1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6 with 6,350 Miles

As I discussed in the ’91 911 Turbo post, while Porsche claimed that a fair amount (85%!) of the “new” Turbo was “new”, in reality it was an evolution of the ’89 Turbo wrapped in a smoother package. However, as our reader Howard pointed out in the comments, one very important change outside of the look was the suspension, which moved away from wooden carts the antiquated torsion bar setup to ‘modern’ coil springs. Coupled with the new limited-slip differential, anti-lock brakes and more sophisticated engine management (hence, smoother power delivery), the ’91 Turbo was a lot more livable in day-to-day situations.

Of course, that meant that it was possible to introduce even more power. Since the ’91 Turbo was a replacement for the defunct 965/969 V8 project, it made sense that Porsche hadn’t developed a new Turbo motor for the initial 964 Turbo launch. But for 1993, Porsche took the 964’s 3.6 liter and mated it with the turbocharger from the 3.3. The result was, of course, the Turbo 3.6. The extra displacement meant power was up 40 to 360 and torque 52 to 384 lb.ft, while both numbers were achieved lower in the rev range. To show off this new-found power, Porsche installed some fantastic Speedline-made Cup wheels and discrete “3.6” badging after the Turbo script. Despite the relative undercover looks, these are sought cars.

Today’s car is listed as one of the 288 Turbo 3.6s imported in ’94, and with a scant 6,350 miles on the odometer you know the price will be high. How high?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S 3.6 ‘Package’ on eBay

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1991 Porsche 911 Turbo

As the Turbo era died off in the early 90s and nearly everyone abandoned forced induction thanks to newer, more stringent fuel economy and emissions standards, Porsche’s ‘Gott verdammt, ve continue to do things the same vill!‘ attitude extended to boost. Instead of backing away from their somewhat flawed design, Porsche doubled down and launched a ‘brand new’ Turbo model of the 911 for 1991. I say ‘brand new’ because while the body looked modern and the interior updated, in reality this was the same old-school Porsche 911 Turbo underneath. It was still rear-drive only, still a single turbocharger with a ton of lag, and still capable of ripping your face off. Still displacing 3.3 liters, revisions to the intake, exhaust and ECU left the flat-6 churning 315 horsepower and 333 lb.ft of torque, the 964-era Turbo hit 60 in under 5 seconds if you threw caution to the wind and was within a breath of 170 flat-out. Outside, the 964’s smooth bumper covers replaced the impact-era units and 17″ Cup 1 wheels filled the flares, but squint and not much looked different from 15 years prior. Yet sure enough, newfangled technologies had crept in: anti-lock brakes, airbags, power steering *gasp!* In many ways, though modern and certainly capable of hanging with the best cars of the day if not exceeding their performance, they felt a bit like a dinosaur unabashedly sticking its middle claw up towards progress and the future. It’s that attitude, reputation and look that today continues to drive the desirability of this model in the used market:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

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1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe

A Tahoe Blue Metallic 964 is a color I used to never see come up for sale and then suddenly it seemed common. Of course, by common I mean that I have come across and posted three different examples over the past 14 months so they aren’t really that common, but given that none seemed to exist before that you get the idea. Of the three I have posted two have been Turbos and one was a C4 Cabriolet. Were I looking for a 964 those really aren’t the models I’d be looking for. What I’d be looking for is the one we see here: a Carrera 2 Coupe. So for me that makes this one the best of the bunch.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe on eBay

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1992 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Targa

When speaking of regular 911s, i.e. not the various limited-production variants Porsche has released, the Targa always has been my favorite model and among the Targas the 964 is the one I like best. With the Targa, I like the slightly different profile the roll hoop provides and really like the versatility of the Targa top. The 964 gives us a little more modern performance and refinement relative to the 911SC and 3.2 Carrera that preceded it and it looks just a little bit better. The problem is we very rarely see them. There aren’t a ton of 964 Targas out there and many of those I do come across really don’t seem to be in great condition. Alas.

This one appears to be an exception: a Grand Prix White 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Targa with what the seller has listed as a Cream leather interior (perhaps Linen?) and 130,935 miles on it. We aren’t provided any details, but it looks in really nice condition given the mileage. It’s pretty pricey. That isn’t surprising with 964 Targas, especially the Carrera 2, but this one is pushing things a little bit. Nonetheless it’s still great to take a look at one of these.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Targa on eBay

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1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Leichtbau

The rarest of the rare. Of all of the various 911 models, the 964 pretty much leads the pack when it comes to the ultra-rare. I joke occasionally about the myriad configurations of modern 911s, which I think at this point has resulted in around 22 different model variants from which buyers can choose. There’s pretty much a variant to suit every possible need (though still no rear drive Targa, come on!). While we couldn’t really call the 964 similar it does seem to be the model where Porsche really began to see just how many different ways it could offer their flagship car. The other significant difference is that none of the current 911 models really is all that rare. There are a couple special editions that were produced in very low numbers, but those aren’t too much more than unique option packages producing cosmetic differences. Even the Turbo S Exclusive is limited to 500 and while that’s not a lot of cars it’s nothing compared to the car we have here.

This is a 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Leichtbau. According to Canepa, the sellers of this particular example, there were 22 total produced. I’ve seen that number listed elsewhere as only 20, but perhaps there were one or two additional special requests, which kind of sounds like what occurred with the one here. Like a lot of Porsche’s most extreme performance models the Carrera 4 Leichtbau wasn’t for sale in the US market. You’d almost never have a change to buy one. Here is one such chance.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Leichtbau at Canepa

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1992 Porsche 911 America Roadster

I have always found this to be one of the more peculiar 911 models. This is a Midnight Blue Metallic 1992 Porsche 911 America Roadster, located in Miami, with a Tan/Black leather interior and 73,368 miles on it. These are pretty rare – only 250 were produced – and this one looks in very nice shape. The price is pretty high, but given their rarity these do tend to have a high price attached.

So why do I find them peculiar? Well, maybe because I don’t really know why the model exists. Were buyers clamoring for a wide body Cabriolet? Was the 911 Speedster based off the 3.2 Carrera so successful that Porsche felt they needed to produce something similar for the 964 as well? I don’t know, though the Speedster would return in 1994 after America Roadster production ceased so perhaps there was some desire for one.

Regardless, these are pretty neat even if I’m not quite sure about their appeal. The idea was to build a more driver-focused Cabriolet in the spirit of the 356 Roadster, which had replaced the 356 Speedster. As the Roadster moniker suggests, the rear seats have been removed. The rear is wider and the America Roadster received the brakes and suspension from the Turbo. It’s basically a Turbo-look Cabriolet and given that the 964 Turbo only came in Coupe form the America Roadster was your only shot at getting a Cabriolet with the wider rear.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 America Roadster on eBay

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1992 Porsche 911 Turbo

Update 11/26/18: This Tahoe Blue Metallic 964 Turbo has dropped from the original $200,000 ask in September to $170,000 today.

I’m going to have a lot of questions about this 1992 Porsche 911 Turbo, but I’ll start with the one that struck me immediately and isn’t necessarily related to this particular Turbo. Are we now at a point where the 3.3-liter 964 Turbo is a $200K car? Assuming we’re not talking about some ultra-rare sub-5K mile example, of course. I’m really not sure we’re there yet, but this one seems set on trying to get us there. I will say, I have been seeing a lot more high prices among 964s in general so I’m beginning to wonder if that market is shifting upward for some reason. I have in many cases offered these Turbos as a relatively inexpensive alternative to the collector-sought 1989 930, but if prices are moving up then that idea may no longer work.

As for this one: it’s certainly a very good looking example and appears to be in very good condition. I think the exterior is Tahoe Blue Metallic, a relatively uncommon blue that Porsche offered in the early ’90s. We’ve seen it before, but not quite with this contrast in the interior. It’s certainly a rare example, but enough so to command this sort of price?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

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1993 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe

I never really know if I should post cars like these. The car itself I like a lot. It’s an Amethyst Metallic 1993 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe with matching interior and 40,500 miles on it. A low mileage, rare color, rear drive 964 is something I’m always on the lookout for. It’s got a few modifications – center exit exhaust from a 997 GT3, new headers, bronze/gold painted Cup wheels, upgraded suspension, and a couple other minor items – though the seller says most of the original parts come with the car. Overall it looks great. Not everyone will care for the choice in wheel color, but I think they contrast nicely with the Amethyst exterior. Regardless, wheels are easily changed.

That said, unless I’m missing something the price seems so out of line with the market that I’m not sure any serious buyer really will give it much consideration. Maybe the market changed while I wasn’t looking or maybe the seller has seen a few RoW cars with similar asking prices and figured this one should garner similar attention. I don’t know. Obviously, we can see where I landed on the decision of whether to post. I like this 911 enough and see them rarely enough that I thought it worth a closer look. But I’m not sure where we go after that.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe on eBay

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1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe

1989 was a pretty important year for Porsche. It served as both beginning and end. As the final production year of the 3.2 Carrera (and the 930) it marked the end of the classic 911. With that end came a new beginning with the almost entirely newly designed 964. Its looks still showed a clear relationship with the 911s that preceded it, but it was reportedly 85% new and its rounder lines were a clear evolution of the design. Its underpinnings were decidedly more modern and refined as well. It was an important year.

Porsche had done something a little strange though. When it debuted the 964 it chose to be doubly bold by making the model release an entirely new model altogether: the Carrera 4. So for all intents and purposes 1990 was the year things really got rolling. The Carrera 2, possessing the traditional rear-drive 911 layout, finally made its debut in Coupe, Targa, and Cabriolet form. Unless you really have a desire for all-wheel drive in a 911, or would like to use your Porsche for winter duty, the Carrera 2 probably is the 964 you should be seeking. The Turbo is great as well, though much more expensive.

So here’s a nice example from an early model year: a Forest Green Metallic 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe, located in Miami, with Tan interior and 101,162 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe on eBay

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1991 Porsche 911 Turbo

Update 8/2/18: This car listed as sold at $95,400

Here we have a Polar Silver Metallic 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo, located in Oregon, with Black interior and 73,940 miles on it. We don’t see the 964 Turbo come around for sale all that frequently, at least not compared with its longer lived predecessor the 930, but for whatever reason I’ve been seeing some nicer ones pop up for sale lately, one of which appears to have sold quite a bit more quickly than I’d have expected. There are a few up on eBay right now, including the very pretty and gradually becoming less expensive Coral Red Metallic example I posted a year ago, but I chose this one for a couple of reasons.

First, I think Polar Silver looks fantastic on the 964 in general and especially the 964 Turbo. Silver isn’t typically a color I prefer on most cars, but Polar Silver is an excellent variant of the color and it just works on the 964. I don’t know why, it just does. I also like that this one has a few modifications that should make it just that extra bit more fun to drive. Obviously, how much appeal that work has will vary by buyer, but fun is fun and more power generally is more fun. So why not?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

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