1996 Porsche 911 Turbo

Among the craziness of the used car market in the past two years is what has been happening with the 993 Porsche 911 Turbo models. For a long stretch there, you could grab a nice example for somewhere between $100,000 to $135,000. For that amount I think it was well worth the price of entry. It is an unmistakable design, enough pep and power to keep up with modern exotics, and not a total disaster to own like some of the mid-1990s cars that hail from Italy. Now, in 2002, if you want a nice 993 Turbo…oh boy.

This 1996 up for sale in Tennessee is reportedly a one-owner car finished in the sleek Polar Silver Metallic. It has just over 51,000 miles and a fresh engine-out service that ran almost $28,000. I suppose you could say a $28,000 repair bill was worth it when you see this asking price.

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2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe

This 996TT sold for $40,000 on January 28, 2022.

The words “Porsche” and “Turbo” are synonymous with “unaffordable” right now, correct? Well, not so fast.

Today we’re looking at a 996 Turbo, which for some time was the most affordable of the blown 911s. Well, “was” is the important word there, as recently several top-tier examples have flown past the $100,000 mark as if it were their 0-60 time. Today’s example bucks that trend with a $40,000 asking price, but still looks great in Polar Silver Metallic over classic black leather. You can probably guess why it’s cheap, but let’s take a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe on eBay

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2002 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

As the 996 Porsche 911 glow-up continues to gain steam, more and more of them are coming out of the woodwork at eyebrow raising prices. I still think the black sheep of the 911 family is going to stay that, but they just won’t be as cheap as they once were. Worth it? That is up to you of course, but I think a lot of these prices are reflective of people getting priced out of other 911s, simply grabbing what they can afford, and making the best of it.

Today, we have a 2002 Carrera 2 up for sale in New York with just 18,000 miles. Despite being just the base model, it was a not cheap at all. This one rang in at an impressive $96,810 when new, which was crazy to justify given the Turbo started at $110,000. Still, it is just the base 996 at the end of the day. How pricey could it be? Buckle up!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

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1995 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

RS. While the GT3 took the reigns as the hot naturally aspirated 911 with the introduction of the 996 generation, before that those two magical letters ruled the roost. And while for some it was hard to surpass the original, for me the absolute best one made was the last; the 993-generation Carrera RS. It continued the recipe of less is more, with lightweight construction, few options, stiffened-up suspension, and big wheels and tires. At its heart was a 3.8-liter M64/20 flat-6 rated at 300 horsepower, and it was connected only to a six-speed manual. If that wasn’t enough for you, there was an even more hardcore Clubsport model. Porsche made a total of just over 1,100 of these cars, so they’re far more rare than the later models – but they’re also twice as rare as the prior 964-generation RS, and even more dear than the original RS. They were of course never imported to the US, but one’s up for sale here – if you’re feeling quite spendy:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera RS on eBay

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Right Hooker RS: 1995 Audi RS2 Avant

Why would anyone even contemplate paying $65,000 for a 25 year old, complicated and turbocharged Audi wagon? Because of the badge that adorns the front the magical Renn added to the S2 badge, along with the legendary name Porsche scripted below. That meant that this relatively unassuming Audi 80 quattro Avant had been produced in Zuffenhausen on the 959 production line rather than Ingolstadt or Neckarsulm and had added a healthy dose of even more Sport to the small chassis. Ostensibly, though the Sport Quattro was the first RS vehicle, the RS2 was the first to wear the badge which has become synonymous with Audis speed department. For many Audi aficionados, though the RS vehicles have become much faster and more luxurious, just like the with W124 500E and the E30 M3 Audi has never made a car better in its overall execution than the original. Not that it was slow by any means; Porsches massaging of the ADU inline-5 resulted in 311 horsepower even more than the Sport Quattro had from essentially a very similar motor.

So despite being much heavier than the Sport had been, the RS2 wasnt much slower; sub-5 seconds to 60 and a top speed north of 160 mph. Along the way, it was capable of bullying everything outside of a supercar; yet this car also established the move from Audis 2-door halo vehicle to a long line of fast five doors. Porsche also upgraded the brakes and wheels with Brembo units and 17″ ‘Cup 1’ wheels creating a signature look, and tacked on 911 mirrors for good measure. So, too, was the color signature; original called RS Blue rather than the color name its often mistaken for the later Nogaro bright blue is still the go-to shade for Audis fastest. Even within its fast contemporaries, this car was legendary, and the upgrades to the motors and wheels spawned an entire generation of enthusiasts to turn up their inline-5s stateside. Now that these cars are legal for importation, it’s pretty tempting to turn to Europe to see what’s available.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Audi RS2 Avant on eBay

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1984 Volkswagen Jetta GL Turbo Diesel

As we saw with the Dasher Hatchback from last week, just because it’s older and in good shape doesn’t automatically mean it’s worth a lot. If it’s a GTI or a Scirocco, sure – sit back with the popcorn and watch the bids roll in, but that Dasher? It sold for $1,600. Admittedly, it needed at least that amount and probably more in mechanical freshening, but still – you’re looking at a unique classic for well under $5,000 all in.

Today is another such beast, and like the Dasher, it’s a niche car that most will probably pass over for the more exciting metal. But this is one trick little bit of kit as you look a little closer. A1 Jettas are pretty rare to begin with, and this is a claimed rust-free example – always a good place to start. Euro bumpers slim down the look while Corrado Sebrings and a lowered ride height beef it up, but the clean presentation is really highlighted by the rare drivetrain – the CY turbocharged diesel inline-4 mated to a 5-speed manual transmission, good for 68 horsepower and 98 lb.ft of torque. This motor was also briefly available in the first generation Audi 4000. The 10.6 quoted 0-60 time won’t sound particularly exciting, but it was quite a bit quicker than the standard diesel and recorded better fuel economy (Volkswagen claimed it could top 54 mpg!). But the key to this car is the relative obscurity and rarity of the package.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Volkswagen Jetta GL Turbo Diesel on eBay

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