2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S

When it rains, it pours, I suppose. A few weeks ago I took a look at a 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S that featured a paint-to-sample exterior and a Porsche Exclusive interior. Those words sound fine as your read them, but when you actually see the color combo that was picked, it might be a different story. Surprisingly, a fair amount of people actually like it and more power to them, it was different, I give you that. As luck would have it, another 996 Turbo S with a Paint-to-Sample color and a CXX interior popped up for sale, this time in Germany. As you can see, this one is a little more on the conservative side, but even more brilliant in my eyes.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S at Ronny Pannhorst GmbH

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1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S

The end is near for 2019 and the decade as a whole, so I figured we might as well go out with one last bang. Only this bang comes in some wild shades of green and ironically requires enough green to buy that would knock your house down. This 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S is finished in Wimbledon Green Metallic over a Nephrite Green leather interior and needless to say, is one wild 911. I took a look at another 993 Turbo S a few months ago, from the same dealer no less, that was finished in Glacier White and had just 7,600 miles on it and was left wowed by that. This car? Almost certainly a 1 of 1 example given the colors. The miles? How does 532 sound? Total.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

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2018 Porsche 911 Turbo S

After last week’s adventures in Paint to Sample, where a surprising number of people actually liked the color combo, I thought I’d go a little bit more traditional. As far as sports car tradition goes, it really doesn’t get more classic than British Racing Green, although it’s on a German car. This 2018 Porsche 911 Turbo S is not only a street legal rocket ship that is capable getting to 60 mph in just 2.7 seconds and through the quarter-mile in 10.7 seconds, but also tame enough to be driven early single day. It also somehow manages to look like a 911, even though according to those numbers it has to be some kind of space rocket. What isn’t to love here?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 911 Turbo S on Rennlist

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2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S

As fun and as much as I love paint to sample and exclusive options on Porsche 911s, there of course is the potential for those to go very wrong. A few months ago Carter looked at a 2003 911 Turbo that was fine on the outside with a Speed Yellow exterior, but you opened the door to a Nephrite Green full leather interior. I like Speed Yellow and I think Nephrite Green would be awesome compared to the standard black or grey leather, but I don’t think its awesome to combine the two. That leads me to today’s car that I happen to find on a whim, a 2005 911 Turbo S up for sale in Belgium.

This car is finished on the outside in paint to sample Linen, which is a gold and beige kind of color. Different, but not offensive. Inside, you have a Boxster Red leather interior with a healthy dose of aluminum-look trim everywhere. Why this color combo? I have no idea. Although I’m almost positive it had something to do with the car being delivered new to a customer in Muscat, Oman.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S at Fun Cars Belgium

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1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S

To many, there is no higher predator on the Porsche 911 food chain than the 1997 Turbo S. It was everything all packed into a single car. Only 182 examples made it to the US and they were all very expensive as you might of guessed. Most had a sticker price of over $150,000 in 1997, which in 2019 money is north of $240,000. After your tax and all that good stuff, you are out the door at nearly a quarter of a million dollars. That was more than a Ferrari F355 Berlinetta at the time, but its apples and oranges and you can see where values for both of these cars are at today. This example up for sale in Ohio is finished in Glacier White over Cashmere Beige leather interior and has just 7,700 miles on the odometer. The price? This or a two-bedroom apartment in Manhattan’s Upper East Side?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

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1994 Porsche 968 Turbo S

Although it certainly added up to more than the sum of its parts, on paper the Porsche 968 was a bit lacking compared to most of its competition. For example, for $2,000 less than the base price of a non-Sport package equipped 968, you could get a twin-turbocharged 300 horsepower Nissan 300ZX packed full of the latest technology. Or the also twin-turbocharged Dodge Stealth/Mitsubishi 3000GT VR-4 twins. Or the sublime turbocharged Mazda RX-7. And while the Supra Turbo came at a higher price, its performance was also on another level. One thing was clearly missing from the 968 package in order to compete.

Porsche’s Motorsport department, under the leadership of Jurgen Barth, solved this problem in 1993 by offering a turbocharged version of the 968 Clubsport. The 16V head was dropped for a development of the 944 Turbo S head and turbo, but the car retained the 3-liter bottom end. This comprised the M44.60 engine. The result was 305 horsepower and 368 lb.ft of torque. Unlike the 944 Turbos, the 968 Turbo S also got the 6-speed manual (G44.01) and 75% locking differential out of the Clubsport, too. Outside, an homage to the 924 Turbo came in the form of twin NACA ducts on the hood, and the Turbo S gained a huge spoiler in the rear with an adjustable center plane. The Turbo S also nabbed 911 goodies in the form of Turbo brakes and 3-piece Speedline wheels. The Clubsport’s 20mm lowered suspension was dropped even further. For good measure, Porsche Motorsport chopped another 45 lbs off the already lightened Clubsport, too. They featured the lightweight Clubsport interior, no rear seat, and few options. The performance figures were reportedly good enough to best 911 Carrera 3.8 RSRs of the period.

As well as anyone can figure, Porsche only constructed 14 968 Turbo Ss – 11 ’93s (VINS ending 061-071) and 3 ’94s (VINS 001, 061, and 062). Because they’re so rare and were never sold in America, in fact, even some Porsche fans on this side of the pond aren’t aware of their existence. They don’t come up for sale very frequently, but -001 is available right now:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 968 Turbo S on Classic Driver

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1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6 with 6,350 Miles

As I discussed in the ’91 911 Turbo post, while Porsche claimed that a fair amount (85%!) of the “new” Turbo was “new”, in reality it was an evolution of the ’89 Turbo wrapped in a smoother package. However, as our reader Howard pointed out in the comments, one very important change outside of the look was the suspension, which moved away from wooden carts the antiquated torsion bar setup to ‘modern’ coil springs. Coupled with the new limited-slip differential, anti-lock brakes and more sophisticated engine management (hence, smoother power delivery), the ’91 Turbo was a lot more livable in day-to-day situations.

Of course, that meant that it was possible to introduce even more power. Since the ’91 Turbo was a replacement for the defunct 965/969 V8 project, it made sense that Porsche hadn’t developed a new Turbo motor for the initial 964 Turbo launch. But for 1993, Porsche took the 964’s 3.6 liter and mated it with the turbocharger from the 3.3. The result was, of course, the Turbo 3.6. The extra displacement meant power was up 40 to 360 and torque 52 to 384 lb.ft, while both numbers were achieved lower in the rev range. To show off this new-found power, Porsche installed some fantastic Speedline-made Cup wheels and discrete “3.6” badging after the Turbo script. Despite the relative undercover looks, these are sought cars.

Today’s car is listed as one of the 288 Turbo 3.6s imported in ’94, and with a scant 6,350 miles on the odometer you know the price will be high. How high?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S 3.6 ‘Package’ on eBay

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1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S

Update 1/17/19: This ’88 944 Turbo S has been relisted at $27,000, down $2,000 from December.

Here’s an interesting one. At first glance, you’d be forgiven for thinking that this was one of the very special and very limited ‘Silver Rose’ 944 Turbo S models. All painted in unique Silver Rose Metallic (F1) with multi-tone maroon studio cloth, and ushered in a long list of revisions to the standard Turbo. The new option M758 “Turbo S” included a new turbocharger with redesigned vanes and a remapped DME which increased boost to a max of 1.82 bar. The resulting M44/52 had 30 more horsepower and 15 lb.ft torque to a max of 247 and 258, respectively. But the “S” package was far more than just more boost, as the cooling system was revised, the clutch and transmission were beefed up with hardened first and second gears.

Brakes were borrowed from the 928 S4 and now measured 12″ in front with four piston aluminum calipers. Wheels were Club Sport 16″ forged, polished and anodized units measuring 7 inches in front and 9 in the rear. Suspension was also beefed up with the M030 package; this included adjustable rebound Koni shocks and adjustable-perch coilovers in front. Limited slip differentials (Code 220) were not standard, but a must-select option. So too was a beefed up radio.

But the interesting thing about this particular car is that it’s not a Silver Rose. The original purchaser of this car ticked the $5,510 option box for the Turbo S M758 options, then paid a further $685 to have it painted Stone Gray Metallic:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo on eBay

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2019 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe

I feel like living a little lavishly today. Here we have a GT Silver Metallic 2019 Porsche 911 Turbo S. It’s brand new and waiting to be purchased. The Turbo S itself combines the best of luxury and performance that Porsche can offer. It’s supercar performance that ensconces you in leather and comfort. There’s 580 hp directed to all four wheels. The dual-clutch 7-speed PDK transmission either can shift smooth and comfortably or put it in Sport Plus mode and it’ll bang home shifts as quickly and ferociously as possible. Rear-axle steering, center-lock wheels, and massive 410 mm six-piston ceramic brakes keep everything under control. The Turbo S isn’t quite the top of the luxury performance food chain since Porsche also offers the Turbo S Exclusive, but this will have to do for now.

This particular example has decided to turn the dial up just a little bit and that’s the reason I’m interested in it. For starters, it has carbon fiber wheels. They’ll set you back a mere $14,980. Please do not bump them into a curb. It’s fitted with the Turbo Aerokit, which adds a little dynamism to the exterior because you wouldn’t want passersby confusing this with a regular 911. The interior too receives a few carbon fiber accents helping to tie interior and exterior together. Also in that interior is the optional Burmester sound system. Frankly, if you’re willing to spring for the carbon wheels, I’d be disappointed if you didn’t also add the better sound.

All together I really like this Turbo S. I wish it wasn’t Silver, but it does seem to be making the most of what these cars have to offer and in that regard it’s a phenomenal example. And while not quite the Turbo S Exclusive it does come in around $50K less than one of those very limited models (and that’s without factoring in ADM).

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2019 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe on Rennlist

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2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S

Perhaps the excellent value has all but dried up. Granted with just under 20K miles on it, the mileage on this Black on Black 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S is pretty low and that certainly is going to raise the asking price, but at almost $90K it’d be tough to put this one on your performance value radar. But frankly the low mileage 996TT have been moving well up in price for a while now so perhaps this is nothing new. Still, it was fun while it lasted.

The Turbo S itself is a fairly rare and special version of the 996TT. Available only for one year, they more or less were a version of the standard Turbo outfitted with the X50 performance package and PCCB. A few other cosmetic details help differentiate them as well. For some reason the majority of those produced were Cabriolets. A fair number of those Cabriolets came equipped with the Tiptronic S transmission. As such, manual-equipped Turbo S Coupes are always worth a look even if they can be a bit pricey.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

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