1982 BMW 635CSi Euro-Spec

Sellers of automobiles – specifically, most second hand dealers – always interest me. It seems that seldom they do the research to properly sell a vehicle. Perhaps when it comes to a brand new Kia, research just isn’t really necessary – but a 30 year old classic German car? Is some description better than no description? Sure, I guess at least there was an attempt made. But, if very little to none of the information actually applies to the model, I guess I’d err on the side of maybe it would just be better off with no description and just some pretty photos. At least in that case, I’d be annoyed that no effort was made to explain what I was looking at, but an effort made that misrepresents the product or just shows a lack of attention to detail? Now, that I find even more annoying. It’s much like plagiarism; I’d rather receive a poor quality essay on the right topic than an award winning lifted essay on the wrong topic. So, let’s look at this strangely portrayed E24:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 BMW 635CSi on eBay

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1983 BMW 635CSi Euro-spec

Perspective is an interesting thing. This came to mind when considering this E24 for several reasons. First off is how some people like certain perspectives of cars more than others. For me, the best angle of the E24 is the 3/4 rear shot, which accentuates the flowing roofline, the subtle drop in the trunk, and tucks the long hood in just slightly while not masking it. It makes the car look both elegant and aggressive. However, to this car’s seller, the best perspective is clearly the front as there are no less than seven pictures of the front of the car but effectively none of the side or rear that are at all meaningful. Now, perhaps that wouldn’t matter much to a perspective buyer of this European specification 1983 635CSi if the price were quite aggressively low. Instead, though, it is quite aggressively high, which brings me to my second point about perspective. That is, how much a car is worth is really a perspective of both the seller and the buyer. It would seem that amongst more rare models, the initial attempt at pricing generally seems like a Hail Mary – a hope that someone, somewhere will say “That’s the car that I want, regardless of price” and ante up. Obviously, what a car is worth to the seller in terms of either sweat equity or sentimental value does not necessarily equate to market value for a buyer except in rare occasions. So, let’s consider today’s 635CSi:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1983 BMW 635CSi on eBay

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Coupe Week: 1987 BMW 635CSi

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If there was one song that summed up the 1980s for me, it was Opportunities by the Pet Shop Boys. “I’ve got the brains, you’ve got the looks…let’s make lots of money.” Economic liberalism was on the move during this decade and as a result, consumers were hungry for vehicles to showcase their new found wealth. German vehicles would quickly become objects of desire, noted for their quality. The Porsche 911 wasn’t a new design by any means, but it would be the standard bearer for sports car excellence. The Mercedes-Benz S-class and SL roadster would be for the folks looking to capture a bit of that old money look and the pinnacle of luxury. Then we have the BMW E24 6 series. What about this coupe, then? I’ve always considered the 6 series the thinking man’s luxury car. It combined performance you’d expect from a Porsche with understated luxury you got in a Mercedes-Benz. It wasn’t the obvious choice, but time has been kind to the E24, as it is steadily becoming more and more popular with collectors. This 635CSi for sale in Vancouver, British Columbia is a US market car with just over 70,000 miles on the clock.

Click for details: 1987 BMW 635CSi on eBay

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Tuner Tuesday: 1982 BMW Observer Coupe

The 1980s saw a fair number of interesting and innovative ways to chop the tops off of what would otherwise be lovely coupes; the Carelli 928 and Treser Quattro Roadster are just but two examples that we’ve written up. But long before the Porsche 993 Targa introduced a large sliding glass roof, in 1982 BMW combined with the automotive modeling firm MGA and some backing from The Observer to create a quite unique expression of topless motoring. Think of it as a BMW 635CSi Targa if you’d like; but boy is it unique and well done compared to some other 1980s creations. It’s also on sale, if you have a spare $50,000:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 BMW Observer Coupe on 4 Star Classics

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E24 Face-Off: 630CSi vs. 633CSi vs. 635CSi

As the 2002we featured yesterday was getting ready to ride into the sunset, another two-door BMW chapter was just beginning: the E24 6 series. Today we’ll look at a trio of E24sm beginning with this early 630CSi for sale in Texas. While I generally am a fan of the later E24s, early models such as this one in a decidedly period metallic green have a strange way of drawing me in.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 BMW 630CSi on eBay

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U.S. or ROW? 1985 BMW 635CSi Euro-spec vs. U.S.-spec

I bang on about how much I prefer the look of the European market cars from the 1980s over the U.S. spec cars, and this is especially true amongst BMWs. For some reason, the powers that be at BMW decided to do the worst integration of DOT bumpers of all the European manufacturers; it was almost as if they said “Oh yeah? Well, take this, then!” Bulky, with too much plastic, rubber accordions and fading stainless trim, they stand out as a stark reminder of how simple and pretty the European bumpers on many of the same models were. However, it’s not often that we get to see two very similar models for sale at the same time; today, however, there are two nearly identical BMW 635CSis on eBay. Both are 1985, dark metallic colors, red leather, 5-speed manuals and updated wheels – and in their own way, each is lovely. Does the Euro-spec car win out for me once again?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 BMW 635CSi Euro-spec on eBay

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1979 BMW 635CSi Euro-Spec

As iconic designs go, the E24 has to rank pretty high on most German car enthusiasts’ lists. The lines are pure and classic – a long hood line with chiseled front end, delicate and subtle wheel arches, a sweeping greenhouse and a flowing trunk line. It just looks right – the front of the E9 that it succeeded was equally as classic, but I have always felt that the back of the 6 series was prettier than the car it replaced. It took elements of some classic BMW designs that preceded it and incorporated them flawlessly with updates for a new time. By 1970s standards, it was a very clean design – consider what was coming out of Detroit during this time period, and you’ll understand why the 6 still looked reasonably fresh a decade on in the 1980s. But for my money, the prettiest of the 6s are the early Euro cars, unencumbered by the DOT bumpers. Early on, though, the 6s suffered from not much performance – the engine lineup was effectively carried over from the previous E9 platform. That was solved in 1978 with the launch of the 218 horsepower 635CSi; a 5-speed transmission, deeper airdam and black rubber rear spoiler with model designation indicated the higher performance of this model. The 635 officially wouldn’t come to U.S. shores until much later in 1984 with the E28 updates in place, but for a time this was the highest performance BMW coupe you could get. Finding early examples that are still in prime shape is quite tough these days, but there’s a lovely example on Ebay today in Connecticut:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 BMW 635CSi on eBay

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Shark Attack: BMW 635CSi Roundup

In my recent write up of two pretty overpriced 318ti M-Sports, I suggested that a vintage 635CSi would probably be a better option if you were looking for a collectable BMW for around the same ask of those two models. To put my theoretical money where my unfortunately quite real mouth is, here’s a lineup of the venerable E24 grand tourers. For a modest price you get a tremendous amount of style, sport, near bulletproof engine and drive train and a potential investment. I have five examples to look at; interestingly, four of them are the last of the run, rare to see mid-88 and up refresh models. Also interesting though less surprising is that none of them sits on their original wheels. That, and their birthplace may be the only thing that links them though, as they’re all quite different. Which would be the one you’d choose? Let’s take a look at the oldest:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 BMW 635CSi on eBay

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1985 BMW 635CSi Euro-spec 5-Speed manual

Witness exhibit C in my anti-E30 M3 campaign. Like yesterday’s 1988 635CSi, this is another clean and tidy, well presented E24. But unlike yesterday’s end of the run car, this is a mid-year non-M spec car that I would generally consider the least appealing of the bunch. So what’s special about this one? Well, it’s a 5-speed car, always a plus amongst the big 6s. It’s got lower miles, too – only 68,000 in this case; that’s less than 2,500 on average if you’re counting. It’s all original, too – right down to the TRX wheels and tires. It has the unique Buffalo hide leather – an interior usually seen in the M cars but less frequently in normal production models. But in my mind I love it because it’s a Euro-spec car with a documented history, and an interesting one at that:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 BMW 635CSi Euro-spec 5-speed Manual on eBay

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1988 BMW 635CSi 5-speed manual

By 1988, BMW’s lineup consisted of a few dinosaurs from the 1970s which remarkably still were considered reasonably fresh and competitive in the market. First was the E28 5 series; a refresh itself of the earlier E12 design, most of the technology and the layout seemed fairly dated by 1988; if nothing else, certainly the bumpers hinted at a less than harmonious relationship between Paul Bracq and the United States DOT. The same could be said of the E24 6 series, now entering its 12th year of production. Granted, like the E28 it had received a host of updates in the early 1980s that kept in on top of the heap; for both platforms, the screaming S38 powerplant uttered the last roar in the U.S. for both legendary chassis. But unlike the E28, the E24 was granted one last stay of execution before the launch of the 8 series. With some light facial work, a nip and a tuck it suddenly looked like a much more modern car and in my mind the prettiest of the E24s outside of the original and unspoiled 630CS. Most of these last of the run 6’s seemed to be automatic, but a precious few were imported with a 5-speed manual – giving a sporty and less expensive alternative to those not needing the motivation of the M6. Today there is one such 635CSi for sale on Hemmings:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 BMW 635CSi on Hemmings Motor News

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