2014 Porsche 911 GT3

Would you believe me if I told you that the 991.1 Porsche 911 GT3 had an engine warranty for 10 years or 120,000 miles? Well, it’s true. In one of Porsche’s rare screw-ups (in addition to that whole IMS thing), the engines in the 991.1 GT3 had a metallurgical defect in certain batches of pivoting rocker arms in the valvetrain. This led to misfires at high RPMs and thus, very unhappy customers who spent $135,000 plus another $40,000 in options. If for some reason your engine does fail, Porsche will drop in a new updated engine, no questions asked. You can probably put two and two together and figure out why I am bringing this up. This 2014 up for sale in Colorado just happens to have a fresh updated engine installed in it with just 2,300 miles despite the car having almost 18,000 miles. Not only that, this car has something else that makes it probably the cheapest 991 GT3 out there for sale on the market right now. Let me explain:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2014 Porsche 911 GT3 on eBay

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1996 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Tiptronic

A little over a month ago I checked out a 964 Porsche 911 C2 in a great spec until you noticed it was equipped with the Tiptronic transmission. Nothing really wrong with that, but I felt like it shouldn’t be priced on the same level as the 5-speed cars given the what recent 964s are selling for. Would I kick it out of my garage? Of course not. Would it be my choice all dollars being equal? Of course not.

Building on that, I thought it would be interesting to take a look at the next generation 911 with the old slushbox, the 993. The transmission was exactly the same, a ZF box with four forward gears, as opposed to the standard 6-speed you get with the manual cars. Even worse, the Tiptronic was 55 pounds heavier. Even worse than that, it sucked up the power big time. A 0-60 time in a C2 with the 6-speed was around 5.3 seconds while the same car with the Tiptronic box was 6.2 seconds. Yes, not great. However, this 1996 C2 painted in the lovely Guards Red could be cheap enough for you to consider it, right?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Tiptronic on eBay

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2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

For some reason I’ve been really itching for a Porsche 911 of late. I’ve done all the scenarios in my head from a G-body all the way up to an early 997.1. Naturally the most cost effective way to get into a 911 is a 996.1, but given their less-than-beautiful looks and dreaded IMS issues that the internet compares to a same amount of severity as a tsunami, it might not be the most enjoyable car to buy. However, bump the budget up another $10,000 and you can slide right into 996 Turbo looks without 996 Turbo cost or of course, power. The C4S in my opinion is a great looking car given what you want to work with on the 996 body, and I love they went with a heckblende across the rear like generations past. Today’s car, a 2004 C4S up for sale in Washington state, is painted in the always nice Guards Red and even has a handful of nice little options on the inside.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S on eBay

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1982 Porsche 911SC

Do you want to own a 1973 Carrera RS but can’t swing the purchase price of $600,000? Well, I might have a solution to you. This 1982 Porsche 911SC has the same cool blue wheels, Carrera script, and duck tail deck lid. Thats about it really. In fact, that ’73 RS and this ’82 SC aren’t even the same body. Those cars were longhoods, and this SC naturally is an impact bumper. But still, blue wheels, Carrera script, and duck tail! This car even has blue seatbelts! Now before you get ready to call me crazy down in the comment section, what if I told you this car was $570,000 cheaper than the RS?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 911SC on eBay

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2018 Porsche 911 GT3

Last week I took a look at the new 992 Porsche 911 and while it surely is amazing, it is going to be quite pricey. Naturally I start wondering if I’d rather has a mildly optioned 992 C4S or a 991.2 GT3 or GT3 Touring. I think both cars I going to fall somewhere in that $175,000 range and while the new tech in the 992 sure is amazing, you’d hardly find anyone complaining about what is inside a 991.2. Naturally, I started taking a look around what what 991.2 GT3s were out on the market and ran across today’s car. This 2018 GT3 up for sale in Boise, Idaho of all places has just 2,000 miles and is optioned with the rare 6-speed manual. Not to mention it is painted in the always popular Chalk. Who needs new cars, right?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 on eBay

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2019 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

The new 992 Porsche 911 is starting to trickle into dealers and this past weekend I went to check it out. The local dealer had exactly one, a 2020 911 C4S, that was a demo car until the actual dealer stock arrived in a few weeks and I have to say, I was impressed. It’s no mistake that it is a 911 and looking at it, you’d maybe confuse it with a 991.2. Well, maybe until you got around back. The single lightbar will take some getting used to and the odd little third brake light was clever, but I think a bit repetitive. When the rear wing moves up, it also carries a brake light. However, that doesn’t “count” for regulations standards as the 3rd brake light has to be on a stationary body part. (You’ll see what I mean in the photo after the jump.) The interior was wonderful outside of the little shift knob that people have been griping about since it was introduced and I can see why. It is downright dainty compared to the hunk of the knob in the 991 cars and I don’t even believe you can shift the PDK with it. The old school center analog tach is a cool feature and I’m glad they didn’t go all digital with the dash like most of the cars in the price range. So everything was going swimmingly until he told me the price.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2019 Porsche 911 C4S on eBay

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2010 Porsche Cayenne S Transsyberia

In one of the more bizarre models in Porsche history, we have the Cayenne S Transsyberia. What the heck is it? The Transsyberia Rally was known as a “raid rally” that ran from 2007-2009 that started in Moscow and ended in Mongolia. No big deal, right? Well considering you had to drive through Ural and Altai mountains, the Mongolian plains, the Gobi Desert, and whatever else Siberia could offer up it wasn’t so easy. The route was roughly 4,500 miles long and needless to say not every vehicle that started ended up finishing. Some stages we so dangerous they would just end up getting cancelled all together. Porsche offered assistance with a handful of Cayennes – 25 of 34 registered teams drove them to be exact – all being slightly modified production vehicles. After realizing that this marketing event really didn’t appeal to anyone, Porsche pulled the plug on factory support.

However, someone sitting in a cubical in Stuttgart came up with the brilliant idea to slap a few stickers and extra paint on some Cayennes and call it the “Transsyberia Edition”. Thankfully it wasn’t just some cosmetics, it did feature the 410 horsepower engine from the GTS and some extra skid plates for all the gravel parking lots at the soccer fields. Porsche made 600 of these in total, with 102 coming to North America. Four colors were offered, black with orange accents, silver with orange accents, black with grey highlights, and grey with silver highlights. Today’s example up for sale in Alabama of all places, is the least offensive of the colors offered: grey with silver highlights.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2010 Porsche Cayenne S Transsyberia on eBay

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2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS

Did you love last weeks Porsche 911 GT3 Touring painted in Brewster Green but maybe thought to yourself, “I need more excitement?” Well, don’t worry, because Porsche can fix that for you. This is a 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS painted in, you guessed it, Brewster Green. What exactly is it? A 3.8 liter twin-turbocharged flat-6 delivering 700 hp sent to the rear wheels via Porsche‚Äôs 7-speed PDK transmission. Compared to a Turbo S, it is 286 pounds lighter. This car has the $18,000 Weissach package which means you lose another 40 pounds thanks to a bunch of carbon fiber. Also, don’t forget the $13,000 magnesium wheels. The 0-60 time? 2.6 seconds. Quarter mile? 10.3 seconds. Can you drive it work on Monday morning? Yes. Will all of your co-workers hate you with envy? Also yes.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS on Rennlist

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1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Tiptronic

During my many miles of walking I do during the week, I run through a lot of hypothetical car purchasing situations. One of those recently was “how much of a discount would you need to buy and own a (pre-PDK) automatic 911?” While certainly not the most common 911s, there are a handful of these traditional automatic gearboxes on the 964, 993, and 996. The 964 and 993 had a 4-speed, while the 996 gained an extra 5th gear. All featured “Tiptronic”, a term Porsche coined and owns, that allows you to select what gear you wanted to be in within some limitations. Most often people who bought these automatic gearboxes were those with a physical limitation who couldn’t drive 3-pedals or the old saying of “so my significant other can drive it too” when in reality that maybe happens twice a year and one of those times is driving it from the garage to the street because the driveway was getting resealed.

Naturally these cars didn’t just go off and disappear because they still have a ton of value, but you’d be kidding if you think all things being equal they would be priced the same as a manual gearbox car. Yes, the look, sound, and feel of an aircooled 911 is still there, but these older ZF gearboxes suck up the power and you notice it. That is exactly what is going on with today’s car, a 1991 C2. This has all the ingredients for a perfect 964. Amethyst Metallic paint, Speedline wheels, and just under 73,000 miles. Problem is, it has the automatic gearbox. Is the price discount enough to make you overlook that?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Tiptronic on eBay

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1986 Porsche 944 Turbo

I’m a sucker for two things: great deals on underdog cars and crazy color combination. Welcome to today’s 951!

I’m not going to hide my love of the transaxle 4-cylinder Porsches. I think they’re still some of the best deals going in the Porsche world, provided you know where to look. For example, I provided you with a stellar example of a 924S just a few weeks ago:

1987 Porsche 924S with 17,500 Miles

As I mentioned there were two ways to consider that car. On one hand, I don’t think you could get a better condition, lower mileage Porsche for any less. But on the flip side, there were plenty of other cars that were a lot more desirable for similar money. This 944 Turbo is one of the cars that I referenced. Granted, it’s not quite as pristine as the 924S was, but I still think it has a lot to offer:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 944 Turbo on eBay

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