Motorsports Monday: 1975 Porsche 911 RSR

Let’s say for a moment that you came into an extraordinary amount of money and wanted to go vintage automobile racing. Of course, to prove your worth as an enthusiast, you’ll want to buy a historically significant car that will impress all the long bottom jaws, and few raise more eyebrows in the German realm right now than the 911. Truth told, the 911 is really the ‘new money’ of the vintage world – go try racing antique Bugattis or Ferraris, for example, and you’ll soon laugh at the budgets of Porsche racers…but I digress.

Ironically, there was a point in history where your scenario from today wouldn’t have been all that different from the past. Take the case of Diego Febles. Diego was born in Cuba under the notorious dictator Batista, but left in 1957 for “political reasons” you may have heard of at one point. Finally landing in Puerto Rico, Diego took to racing, and specifically racing Porsches. In the 1970s, this led him to be linked up with Peter Gregg’s Brumos Porsche group, and Diego proceeded to buy and build cars which mimicked Gregg’s famous liveries.

In his own right, Febels was fairly accomplished as a racer. He raced some of the most famous races in the world; of course the 24 Hours of Daytona and the 12 Hours of Sebring were naturals that Gregg and Brumos had excelled at, but he also raced at Road America, Mosport, Mid Ohio and finally even at Le Mans. This particular car is claimed to be his last ‘RSR’, but looks can be deceiving:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1975 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR at Atlantis Motor Group

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Motorsports Monday: 1986 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V

Motorsports Monday has become a bit predictable. First, I am apparently the only one interested in it. Second, it probably involves a Porsche or BMW. And lastly, that means that it boils down to generally two models – the 911 or M3. Yet every week I still type “Race Car” into the search function of eBay, resilient in the belief that eventually something new will pop up. Every once in a while I’m rewarded with a GTi or very rarely an Audi that has been set up for track duty, but today’s feature is a pretty unique beast. Apparently raced since new, this Volkswagen Scirocco 16V was constructed to compete in IMSA. Normally the domain of Group C/GTP prototypes in the 1980s, IMSA had support series such as International Sedan (IS) and Radial Sedan (RS) race series, later to become the popular Showroom Stock class populated by more domesticated beasts you generally would see on the road:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V on eBay

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1971 Porsche 911ST Recreation

Keeping within the theme of my recent 911 posts, here we have the vintage look of the 911 long hood paired with the modern technology of the Porsche 964. As prices for a classic 911 have escalated in recent years this has had the effect of creating a market for vintage recreations. As anyone familiar with Top Gear will know, these recreations do not come cheaply (for those who haven’t seen it: in a recent episode James drove the Singer 911, a car in similar spirit to the one featured here, and a couple series back Jeremy profiled the Eagle Speedster, a homage to the E-Type Jag). The purpose of such recreations is simple: classic style mated with modern performance. The car featured here uses a 300 hp 3.6 liter flat-6 from the 964 along with adjustable suspension, upgraded brakes, and a 1200kg curb weight and covers it in the iconic style of a 1971 911ST. The 911ST was a limited production model, produced only from 1970-1971, that was both lighter and more powerful than the standard 911 of its day and primarily intended for racing.

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Year: N/A
Model: 911ST/964
Engine: 3.6 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 500 km (~ 310 mi)
Price: €129,911 (~ $171,128 USD)

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1971 Porsche 911ST Recreation from Automax.GmbH

This Porsche model uses a 964 basis as the foundation for the recreation of the Porsche 911ST that was built from 1970 to 1971. At that time, the 911ST was a very successful GT racer. The purpose of this build was to enable the advanced technology of the Porsche 964 to be paired with the classic look of the 911 of the 70s. Almost all of the details of the 1971 911ST are reflected in the car. Special options and cult colors of the 70s (Blood Orange, Signal Yellow, Viper Green, Mexico Blue, Albert Blue, Grand Prix White, Light Ivory, Irish Green, Black or Silver) are available. All modifications were carried out in order to enable us to offer an everyday Porsche model with modern technology, safety and comfort with the look of a 70s icon. Additional information can be found on our website. We will gladly provide a color brochure and price list upon request. For more information, please contact Mr. Stefan Pape.

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The seller of this car has been a little short on the details, most importantly there’s little information provided about the builder of this particular car. It looks very similar to a car built by PS Automobile, which you can see profiled here. Whether it is that car, I’m not sure. To me, these recreations are fantastic: vintage style, modern performance, and a car that can be driven without worrying about collector car value. With that said, they aren’t cheap cars. But for the nostalgic buyer who’d prefer not giving up any performance, cars such as this one should provide the best of both worlds. They are a testament to both style and performance, and a showcase of the history of one of the best sports cars every built.

-Rob

1936 BMW 328

BMW fans, here’s where it all started. You may think the 2002 started it all, but in reality, the 328 was Genesis. Truth be told, BMW was quite successful in the 1930s and before in the motorcycle scene, and indeed was a well regarded manufacturer of airplane engines. But in the changing climate of German politics in the 1930s, it was clear that the government wanted to steer the population away from its chosen method of transportation – motorcycles – and towards automobile ownership. To this end, BMW’s main competition at this time, Daimler-Benz and Auto-Union, were quick to enter into the premier form of Grand Prix racing in order to promote both the government’s agenda and their own technical superiority in automotive engineering. Thus would be born the legendary Silberpfeil – the Silver Arrows of Grand Prix racing. Behind the scenes, BMW pursued a slightly different course, and as the Italian and French automakers fled the all-conquering German Grand Prix cars in favor of sports car racing, BMW took them on with their newly designed 328 sports car. Few survive today, but every once in a while one comes up for sale, such as this silver example today:

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Year: 1936
Model: 328
Engine: 2.0 liter inline-6
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Mileage: “10” mi
Price: $350,000

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1936 BMW 328 on eBay

Before we proceed to the details about this truly work of Art and Craftsmanship I felt to share a little history about the uniqueness of the 1936 BMW 328 Roadster. Enjoy reading it ………..

……………….”A small brochure circulated among a select group of people in late 1935 revealed the existence of a new 2-litre sports car to be known as the “Typ 328”. The description of the car was deliberately low-key and avoided giving any performance or speed figures. The brochure was intended purely as an appetiser for “friends of the company”; there was no announcement in the press.

Journalists were left open-mouthed when they set eyes on the car for the first time in the Nürburgring paddock on 13 June 1936. There, Ernst Henne was preparing to race the 328 in the International Eifel Race the following day. The motorcycle world record holder roared away from his rivals off the start line and soon left the rest of the field trailing in his wake with a phenomenal average speed of 101.5 km/h. This show of strength from the 328 had commentators purring about the future of the German sports car. However, few could have guessed that they were witnessing the dawn of a new era.

Of the 464 examples of the BMW 328 ever built, only around 200 have survived, some 120 of which are in Germany. Many still take part in historical races to this day. And cars from BMW Classic’s own collection can regularly be found in the thick of the action – often with illustrious figures at the wheel. Indeed, in 2003 Sweden’s King Carl XVI Gustav teamed with Prince Leopold of Bavaria for the reborn Mille Miglia – now run as a regularity test – in a BMW 328 Touring Roadster.

To be reminded of just how potent the 1940 cars still are today, you need only witness their journey to Italy for the event. There is not a transporter or trailer in sight; instead, just as they did 70 years ago, they travel from Munich to Brescia on their own power. And even more impressively, they complete the journey on a single tank of fuel; then, as now, the engines were not only powerful but also efficient. The drivers and cars can encounter a wide variety of weather conditions en route to Brescia and during the event itself, but nothing can dampen the spirits of the drivers and cars alike. Whether they’re basking in 27 degrees Celsius on the Adriatic or shivering just above freezing in the snow and mist of Monte Terminillo, the teams experience everything the Italian climate can throw at them. And today, just as they did back then, they power to victory in sumptuous style.”…………………..

Amazing ,isn’t it? Now about this beauty, she spent most of her life in a great and loving care of a Pre-War Era Car collector and Restaurateur Garage. Recently finished “open check book” restoration brought back her to life and old glory, as you can see on the pictures. Ready for racing or to be be part of the most discriminating collectors collection. I’ll assist with shipping and insurance if needed. Please email for questions ,serious bidders only! Thank you.

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While the E30 M3 certainly was a successful race car in its own right, the 328 was no slouch. The list of wins is simply incredible. How about both class and overall wins at the Mille Miglia? Fifth overall at Le Mans? RAC Tourist Trophy? 100 class wins in one year? The 328 defined a history of success that BMW would continue after the war. More surprising is how successful the 328 was given that BMW engaged in little automobile racing prior to its construction. These successes were just about the equivalent of saying “You know, I think today I’ll start riding a bike” and then winning the Tour de France in the next month. While there are a few BMW models that exceed the value of the 328, I’d argue there is not a model which was more significant to establishing the brand. Quite simply, the 328 put BMW on the European map as a performance car company.

Now, as to value, that’s tough to judge. What do you compare it to? The Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS Spider? $500,000 or more, if you can find one. The Maserati 4CS-1500? Close to $1,000,000. Perhaps the Bugatti T55 Super Sport? That would set you back the best part of $2,000,000 plus. So, why the lack of value on the 328? At $350,000 this seems like a downright deal. Of course, the Bugatti, Maserati and Alfa have aching beauty that the 328 just can’t quite match, and consequently they’re more aesthetically desirable. However, even in comparison to some recent auctions, this 328 seems undervalued. The answer may lie in the lack of details of this auction; the quality of the restoration and the reason for it (crash?) would have to be fully sorted out before buying this car. Still, since none of you are actually going to buy this car stop worrying about how much it’s worth – just enjoy the view, appreciate the history, and before they’re all gone, go see one race at some vintage races!

-Carter