles and it being kind of standard means you get a discount and can enjoy your 911 with fewer worries. That’s not so bad!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2017 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

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2011 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS

Buried underneath all of my posts of brightly-colored Porsches exists a seeming enigma: my undying love of black cars. I don’t care if some think they’re boring; heck, my wife thinks they’re boring! Nothing will make me stop in my tracks more quickly than a well cared for black sports coupe. Sure, show me something in a wild color and I’ll definitely stop and look, but I don’t know if I’ll really lust after it. I can’t explain these reactions. This is just how it is.

Which brings me to this car: a 2011 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS, located in Chicago, with 22,413 miles on it. We can’t really call this completely blacked out since the interior is tan, but with the black GTS wheels and a beautiful looking black exterior it really looks phenomenal. As a 911 for cruising somewhat unnoticed it would make for a fantastic choice. Oh, and it has a 6-speed manual transmission, something that is not easy to find on these 911s. I’m in love.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS on Rennlist

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1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet Commemorative Edition

It’s been a while since I’ve seen one of these 911s. This is the Commemorative Edition (aka the Jubilee Edition), which Porsche released in 1988 to celebrate the production of the 250,000th 911. Like other special editions of its time the special enhancements were almost entirely cosmetic. In this case that meant special exterior and interior colors: Diamond Blue Metallic for the exterior, with color-matched Fuchs wheels, and Silver Blue Metallic in the interior (the seller refers to it as Diamond Blue in the interior as well though I’ve always seen it called Silver Blue). It makes for an attractive combination that’s quite elegant as these things go.

You also got Dr. Ferry Porsche’s signature stitched into the seat headrests, a shorter shifter, and an electronic top for the Cabriolet. I suppose the most unique aspect of this particular Commemorative Edition is that it’s had the model designation deleted. You probably don’t care about that. These 911s are pretty rare with only 875 produced in total. I believe the seller’s statement that this is 1 of 100 imported to the US refers to the number of Commemorative Edition Cabriolets rather than the number of Commemorative Edition 911s imported in total. Still, there aren’t a lot of them.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet Commemorative Edition on eBay

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1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa

If you feel like you have seen this car before, you’re not wrong. I have come across it a couple of times recently for sale, though that’s not quite what I mean. When I saw it I didn’t immediately feature it precisely because I thought it looked familiar and I planned to come back to it and see what was up. As it turns out, we’ve featured it before making this somewhat of a revisit.

About 2.5 years ago we featured this Cassis Red Metallic 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa when it was offered for sale by one of our readers. It’s now come back up for sale. I think it is in the hands of a new owner – based on the stated location of the car – and the mileage is up slightly from last time. It now sits at a still very reasonable 72,450. Mostly, I thought it was worth another post because it looks really great!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa on eBay

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Lime Green 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa

When it comes to Porsche’s early pastels I’m not sure any color is more paradigmatic of the genre than Lime Green. Perhaps Pastel Blue, but even that very bright color takes a back seat to the intensity of Lime Green. Put Lime Green on an early Carrera Targa with duck tail rear spoiler and you get a car that just makes me chuckle. Every aspect of it seems hellbent on drawing as much attention as possible. And I have no doubt that’s exactly what it does.

This particular example looks fantastic: a Lime Green 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa, located in New Jersey, with Cinnamon leatherette interior and 74,237 miles on it. Unlike some ads where we wonder how the car really looks this seller pretty much shows us everything. Paint readings even are provided. That shows some confidence in this 911’s quality and it’s certainly not a bad way to sell a car.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Lime Green 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa on eBay

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