1991 Audi Coupe Quattro with 17,000 Miles

For me, it’s been a week of some unappreciated cars, and the Audi Coupe Quattro ranks up there as one of the most unappreciated Audis. But unlike the wild turbocharged wonders that were available in the rest of the world, the U.S. market received only the 7A inline-5 20 valve motor. Basically, it was a 16V Volkswagen motor with one more cylinder; with a 7,200 rpm redline, the sonorous 5-pot put out a respectable 164 horsepower. That wasn’t much less than the E30 M3 had and matched U.S. bound turbocharged Quattros – but the power delivery was such that the car didn’t feel fast off the line, and the weight didn’t help. The B3 was hefty, saddled with improved safety options like PROCON-10, anti-lock brakes and a stronger platform, it was also decidedly more luxury oriented with electric seats, sunroof, windows, air conditioning and even an electronic lock for the differential in the rear. It was the 1980s Audis all grown up, but the impression left in many enthusiast’s mouths was that it was a bit soft and a bit slow. Ironically, the 7A even gained a bad reputation amongst enthusiasts as an underpowered unit that lacked torque – but a look at the original power numbers prove it was the most powerful of the non-turbo, non-V8 cars Audi offered at the time. 1992 would see a switch to the B4 platform with the V6 power unit and the end of B3 production; slow sales and a high price meant the Coupe Quattro was removed from the U.S. bound lineup after only a reported 1,500 made it here. Despite their perceived lack of sport, the legendarily stout Coupe Quattros served many of their owners well and many are still kicking around. Only one, though, is in the condition of today’s example:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi Coupe Quattro at Sutherland Auto Sales

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1991 Audi Coupe Quattro

The third generation Audi Coupe had big shoes to fill. The first generation 100 Coupe S, while not a big seller and not available in the U.S., is generally regarded as one of the more attractive German car designs in recent memory. Then there was the second generation Coupe, which in GT form was voted one of the best handling GT cars of the 1980s and was also an attractive design in its own right. But of course, both paled in comparison to the legendary Quattro, its impact celebrated universally now and rightfully afforded a place amongst the best and most influential cars in history. The replacement for these cars, then, had to be pretty special – and in many eyes, it just wasn’t – especially in U.S. form. Sure, the 20V normally aspirated engine was a great motor – but it was saddled with too much weight and the styling was rather bland compared to the fluid looks of the 100 and the angular awesomeness of the B2. Consequently and coupled with Audi’s image issues following the 60 minute debacle, not many of these Coupes sold in the U.S.. In spite of that, as there were with nearly every Audi model there was a devoted fan base that saw through the expensive pricing, the so-so performance and not particularly exciting styling to what was a quite competent highway car, capable of carrying a much better load than the cars it replaced with the new hatchback configuration, and as ever a snow machine. As these fell into second and third ownership, many turned towards the much more potent European versions for inspiration on how to correct the car that Audi sent to the U.S., and for good reason – the Euro versions were hands down better looking in either B3 or B4 version than what was sent here. Two decades on, the styling of this GT has aged pretty well compared to some of the contemporaries’ styling and these are handsome coupes overall. Today’s example is the last of the run for the U.S., but has been refreshed with Euro goodies and some paintwork that help it shrug off its many miles:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi Coupe Quattro on Quattroworld.com

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1986 Audi Coupe GT

Another week, another rare Audi from the same seller in the Pacific Northwest. This time, unlike the 4000 quattro that had been subjected to a series of questionable modifications, the Coupe GT featured today was well built between the late 1990s and early 2000s to compete in SCCA competition. Featuring most of the upgrades of the later 1987.5 “Special Build” GTs, this GT was a favorite of the 4000/GT crowd long before the current seller got his hands on it. Since those days of the original builder, not much appears to have changed except the deteriorating condition of the paint and the skyrocketing price:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Audi Coupe GT on Ebay

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