2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S

Perhaps the excellent value has all but dried up. Granted with just under 20K miles on it, the mileage on this Black on Black 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S is pretty low and that certainly is going to raise the asking price, but at almost $90K it’d be tough to put this one on your performance value radar. But frankly the low mileage 996TT have been moving well up in price for a while now so perhaps this is nothing new. Still, it was fun while it lasted.

The Turbo S itself is a fairly rare and special version of the 996TT. Available only for one year, they more or less were a version of the standard Turbo outfitted with the X50 performance package and PCCB. A few other cosmetic details help differentiate them as well. For some reason the majority of those produced were Cabriolets. A fair number of those Cabriolets came equipped with the Tiptronic S transmission. As such, manual-equipped Turbo S Coupes are always worth a look even if they can be a bit pricey.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

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1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S

Oh my lord this is everything. Here we have an Arctic Silver Metallic 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S, located in New York, with Boxster Red interior and a mere 2,544 miles on it. Do I wish the exterior were something other than silver? Maybe, yes. However, Arctic Silver is a pretty nice variant of the color and the contrast it presents with the Boxster Red interior works so incredibly well that I almost don’t mind it’s a silver car. On the 993 Turbo S the color works quite well anyway.

There were only 345 examples of the Turbo S built in total and they provide the best combination Porsche could offer at the time in terms of performance and luxury. 430 hp was propelled to all four wheels through a 6-speed manual transmission. Larger disc brakes with the now well known yellow calipers provided restraint for those extra horses and the revised Aerokit helped keep the wheels planted. They are exquisite looking cars and, of course, the last of the air-cooled 911 Turbos. Naturally, that makes them quite highly sought after.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

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Signal Green 2011 Porsche 911 Turbo S

I’ve been looking for a 997.2 to post for a while. Though in truth I didn’t really find what I was looking for. I’ve had my eye out for a Turbo with a manual transmission, a search which has proved more difficult than I thought it’d be. But this, a Turbo S in Signal Green, certainly serves as a worthwhile substitute. Since the Turbo S wasn’t available with a manual transmission anyway, then I guess I can’t quibble over it possessing PDK.

530 hp delivered through a 7-speed dual-clutch transmission in the most luxurious package Porsche can offer certainly will turn heads. When you drape that kind of machine in one of Porsche’s iconic colors, then now you have looks to go with that performance. This one isn’t entirely original and is said to be putting out an additional 90 hp over the already significant power it offered out of the box. It’s also said to be only 1 of 2 to exist.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Signal Green 2011 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

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2018 Porsche 911 Turbo S Exclusive

It shouldn’t take you long to recognize that this is a fairly limited production 911. It’s right there in its name, “Exclusive,” though you also could just look at the darn thing. A Golden Yellow Metallic Porsche isn’t exactly commonplace. Add in the Black center-locking wheels with Golden Yellow accents, loads of carbon trim, and Turbo Aerokit and you know you’re looking at something special. This is all before we even open the doors and step into the interior.

And, oh yeah, it has 607 horsepower. That’s 27 hp more than the already pretty high-powered 911 Turbo S.

I came across this 2018 Porsche 911 Turbo S Exclusive and figured I’d add it to our list of very high-priced and limited production 911s I’ve posted lately. If you want one only 500 will be produced. I don’t know how many currently are on the ground, but I have only seen one other for sale. It was not Gold. While I expect we’ll see a few more of these pop up just as we have with the various GT 911s I don’t know if we’ll see quite as many. Markup, of course, is substantial, though not GT2 RS high.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 911 Turbo S Exclusive on eBay

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2017 Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet

This 911 absolutely screams “Beach!” to me. Of course, with 580 hp coming from its 3.8 liter twin-turbocharged flat-six this Turbo S will scream just about anywhere. But all of that power isn’t really what attracted me. The 911 Turbo S is Porsche’s ultimate luxury performance machine and in Cabriolet form it certainly slants further to the luxury tourer side than a Coupe would. The power always will be there lurking beneath your right foot in case you ever need it, but for those who want all of that power and fewer amenities Porsche offers the GT2. That’s not what this 911 is about.

And it is in that regard that I think this Turbo S was put together quite well. There’s a nice attention to detail in this build and for those looking to cruise and be seen I don’t know that you’d find a better option from Porsche. This is a Miami Blue 2017 Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet, located in Houston, with Chalk over Graphite Blue interior and 8,760 miles on it. With over 8K miles and barely a year old its previous owner certainly seems to have enjoyed it!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2017 Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet on eBay

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2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe

This is a long time favorite of ours at GCFSB even if pricing has moved them beyond what made them a favorite. Nonetheless the 996TT remains a heck of a performance machine and even with values creeping up there is still a lot of value to be found with these cars. To put it simply: the trouble now is that they have begun to creep much too close to the price of a 997TT, at which point I think most will choose the 996’s successor. For those who might prefer 996 styling (I promise they do exist) or for those with some collector interest the final model year of these seemingly unloved Turbos can make for a nice option.

In 2005 Porsche gave us the 911 Turbo S. It was a car quite similar to the previous 996TT when equipped with the X50 Performance package and PCCB. But like with most any Porsche if you put an ‘S’ in the name then it attracts more attention. Numbers were somewhat limited, especially the Coupes. For reasons I’m not all that clear about, most of the 996TTS that were produced were Cabriolets. Many of those were equipped with Tiptronic S rather than a 6-speed manual. So what see here, an Arctic Silver Metallic 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe with manual transmission and 47,153 miles on it, doesn’t come around all that often.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe on eBay

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2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe

This 911 brings with it a nice confluence of attributes that should make it quite desirable. Assuming, of course, you’re seeking out all of those attributes. Here we have a 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe located in Knoxville. It has the desirable 6-speed manual transmission and has done 61,419 miles. It also is equipped with the very rare Turbo Aerokit. We saw this aerokit recently on a standard 996TT and on that car it created quite a juxtaposition between the exterior and interior aspects of the car. On this Turbo S, there is no juxtaposition. It’s full menace and the aerokit simply provides an additional dose of aggression. In all black it may not turn heads, slipping by almost unnoticed, but for any driver it’s sure to leave an impression.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe on eBay

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1993 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau

During my time writing about 911s I’m sure I’ve stated that quite a few different models might be my favorite. At one time or another certain cars always strike me and remind me of what it is that I love so much about them. Each model has its strengths and pulls at my imagination in varying ways.

Let it be known that this is my actual favorite model: the 1993 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau (lightweight). It’s the GT2 before the GT2 existed: a stripped out, higher horsepower, version of the standard 911 Turbo produced in limited numbers. Unlike the later ’94 Turbo S this one is based off of the 964’s original 3.3 liter turbocharged flat-6 and produces 381 hp, an increase of 61 hp over the standard Turbo. Weight savings stripped out nearly 430 pounds.

Visually the Turbo S is distinguished by its unique rear spoiler, Speedline wheels, and rear air inlets. There were 86 in total produced, with 67 of those coming in left-hand drive. The one we see here is even further distinguished by utilizing custom coloring throughout and it sits with a scant 95 km on the clock. Needless to say, this is a very rare opportunity to purchase one of the very rarest high-performance Porsches. It will be up for auction March 9 at the Gooding & Company Amelia Island auctions.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau at Gooding & Co.

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1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S Slantnose

With the January auctions approaching I always like to check in on what sorts of interesting cars will be crossing the blocks this year. Even though this auction is still a couple weeks away, I couldn’t resist posting this now. I could be wrong, but I think this is the only air-cooled 911 model I have never featured. It’s one of the rarest 911 models there is. We’ve featured the North American only Turbo S Package car previously, of which there were only 17 produced. For this model there are even fewer.

This is a Japanese market 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S Slantnose, also known as the X83 Turbo S. And, yes, I do mean Slantnose and not Flatnose. Of the various markets only Japan received the 935-derived slantnose that was commonly found on the 930. The rest of the world received either the 968-derived flatnose or the standard 964 front of the Turbo S Package. Only 10 Slantnose Turbo S were produced, all nearly identical with Polar Silver Metallic exterior and Black interior. The biggest difference among the 10 was the choice of rear wing: you could have either the standard Turbo rear spoiler or for a little extra money you could choose the spoiler from the 3.8 Carrera RS. 4 buyers chose the RS wing.

I have never seen one for sale. Until now. This one will be up for auction at Gooding and Company’s Scottsdale Auctions on January 19 & 20.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S Slantnose at Gooding & Co.

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Motorsports Monday: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo Cup

Continuing on the 944 theme, there are of course a few transaxles that actually are worth some big bucks right now. The development models – the 924 Carrera GT, GTS and GTR – are pretty well priced out of this world. In the 944 run, the Silver Rose cars are highly valued, too – but value-wise, they’re relative bargains compared to this car. Yet I’ll still claim that this car is a relative bargain compared to its contemporaries. Let me explain.

As a promotional series in 1986, Porsche teamed with Rothmans for sponsorship of a one-make support race series in Canada. The result was the 944 Cup, which ran normally aspirated lightweight examples of otherwise stock 944s in 1986 and 1987. Every once in a while, one of these rare rides (there were only 31 sold) pops up and we’ve covered them before. The big draw on these cars are the lightweight aspect thanks to no sunroof and manual windows, and of course the Rothmans livery.

But the series proved successful and in 1987 Porsche followed up with the more developed, more powerful and more excited Rothmans 944 Turbo Cup. In fact, the Turbo Cup cars were developed for single-race series around the globe – in total, there were 5 series and just shy of 200 Turbo Cup cars produced. Like the prior 944 RC, the formula was pretty simple – lighten a 944 Turbo, leave the engine “stock”, and fit it with race equipment. But Porsche, being Porsche, went a bit above and beyond.

Though the Turbo Cup looked for all intents and purposes like just a 1987 Turbo with racing colors and a cage, the reality was far from that. The engine retained most of its stock components, but Porsche fit magnesium oil pans and intakes to lighten the load. The turbocharger was uprated as well to develop more twist. Magnesium carried over to the transmission bits and even the wheels, which copied the production series designs but were much lighter. Inside the Turbo Cup gained a cage and a Recaro race seat, but lost its climate control, the glove box, the radio console and even door pockets. Power steering and air conditioning were yanked. Gone too were the rear wiper, remote hatch release and power windows. Like Audis from the period, the brake system was anti-lock, but included an on-off switch to disable the system. Bilstein provided upgraded damping, and Porsche also fit larger roll bars front and rear. The result was that they managed to get the road going 944 Turbo down to 1,280 kg (2,800 lbs) while simultaneously making it more powerful.

As some of the most limited 944s out there, and coupled with a popular race series featuring some of the most famous names in 80s sports car racing, the Turbo Cup cars have developed a cult following and bring some of the strongest bids in the transaxle world:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo Cup on eBay

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