1998 Porsche 911 Carrera S

The 1998 model year was the swan song for the 993 generation, along the air-cooled engine. For some reason, Porsche skipped on the 1998 911 Turbo for the US, so we were left the Targa, Cabriolet 2 and 4, Carrera 4S, and Carrera 2S to chose from for the last of the run. All models were wore the wider body shell, supposedly because Porsche had an abundance of them they needed to use before switching to 996 production. But “abundance” doesn’t necessarily mean there were a lot destined for North America. For the most desirable Carrera S, that meant 1,292 for North America. However, there was some funny math from Porsche on these. All of them were technically manufactured in 1997, but Porsche held some of the supply back and rolled them out as 1998 models. Today’s car was built in October 1997, so it would have been considered a 1998 model year anyway, but I’m guessing this was near the end of the run.

Now as we are well over 20 years-old on these C2S examples, demand for them is high. It is totally understandable. It’s the last air-cooled naturally aspirated, manual gear box, rear-wheel drive Porsche 911. They can even sell for Turbo money if the spec is right. The thing is, just because they are in demand, doesn’t mean you shell out the money simply because they exist. This car in Texas is a perfect example why.

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1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

Early Porsche 911 Turbos are a sight to behold. A raw and dangerous car if there ever was, which is a major plus for some, but also can be a turn off for those who have to provide for their families. No, I’m not talking about crashing and dying, but rather when it comes time to pull the engine and split the case for a rebuild. That will put you out on the street real quick if you don’t have the cash set aside. Generally, unless you are getting an absolute steal of a deal on buying one, this is not a car you want as a project. It is much cheaper and faster just to spend the money to buy a completed example and be done with it. If you want an early 3.0L Turbo Carrera model like this one up for sale in Texas, start looking. Just around 700 came to the US for the model year, and I’m willing to be much less survived given how many crashed or cut up for racing duty.

As you might of noticed, this is not your typical earth tone color 930. Although they did have some really great colors from the production line, Signal Green was not one of them, so a color change was required. Still, is it worth buying? Or maybe spend your piles of money elsewhere?

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2015 Porsche Cayman GTS

Last week’s 718 Cayman T was a good option at what I think is a great price, but maybe the turbocharged flat-four wasn’t enough grunt for the people who want to hear their Porsches when they drive them. The answer to that without selling out the $85,000 for the used 918 GT4? The GTS, of course. The GTS still packs a 3.4-liter flat-six with 340 horsepower and looks the part with a lowered suspension, the Sport Chrono package, sport exhaust, and some interior dressings. A run to 60 is in the low four second range and even less with the PDK gearbox, like this 2015 is equipped with. Worth the dough, or still going for 911 at this price range?

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2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe

Do not adjust your screen. That really is the factory color. What you are looking at is a 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo finished in Meridian Metallic, which Porsche calls a platinum metallic, but you can make your own call on it. Personally I think it almost looks pink or rose gold, but whatever you want to call it, it is a rare shade. Even better, this example has just under 21,000 miles. What’s the catch then? You know where I am going with this.

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1992 Porsche 968 Coupe

The 968 occupies a strange space in the Porsche world. Limited in production, good looking, well-built and with good chassis dynamics and performance, it should have all of the hallmarks of a collector car in today’s market. Many prominent automobile publications have bashed you over the head with that, too – it’s not just me banging on here. Petrolicious posts an article (the same one, usually…) seemingly every week about the Porsche 968 Club Sport, Hemmings has repeatedly said it’s the best of the breed, and Hagerty told you to get on board in 2018 and buy one. And when Bring a Trailer sold one in late 2017 at $36,250, it seemed 2018 was poised to be the year of exploding values on the 968.

But it wasn’t. Bring a Trailer has, so far to date, failed to present a match to that one-off. It’s not for lack of trying – quite a few have come up since, including a Club Sport, but they’re all below $30,000. For reference, they’re selling at about the same price as E30 325is – and I’d argue that they’re a lot nicer. So here we are in 2021, wondering exactly where the values on these cars will head. Today’s clean Guards Red coupe is priced right below that 2017 sale from BaT – so is it a deal?

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2021 Porsche 718 Cayman T

I’ve been harping on and on about the new Porsche 718 GT4 and for good reason, it is a really great car. I love it and if they ever dropped about $25,000 off the sticker price, I’d find a way to make that happen. I doubt that will ever be the case, so they just aren’t worth it to me yet. However, there is a really great option if you want a 718 to feel special without spending over $100,000 just to get in the door. The 718 Cayman T. The best part? It starts at $69,000. Nice.

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2002 Porsche 911 Turbo

The 996 Porsche 911 Turbo market seems to have a little something for everyone. If you want a sub-$40,000 example that you can drive and enjoy, there are plenty out there. Want a super-low mileage Turbo S? $90,000 will do it. Thanks to Porsche for cranking out a ton of these, a little over 22,000 to be exact. Compare that to just 6,200 993 Turbos, so chances are the 996 Turbo will be around for a while and maybe not at crazy prices. This 2002 up for sale in Miami has a few special touches, but seems to be on the higher end of the price range. Worth it?

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2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring

I wanted to swing back to the GT3 Touring market after seeing the example a few weeks ago get snapped up quick, along with a 1,000-mile example sell for way over sticker. Even with the 992 GT3 finally breaking cover as the worst secret ever, it is looking like the 991 GT3 Touring will be the one to have and to hold. Still, this is a gamble to pay over sticker price with the expectation that the price will always hold at that. Especially considering there is talk of a 992 GT3 Touring in 2023 with a traditional manual gearbox. Still, this is Miami Blue we are talking about. Worth rolling the dice?

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2014 Porsche 911 GT3

Last week’s 911 Turbo Cabriolet was a quick lesson on how not to sell a car. Today I wanted to have another refresher, but this time on how not to buy a car.

This 2014 Porsche 911 GT3 seems enticing enough. Sapphire Blue Metallic, 16,000 miles, and under $100,000. Clearly a catch here. Photos are average, and the seller says the there was a “minor bumper accident”. Well, that is unfortunate, but maybe it was just a parking lot accident? After all, these are expensive body parts and some damage could trigger some replacement parts. Oh how I wish that was the case with this one. Just wait until you see what “minor” really is.

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1973 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 RSR IROC

The year was 1973, and maverick racer Roger Penske had an idea. He commissioned Porsche to build him 15 identical 911 Carrera 3.0 RSRs, each one in a unique shade, and then created the International Race of Champions – IROC for short – comprised of F1, NASCAR, Can-Am, and IndyCar stars at their peak to come together in equal equipment and see just who was best. Four races were run in total between 73-74, with some of the biggest names in the history of motorsport competing wheel-to-wheel in the vividly-toned 911s. Names like Denny Hulme, Richard Petty, Peter Revson, and upstart Mark Donohue piloted against Formula 1 1972 champion Emerson Fittipaldi, who drove the Sahara Beige car you see here. This chassis went on to be raced and modified by a few subsequent owners, and was restored back to its original configuration in the mid 2000s. Now, it can be yours – for a price.

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