1974 Mercedes 280S Custom Crazy Hearse

This car is from down under in more ways then one. It hails from Australia, but there also is quite a lot of under world connections with this beast.

From the description it looks like this started life off as a proper hearse, but a new owner has gone all out with custom work to turn it into a head turner. Fancy mural work all over, neon lighting, big subwoofer, full size casket with skeleton, this thing has some fun possibilities.

With the under hood work being a fairly standard Mercedes 2.8 liter 6 cylinder maintenance to keep it running shouldn’t be too “scary,” despite having covered 128,000 miles.

The ask price is just under $13,000 U.S.

Spooky awesome. Just in time for Halloween!!

1974 Mercedes 280S Custom Crazy Hearse

~Evan

2-Owner, Low-Mile 1974 Audi 100LS for sale

We come to this site, be it to read, write, or just ogle, because we share an affinity for something different.  That something different is German autos, unique in their attention to detail, unrivaled engineering, and strong (if restrained) styling themes.  Today we’ve got an important piece of German-car history that embodies these identifying elements, albeit one that I was heretofore unaware of.  Volkswagen bought Auto Union from Mercedes in 1965 with a main motivation being expanding production capacity for the Beetle.  Audi’s weak lineup led VW to place a moratorium on new model development, a command that was quickly disregarded by a top engineer.  He developed the Audi 100 on his own with VW only seeing it as a completed prototype.  It was good enough that they approved and released the 100 to significant commercial success.

This Audi 100LS has only had two owners over its 36 years and has covered just 50k miles.  It is thankfully not a garage queen, more a well-respected classic that’s not afraid to be used.  The look seems familiar at first but unique upon closer inspection, at first referencing recent Mercedes roots with the greenhouse and chrome trim followed by hints of Fiat in the tapered ends.  Engineering, design, and just the off-the-beaten-path nature differentiates it from more popular cars of the era and separates our tastes from the “standard” car guy or girl.

A testament:

This is a car that can be purchased and then driven with no issues. We drove it 5 hours to Waterfest some years ago, with no problems whatsoever and I would not hesitate to drive longer distances than that. Being an old car, there will always be things to tinker with if the owner chooses, but this is a turnkey, drive away toy- ready for cruising this summer. The mileage is accurate and I drove about a thousand miles each year.

The listing is worth reading if you’re interested in the car as it gives the impression that this has been a well-loved, well taken care of example of the first Audi under VW ownership.  It’s clean enough to show off yet not so perfect that it should be tucked away (no car should be, really), and sound enough to drive whenever you like.  The buy-it-now of $6,500 seems perfectly reasonable for someone out there like us who appreciates that which only German cars can provide.

-NR

1974 Porsche Carrera RSR 3.0

In the spirit of this weekend’s edition of the 24 Hours of Lemans here is a car that competed on the track. I suspect our lack of posts this weekend may have something to do with us staying up for the past 24+ hours enjoying a pretty entertaining Lemans.

This RSR has been up for sale a few places this year and has been listed a few times on eBay. The seller lists the car as having competed at Lemans, Daytona, Sebring, and more and it comes with FIA papers and history.
An original factory genuine RSR with race history is not going to go cheap. With a day left bidding is up to $260,000 with the reserve not being met. I saw the car listed in Hemmings for $600,000, on the dealer’s website for $595,000, and previously on eBay bid up to $500,100 ending with the reserve not met.

This would be a super car for major vintage racing events. Not for the faint hearted or slim walleted individual. The car could go to a museum, but deserves to be somewhere where it can see track time.

~Evan

Beautiful 1974 BMW 2002 Turbo for sale

For around $45,000, you could buy a brand-new BMW 335i with it’s fancy twin-turbo inline-6, iDrive, and plenty of plush amenities and Bangleness.  You could also buy a very low-mile 1974 2002 Turbo, with a 2.0-liter turbocharged engine, some gauges, a steering wheel, and some nasty (in the good way) fender flares  and spoilers.  Which would you go for?  I know my answer.

We can all agree that the 2002 is an amazing car that forever changed what a sedan could be, but the 2002 Turbo is just in a different league.  Reasons it stands alone: 170hp; 5-speed dogleg; limited-slip diff; M Stripes.  I also love the tall greenhouse on the squat body, the center exhaust, and the all-business yet inviting interior.  This beautiful 2002 was originally owned by a Japanese F1 driver and painted black then later brought to the US and redone in the appropriate Polaris Silver with lots of OEM refurbishing.  I’ve seen these in black, and it’s something special, but this original hue is gorgeous.  Though unverified, it looks like it’s covered a scant 17,000 miles.  Much time and money has gone into making this a fantastic example, just one of 1672, of the awesome Turbo.  I don’t know the market for such a time piece and will admit that $45k is a lot, but it’s a lovely, rare BMW, one that laid the groundwork for all of BMW’s souped-up sports sedans to follow.

-NR

Mid-Year Madness – 1974 911 Carrera

It’s been said recently that the mid-year 911s (1974-77) will be the next generation of Porsche’s venerable air-cooled masterpiece to really take off in value.  By the look of things this very attractive 1974 Carrera is leading the charge!

1974 Porsche 911 Carrera For Sale

Model year 1974 rang in many changes for the 911, some well-received, some not so much.  The so-called “impact bumper” made its first appearance that year, replacing the more delicate chrome bumpers worn by all previous 911s.  Conformity with US crash impact standards required the beefier bumpers, but Porsche master stylist Tony Lapine designed an elegant and attractive solution.  Out back, engine capacity was increased from 2.4l to 2.7l in three levels of tune – base 911 with 150bhp and 173lbs/ft torque, 911S (175bhp/174 lbs/ft) and Carrera (210bhp).  Unfortunately for Americans the Carrera powerplant (from the famous 1973 Carrera RS) was still not approved for US emissions standards so US Carreras sported the “S” engine.

The car on auction is a “Carrera” albeit with some tasty upgrades, most notably the very desirable sports seats.  The transmission is the usual 5-speed, with lower ratios.  This may be good or bad, depending on your proposed use for the car.  Maybe not so great for highway cruising, but nice around town and at the track with added low-end grunt.  This car looks great in Grand Prix White with the buerzel (ducktail) spoiler and Ruf-style front valance.  The only thing I’m not feeling is the wheels – they need black centers pronto.

Seller reports he is a long-term (15 years) owner of the car, and that various upgrades have been performed.  The most important of these addresses the infamous “camchain tensioner” issue.  While the standard upgrade is to change to “Carrera” (i.e. 1984 model year) tensioners, the seller states that the tensioners have been “rebuilt”… further querying required on this.  Also, what’s up with the speaker enclosure on the back deck combined with radio delete??

Mid-year 911s have long been the poor relations in the collector Porsche family.  While “longhoods” (1964-73.5) and especially short-wheelbase (1964-68) cars have skyrocketed in value of late, the 1974-77 models have lagged.  Whether the reason was their (marginally) poorer performance, slightly increased weight, impact-bumper styling, or poor engine reliablity (especially on 1975-77 “thermal reactor” cars) the middies just haven’t taken off in value.  Recent trends, however, seem to indicate that this may change.  As longhood values grow out of reach for many, the relatively lightweight middies with their narrow-body vintage appeal are becoming more and more attractive, and this demand will drive prices upwards.  The particular car on auction certainly seems to bear out this trend.

-Dallas