Tuner Tuesday Double Take: 2002 and 2003 BMW M5 Dinan S2s

Tuner Tuesday Double Take: 2002 and 2003 BMW M5 Dinan S2s

There are a few select automotive tuners who can take an impressive package and refine it into an even better entity. That group includes legends such as AMG, Alpina and Ruf – all of which are staples of this segment.

Yet they are far from alone. Given the task of improving on what is generally considered to be one of the greatest sedans ever made is no small feat, but if there was one group up to it, it was Steve Dinan’s eponymous company in California.

While just about anyone can take a turbocharged engine and crank up the boost, slap a few stickers on it and call it done, the E39 M5 didn’t come with forced induction. On top of that, it was a motor which wasn’t exactly underdeveloped before it went into production. Nor were the brakes, suspension, or any other aspect of the third gen M5. But Dinan thought they could improve upon them, and with a tremendous amount of work, did.

Dinan went to town on the S62 from start to end. Out came the factory air boxes, air meters and velocity stacks, replaced by Dinan units of larger diameter and better flow qualities, along with larger throttle bodies bored out by the company. This necessitated reprogramming of the computer controls for the engine to match the new flow characteristics. To help the exhaust side of the motor, unique tubular headers were fit to a free-flowing, lightweight exhaust system. While this sounds a bit like old-school engineering, it was successful; the result was an additional 76 horsepower and 51 lb.ft of torque – basically, this was like adding a 1980 Rabbit’s worth of power to an already powerful car.

Dinan coupled the engine mods with a shorter final drive and higher rev-limiter to reach fantastic speeds. The S2 was capable of 0-60 runs around 4 seconds flat and, in unrestricted mode, geared out around 190 mph in 6th.…

Motorsports Monday: 1968 BMW 2002 IMSA RS

Motorsports Monday: 1968 BMW 2002 IMSA RS

The end of Summer has many traditions; the days wane as children head back to school. Temperatures fall as families head towards apple orchards and plan for haunted hay rides. Pumpkin spice is everywhere. But there’s one tradition I’ve particularly enjoyed for the last few years; the live stream from West Sussex, England of the Goodwood Revival.

For me, a lover of vintage cars and especially vintage race cars, it’s a special treat. Both of the events put on by Lord March are impressive in their own right, and if you want to see a little bit of everything the season opener Festival of Speed is probably the venue you should consider. But if you want to see cars and motorcycles from periods you weren’t even alive for race flat-out, the Revival is the one to tune in to. Heavily modified Jaguars, Ferraris, Aston-Martins, and just about everything in between head to the track as combinations of professional and amateur drivers (at least, those with quite deep pockets) take their prized possessions to the limit and sometimes beyond. You might be lucky enough once in your life to witness an original GT40 in person; head to the Revival, and you’ll run across a dozen or so of the model, many of which are driven nearly as quickly as they were originally. This is coupled with period livery and dress on one of the fastest circuits in England, filmed with some of the best cameras out there. The result, as a car lover, is one of the most evocative spectacles conceivable.

Each time I witness a Goodwood event, my love of these race-prepared vintage cars is re-inspired. And though this particular BMW 2002 is just a few years too new to be eligible for competition at the Goodwood circuit, it caught my attention because of the claimed IMSA link.…

2002 Audi S6 Avant

2002 Audi S6 Avant

Just the other day on one of the internet chat groups I probably spend far too much time looking at, someone posed the question “Should I buy an Allroad?”

There are two camps of thought on the Allroad. On the one side is the group of individuals, many of whom still own them, for which Audi’s light-off-roader is the best vehicle ever designed. Quickly in speaking with them you realize few of them remain stock, which points towards the cause of the other side of the story.

For those who aren’t fully in love with the Allroad, they’re one of the least reliable, most unnecessarily complicated Audis ever built. And from a company that likes unnecessarily complicated designs, that’s saying something. The electrics fail. The suspensions fail. The turbos (count ’em, two!) fail. Look, I’m a huge Audi fan, but I can acknowledge that you have to really, really want an Allroad to buy into the kind of maintenance you need to perform to keep it going. My mechanic bought my parent’s 6-speed example, and now he’s afraid to drive it because every time he does it breaks. All he talks about is how expensive it is to fix. An ex-Master Audi mechanic. Think about that.

What was interesting to me as this discussion quickly devolved into “It’s the best car ever! (but here’s the laundry list of how to make it the best car ever…)” versus “You can’t afford to own one, because you have to own three so that at any given time one is theoretically working” was that no one brought up the S6. To me, the S6 is the perfect solution for wanting an Allroad. It looks better. It’s got a nicer interior. It’s got more power, and exactly zero turbos that blow. And it’s got an all-steel suspension that doesn’t fail.…

2002 Porsche 911 GT2

2002 Porsche 911 GT2

The Granddaddy. Top dog. Ultimate 911. Widowmaker. I don’t know. Whatever we want to call it the GT2 has been the pinnacle of 911 performance since its introduction as part of the 993 model lineup. Like with some of its predecessors the intention behind GT2 production was to meet homologation requirements for racing purposes. Naturally power is higher and weight is lower. Unlike every other 911 Turbo since the 993 the GT2 also stuck with purely rear-wheel drive rather than the now standard all-wheel drive. Everything about the GT2 is jaw dropping and on those rare occasions I’ve seen one on the road it’s been very difficult to take my eye off of it.

The 911 Turbo always has served as a showcase of Porsche’s ability to deftly meld high performance and luxury. They are cars you can drive every day with little sense of performance compromise. The GT2 is what you get when you remove some of those luxuries and push the performance limits. Here we have a very low mileage example located in Montana: an Arctic Silver Metallic 2002 Porsche 911 GT2 with 3,124 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Porsche 911 GT2 on eBay

Year: 2002
Model: 911 GT2
Engine: 3.6 liter twin-turbocharged flat-6
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: 3,124 mi
Price: $169,000 Buy It Now

If you are reading this you probably don’t need me to tell you about the rarity and collectability of this car. You probably want to add a 996 GT2 to your collection and you will not find another example as worthy of being in your collection than this very low mileage example. I found this car sitting in a garage in Kona Hawaii a couple years ago. It had only been driven a couple thousand miles by its previous owners.

2002 Porsche 911 Turbo

2002 Porsche 911 Turbo

Too many 911 Turbos come in Black or Silver. That’s no fun. We see Guards Red too, though by the time we’ve reached the 996 even red has become a much more fleeting alternative. So I always like coming across those in other colors. Speed Yellow is probably not even that uncommon, but it provides plenty of brightness to help attract attention with all of that horsepower. Granted, nothing will top the Signal Green Turbo S we featured last year, but bright yellow does a good enough job and it’s for sale for half the price of green. Not too bad!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

Year: 2002
Model: 911 Turbo
Engine: 3.6 liter twin-turbocharged flat-6
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: 35,659 mi
Price: $49,888 Buy It Now

2002 Porsche 911 Carrera

2002 PORSCHE 911 AWD 996 TWIN-TURBO SPEED YELLOW/BLACK FULL LEATHER, 6-SPEED MANUAL TRANSMISSION, YELLOW STITCHING, 12-WAY POWER SEATS, DRIVER MEMORY SEAT, 10 SPEAKER PREMIUM SOUND SYSTEM, CD CHANGER, SELF DIMMING MIRRORS, 3-SPOKE SPORT LEATHER STEERING WHEEL, POWER SUN ROOF, 18″TURBO WHEELS, BI-XENON HEAD LIGHTS, SECURITY ALARM SYSTEM, POWER HEATED SIDE MIRRORS, (PSM) PORSCHE STABILITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM, TRACTION CONTROL SYSTEM, PORSCHE CREST IN HEADREST, REAR WINDOW WIPER, B&M SHORT THROW SHIFTER, BILSTEIN (PSS09) SUSPENSION KITS FEATURE RIDE HEIGHT ADJUSTABILITY WITH 10-STAGE MANUALLY ADJUSTABLE DAMPERS IN AN OEM QUALITY, 3-M CLEAR ARMOR FRONT PROTECTION, CLEAN CAR FAX REPORT, NO ACCIDENTS, NO DINGS, NO DENTS, NO SCRATCHES, NO ODOR, RECENTLY SERVICED INCLUDING SPARK-PLUGS, OIL CHANGE, AIR-FILTERS, WIPER BLADES, ETC, LOCAL CALIFORNIA CAR COMES COMPLETE WITH ALL BOOKS, TOOLS, KEYS, ORIGINAL MSRP WINDOW STICKER $122,710.00. FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL SAM 408 307 4093

I’ve kind of been going back and forth lately with my 996TT features with some of them being very low mileage and testing the potential collector market – while also stretching our sense of their performance value – and others coming in at much more reasonable prices as the miles go up.…

Feature Listing: 2002 Volkswagen GTI 337 Edition

Feature Listing: 2002 Volkswagen GTI 337 Edition

As I talked about in the recent post about the 20th Anniversary Edition GTI, the 2002 ‘337’ was the GTI to get when they launched. The moniker derived from the original project code – EA337 – for the first generation GTI, and effectively the 2002 337 was a carbon copy of the 25th Anniversary model that was a Europe-only special from 2001. Hunkered down with the 1BE sport suspension, the 337 wore 18″ specially painted BBS RC wheels with low profile 225-section tires. Red calipers grabbed 12.4″ front vented discs and 10″ in the rear, also with veining. Powering the 337 was a 1.8 liter, 20V turbocharged motor, good for 180 horsepower, mounted to a new MQ350 6-speed manual gearbox. Underneath was a stainless steel exhaust system tuned to emit a bit more noise than a standard model. Inside the GTI got Recaro “Le Mans” red and black cloth seats, a special golf ball shift knob, aluminum interior accents and Monsoon radio system. Finally, a unique Votex body kit and retro badging helped to distinguish this model as the one to get for 1,500 lucky U.S. customers:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Volkswagen GTI Edition 337 on Autotrader

2002 BMW M3 with 11,000 Miles

2002 BMW M3 with 11,000 Miles

A familiar face popped into my usual searches this week. It was a 2001 BMW M3 in Laguna Seca Blue. What stood out immediately were the wheels (okay, and the color); BBS CH and near faultless condition throughout pointed towards the example I looked at twice in 2014. Three years later, it’s still for sale and though the price has dropped, the seller is still looking for the best part of $60,000.

In the future, that price may not seem quite that outrageous. After all, finding a perfect condition, 10,000 mile M3 in one of the two signature colors isn’t something you come across everyday, right?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 BMW M3 on eBay

2002 Porsche 911 Turbo

2002 Porsche 911 Turbo

I’m going to move now to the other side of the 911 Turbo spectrum. Away from ultra-low mileage air-cooled Turbos to a water-cooled model with some miles on it. I’ve been looking around for better values among these cars, something that has become increasingly difficult as has been evidenced by a few of my recent 996TT features. Most of those I see with lower prices are Tiptronic. If you’re fine with that, then there’s plenty of choice. But I want to keep searching for the more desirable manual-equipped versions.

Here may be just one such beast: a Carrera White 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo, located in Georgia, with Natural Brown leather interior and 76,985 miles on it. I’ll say from the start that even though the asking price is sub-$50K it’s still a good bit higher than what we used to see with these Turbos, especially those not equipped with the X50 performance package. But it’s a much more reasonable price than the low-mileage cars we’ve seen and the condition looks good.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

Year: 2002
Model: 911 Turbo
Engine: 3.6 liter twin-turbocharged flat-6
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: 76,985 mi
Price: $47,900 Buy It Now

2002 Porsche 911 Turbo.

Vin WP0AB29932S685775.

76,985 Miles.

Carrara White.

Natural Brown Leather Interior.

6-Speed Manual.

Clean Carfax.

$119,850 MSRP.

Books, Manuals, Service Records, 2-Keys, Car Cover, Tools, Spare and a Jack.

This great looking 996 Twin Turbo comes in a very desirable and highly sought out Carrara White, which bares the the nickname “Unicorn” among the Porsche enthusiasts.

The white exterior is beautifully matched up with a Brown Leather Interior, that is complimented with factory correct Sport Seats. The interior is in phenomenal shape and every instrument and gadget works.

Performance wise, this car is an absolute beast, and the Turbo effect is immediately evident.

Roll the Dice? “1973” BMW 2002 Turbo

Roll the Dice? “1973” BMW 2002 Turbo

Most of our ‘Roll the Dice’ series involve cheap asking prices, needy restoration candidates, or oddball cars that are great values. This is not one of those.

The BMW 2002 is a legendary giant killer, and the predecessor of the market darling M3. Introduced before the M1 and 3.0CSL, BMW’s Motorsport division designed and modified the E10-based model to such an extent that it received its own model code – E20. A KKK turbocharger was fit to the M10 2.0 inline-4, generating 8 lbs. of boost at 3,500 rpm and a screaming 170 horsepower. Only available in two colors, the expensive ($6,600 list price in 1974) 2002 Turbo sold in scant numbers – a total of 1,672 were produced. And since all things special BMW are highly prized in today’s market, you can bet that when 2002 Turbos come to market, those in the know take notice.

So, how is this one a ‘Roll of the Dice’?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 BMW 2002 Turbo on eBay

Fail Friday: 2002 Mercedes-Benz CLK430 Cabriolet

Fail Friday: 2002 Mercedes-Benz CLK430 Cabriolet

Welcome back to ‘Fail Friday’! Today’s vehicle, well, you can probably tell how we got here. Wraps have become all the rage over the last few years and of course with the good, comes the bad. This is the very bad. It’s one thing to pick out a wrap that has the power to blind an entire row of traffic, but it’s another thing to apply it so poorly that you gave up and grabbed the spray paint. This CLK430 Cabriolet for sale in Florida (what a surprise!) was never anything special to begin with but that doesn’t mean you have to literally try your hardest to ruin it. Almost everything on the exterior of this car has been touched to make worse in one way or another. And don’t worry, the inside is as equally as bad!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Mercedes-Benz CLK430 Cabriolet on eBay

Year: 2002
Model: CLK430 Cabiolet
Engine: 4.3 liter V8
Transmission: 5-speed automatic
Mileage: 60,549 mi
Price: Buy It Now $9,850

Good condition, normal wear and tear, Brand new tires, New Battery, Top works perfect, Windows and door locks work great, good brakes, I have all the original books, 1-keyfob remote, has spare tire and jack with tools, radio has code on display from dead battery and I am in touch with dealer to get code off radio asap.

Just wrapped Chrome Holographic by VVivid Vinyl, brand new 19″ wheels and tires, brand new custom GOLD Leather interior, Beautiful CLK430 convertible. Top is dark Blue and works great, 60k miles – just spent $7,000 on items listed to customize this car – you won’t find one like this!!!!!

I’ve been looking at this car the past two days and I’m still trying to figure out what happened.…

2002 BMW M3

2002 BMW M3

My dad’s E46 M3 was by far and away the best car he ever owned (though I guess that’s not saying much, since he mostly owned Fords). It was a convertible and, as a result, the chassis was somewhat compromised – the dash would shake at the slightest provocation from a pothole. Still, it was a great car, mostly because it was such a perfect all-rounder. It was fast, handled like a precision instrument and looked sufficiently aggressive without being too shouty. It was also very practical. If you took it down to the shops to pick up a pint of milk, and resisted the temptation to mash the throttle, it could be a very docile car to drive. But if you did open it up, the sound of that 3.2 liter straight six was pretty incredible. There’s nothing else I’ve heard that’s quite like it. It wasn’t a growl. It was a rasp, a sinister, menacing one. I hope that one day I’ll own one too.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 BMW M3 on eBay

2002 Audi S6 Avant

2002 Audi S6 Avant

Perspective is an interesting thing. Just a few days ago, I looked at an S6 4.2 Avant – a car that never came to the U.S.. It was certainly potent, with 285 stomping V8 horsepower. Even more potent was the Plus version linked in the article, with enough power to match rivals from Mercedes-Benz and BMW. But here in America, we bemoaned the lack of importation of these models; worse still, Audi’s U.S. lineup went decidedly soft following the discontinuation of the 20V turbocharged inline-5 S6 in 1995. Indeed, another S model wouldn’t appear here until 2000.

But only a half decade after the most potent S-car had launched out of quattro GmbH, Audi gave us a reason to celebrate. The S6 Avant returned to U.S. shores, and it was even more powerful than the Plus model had been. Now with 5V technology, the BBD 4.2 V8 cranked out 340 horsepower. Like the 4.2 sedan we just looked at, the flares were widened and door blades made the stance more aggressive. Special interior details abounded; sport seats and steering wheel (comfort seats were a no-cost option), Alcantara headliner, and carbon fiber trim let the driver know they were at the wheel of a special model. Audi’s signature Avus wheel design appeared in 17″, but uniquely 8″ wide and in lower offset than either the S8 or S4 models’ wheels. The 1BE sport suspension was 20mm lower and 30% stiffer than the standard models. And though it looked like the rest of the subdued, understated early 2000s lineup, the Avant scooted; 0-60 was gone in 6.5 seconds, the standing quarter mile in 14.5, and the S6 could pretty effortlessly brush against its electronically limited 155 mph top speed. Reviews and owners alike chime in with the same song: like the E39 M5, this is a car that does everything, and does everything well.…

Double Take: 2001 and 2002 BMW M5 Dinan S2s

Double Take: 2001 and 2002 BMW M5 Dinan S2s

“Dinan’s latest work of art, he has not only fixed a car that wasn’t broken but also sought to perfect a car that everyone considers to be as close to perfection as is humanly possible: the BMW M5”, Car and Driver wrote in 2002. Dinan had, at that point, already made a reputation for themselves as the premier BMW tuner in the United States to the point where they became offered straight from the dealer. Considering that’s just occurred for Alpina here, the endorsement of the level of engineering from the California firm was resounding. Yet that is in part because Dinan’s modifications are far from just slapping a badge and some wheels on a car and calling it done. Take, for example the M5 S2.

Dinan took what many considered to be a very highly developed 4.9 liter V8 in the S62 and went old-school to up the power; and up it a lot, he did. There was no supercharger or turbocharging here; revised intake and enlarged velocity stacks were met on the other end with tubular headers and a bespoke exhaust. Each throttle body’s bore was increased, too. These changes required a reflash of the computer, but were both lighter and more powerful. As in 76 horsepower more. That’s the best part of a 20% gain on a motor that many considered to be close to peak performance! Dinan further upgraded the suspension, brakes, wheels, and final drive, along with adding a lighter flywheel. As a result, the new S2 was, well, about 20% better than the already awesome M5. But that perfection cost, and it was more than a 20% increase. A lot more.

On top of the M5’s $73,400, if you wanted a fully spec’d out S2 you’d tack on $36,000 to the price. For that amount, you could have grabbed a nice 330Ci in addition to your standard M5!…

2002 Volkswagen Beetle Turbo S

2002 Volkswagen Beetle Turbo S

The New Beetle isn’t a car which often featured on these pages. In fact, I can only find three times since we’ve started this site that they’ve come up. Considering that we’ve written up about 1,200 M3s in that same time period, I guess our stance on the Golf-based image car is pretty clear. However, the bones of the New Beetle aren’t really all that bad; based on the Mk.4 chassis, there are plenty of parts available and they’re cheap to buy. They offer a pretty practical hatchback package with some additional style. And, in turbocharged 1.8T form, they even offered a sporty ride.

Introduced in 2002, the Turbo S turned that package up a notch with help from the GTI. Underneath, the AWP-code 1.8T was rated at 180 horsepower at 11.6 lbs of boost, and had matching 173 lb.ft of torque. The transversely-mounted power was channeled through the same 6-speed manual you’d find in VW’s hot hatch and no automatic was available. Volkswagen outfit these cars with standard stability control and loaded them up with Monsoon sound, sunroof, active aerodynamics, leather, aluminum trim, power accessories and keyless entry. They also got special white and black gauges inside and a more pronounced twin-tip exhaust, along with fog lights integrated into new bumper covers. To help manage the speed, Volkswagen’s 1BE lower and stiffer suspension package was fit, along with BBS-made “Delta X” 17″ wheels with 225-45-17 tires. The package was pricey, at nearly $24,000 in 2002 – a not unsubstantial amount, considering that money would get you into the much nicer chassis of the Passat in wagon form at the same time. Unlike the pastel-toned entry colors of the New Beetle, the Turbo S was only available in Black, Silver, Platinum or Red with a total of 5,000 produced. Volkswagen hoped that these sporty changes would re-character the model which had primarily appealed in only one sexual demographic.…

1974 BMW 2002 Turbo

1974 BMW 2002 Turbo

Porsche pioneered turbocharging for the mass market, right?

Well, wrong, as it turns out.

Certainly, when you think Germany, turbocharging, and 1970s, Porsche’s name is intrinsically linked with any associations therein. But it was BMW, not the Stuttgarters, who first brought turbocharging to the German public. Back in 1973, BMW’s fledgling Motorsport division breathed new life into the 2002 by force with the addition of a KKK turbocharger to the Kugelfish-injection M10. Little on the 2002tii motor went untouched, and the result was 170 horsepower and 181 lb.ft of torque. That’s a pittance in today’s numbers, but in 1973? It was pretty outrageous. Consider, for a moment, that the base Corvette at the same time had the L48 5.7 liter V8 cranking out 190 horsepower in a car that weighed the best part of two 2002s.

The Turbo came to market with a penchant for fuel and a high sticker price at a time when the world was on the verge of a oil crisis. Unsurprisingly, it wasn’t much of a market success, and only 1,672 were made for the 1974 and 1975 model years. There were only two colors (Chamonix White, and Polaris Silver Metallic like we see here) and they came fitted standard with 13″ steel wheels. This recipe would be the basis for some later, greater sleepers from BMW, including the M5:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1974 BMW 2002 Turbo on eBay