1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

As the model that brought the 911 into the future, the 3.2 Carrera is one of the most important models Porsche produced. Compelling arguments certainly could be made for its predecessor, the 911SC, as well, but either is an excellent choice. The 911s of the mid-70s were relatively disappointing. Redesigned with impact bumpers and engines choked by emissions equipment, there were definite questions to be asked about the direction of the car. The SC came along and breathed new life into the model, but Porsche still questioned the long-term viability of the car, viewing the 928 as its model for the future. As the SC neared the end of its model run the Porsche brass had either to commit to the 911 or invest in other models. Obviously, they committed to the car, the 3.2 Carrera was produced and the 911’s future was secure once again. These are fantastic cars that have seen a serious uptick in value over the past year and examples like the one we see here, a Guards Red 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet with only 26,529 miles, are becoming extremely hard to find. This comes from the last year of 3.2 Carrera production just as Porsche was introducing its new model: the fully redesigned 964. As the last of the classic 911s, these are sure to remain well loved and should make for excellent investments.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

If the car we see here is any indication, then we appear to have reached a point where short-hood naturally-aspirated air-cooled 911s are all trading for similar values. Among driver-quality cars there certainly is a standard rise in value as we move from the 911SC to the 993 but the gap between these two models has closed considerably. This is great news for some buyers because it enables a more expansive search among models, but the downside is that a “cheap” 911 no longer appears to exist. Overall, it’s surely a testament to the desirability of the air-cooled cars more generally. Here we have a Grand Prix White 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet, located around Houston, with 71,500 miles on it and an asking price of $37,500. The 993 was first shown in 1993 and carried over a refined version of the 964’s 3.6 liter flat-six mated to a 6-speed manual transmission. As the last of the air-cooled 911s the model always has been extremely popular and looks to forever remain the most powerful and refined air-cooled option Porsche will release.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

Über Rarität: 1999 Alpina B3 3.2 Cabriolet

When BMW upped its game in the E36 chassis with the introduction of the M3, specialty tuner Alpina answered with the B3 3.0 and later 3.2 in step with BMW. The successor of the slightly less powerful B6 model, the B3 kept many of the same improvements to the E36 chassis – unique stabilizers, springs and shocks, and larger brakes. Inside the B3 received the normal Alpina-style shift knob, steering wheel and seats, and in their typical style Alpina provided unique front and rear spoilers along with their own badging. Of course, the package was rounded out by some of the best looking wheels ever fitted to a BMW. While the B3 was down on power to the European M3 3.2, it wasn’t really much slower – again in typical Alpina fashion, the car was tuned to make the most of the power that was available rather than just provide a shockingly high output number. A reported 1,000 of these ultra-exclusive B3s were produced, with about 2/3rds of those being the earlier 3.0 model. With only 342 of the 3.2 produced, the pool is already very exclusive on these. Add a manual transmission when most are automatic, special order Dakar Yellow paint and a cabriolet model, and this is among the most exclusive Alpinas ever made.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1999 Alpina B3 3.2 Cabriolet on eBay

1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

In 1984, when the 911 Carrera debuted, you might forgive the layman for not realizing a new model had come. By all appearance, it didn’t seem like anything had changed, though a careful observer would note the now integrated fog lights. A very careful observer might also notice that the rear decklid was adorned with a Carrera badge. Porsche had resurrected the Carrera name for this new model, a change that has continued through today as every subsequent naturally-aspirated 911 has worn that same badge. The most significant change to the car also lay under that badge: the new higher compression 3.2 liter flat-six that brought with it both increased performance and also increased economy. The 911 Carrera would be the last of the classic 911 design and as such has been a favorite of many Porsche enthusiasts. They aren’t typically the great value that they once were and excellent examples tend to be snapped up quickly, both points serving as testimony to how enjoyable these great 911s remain even today. The car featured here is a 1984 Grand Prix White Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet, located in Santa Barbara, with just 40,979 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

1990 Porsche 944S2 Cabriolet

When it comes to Porsche exclusivity for your dollar, you would be hard pressed to find a better value than the 944S2 Cabriolet. Less than 2,000 examples made it stateside for one model year, 1990. As of late, values have been creeping up, following the trend of the front-engine, water-cooled set. Boxster a bit too mainstream for your tastes? Here’s a good way to stand out with this fully documented 944S2 Cabriolet for sale in Connecticut.

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Wednesday Wheels Roundup

Another week and another set of rare to see wheels. One of the things I love about doing this feature is that I come across wheels I had long forgotten or didn’t even know existed. Today there are some neat ones in here, such as the BBS RT700s pictured above that would really dress up a Mercedes or older Audi. There’s also a mega-rare J.A.Pearce wheels for early Porsche 911s, along with some great looking Hartge and Racing Dynamics wheels for BMWs. I also included a set of Fondmetal F1s – remember when they sponsored an Formula One team? Finally, there’s a set of one of my favorite Audi 4x108mm wheels – the optional sport wheels from the U.S. spec Cabriolet (they were also seen on some European sport models of the 90) that look spectacular and are very affordable.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: BBS RT 17×8 5×112 Wheels on eBay

1995 Mercedes-Benz E320 Cabriolet

It seemed to be it was easier to keep up with vehicle changes year on year, mainly because there were less models populating manufacturer portfolios. As much as a petrolhead as I am, I can’t keep up with all the new model variants cropping up. Many seem to be a mashup of existing models meant to exploit every little automotive niche that might exist. But in reality, they are just variations on a particular modular platform. I still look back longingly to the days when the Mercedes-Benz lineup consisted of mainly the C, E, S and SL classes. It was simpler times and cars like this final year W124 E320 Cabriolet contained much of the DNA that made these cars popular with the monied set. This example for sale in Denver is a one owner car, showing under 50,000 miles on the clock.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Mercedes-Benz E320 Cabriolet on eBay

1959 Mercedes-Benz 300d Cabriolet

The Type 300 was the top of the range for Mercedes-Benz in the 1950s, a symbol of what this company was capable of but few were able to afford in the years immediately after World War II. One of the most impressive models was the four-door cabriolet version, known to some as the “Adenauer.” This was due to the fact that it was the ride of choice for the first Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany, Konrad Adenauer. Towards the end of the production run, the 300d was revealed, sporting a detuned version of the fuel-injected inline-6 found in the 300SL sports car. This was a car for the rich and famous, a car that was on par with what Rolls Royce had to offer in its day. It would eventually be succeeded by the 600 Grosser Mercedes, which would carry the torch of the über Benz into the 1980s. This 300d is one of 65 ever produced and is currently on offer in Ohio.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1959 Mercedes-Benz 300d Cabriolet on eBay

1995 Porsche 968 Cabriolet – REVISIT

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The late production Porsche 968 Cabriolet we featured in mid August is back up for sale, having no takers last time around. Ever wanted to own the ultimate expression of the front-engine, four cylinder Porsche? Here’s your chance. Let our resident guru and fellow 968 Cabriolet owner, Pablo, walk you through the finer points.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 968 Cabriolet on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site August 16, 2014:

1987 Volkswagen Cabriolet Wolfsburg Edition with 28k miles

My love for the Mk1 Volkswagen body styles is well-documented, and it extends even to the little-sister Cabrio. Today’s has covered a shockingly-low 28k miles, mostly as an RV attendant. Top to wheels, it’s a gorgeous example of 80s Volkswagens. We’ve all had the convertible argument, and while many still frown upon them, the extra fun can’t be denied. My hierarchy may start with the GTI closely followed by the Caddy, but if a Cabriolet were going to be in the collection, a low-mileage Wolfsburg is about as good as you can get.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Volkswagen Cabriolet Wolfsburg Edition on eBay