1997 Porsche 911 Cup 3.8 RSR

While for some the Turbo S and GT2s are the pinnacle of 993 performance and desirability for understandable reasons, for me it’s the Supercup cars that really excite. Building on the 964 Cup design, the 993 received a special version of the Carrera RS’s 3.8 liter M64/20. Dubbed the M64/70, a plastic intake, hotter cams, no cats and a unique non-MAF Motronic computer yielded 315 horsepower. Then, just as they had with the 964, Porsche upped the ante again with the 3.8 RSR. The RSR had an even more unique motor – the M65/75 – which went to a aluminum resonance manifold and individual throttle bodies and hot cams to produce 349 horsepower. You could opt for three different specifications for sprint or endurance, and two different transmission options (one with additional cooling). Outside, in addition to the Cup splitter and giant rear spoiler, the RSR featured GT2-esque tacked on flares covering massive 18″ BBS center-lock magnesium race wheels. It was, in all, a very special package and a claimed 45 were produced.

The thing is, this isn’t one of them. Well, sorta…

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Cup 3.8 RSR on eBay

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1996 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Tiptronic

A little over a month ago I checked out a 964 Porsche 911 C2 in a great spec until you noticed it was equipped with the Tiptronic transmission. Nothing really wrong with that, but I felt like it shouldn’t be priced on the same level as the 5-speed cars given the what recent 964s are selling for. Would I kick it out of my garage? Of course not. Would it be my choice all dollars being equal? Of course not.

Building on that, I thought it would be interesting to take a look at the next generation 911 with the old slushbox, the 993. The transmission was exactly the same, a ZF box with four forward gears, as opposed to the standard 6-speed you get with the manual cars. Even worse, the Tiptronic was 55 pounds heavier. Even worse than that, it sucked up the power big time. A 0-60 time in a C2 with the 6-speed was around 5.3 seconds while the same car with the Tiptronic box was 6.2 seconds. Yes, not great. However, this 1996 C2 painted in the lovely Guards Red could be cheap enough for you to consider it, right?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Tiptronic on eBay

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Almost S: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo X50 Sonderwunsch/Exclusive

As they had with the 964 Turbo, Porsche continued the ultra-exclusive Turbo S package on the actually new 993 Turbo. With 430 horsepower pumped through two turbos to all four wheels, these were not as outrageous as the GT2, but plenty fast and luxurious to make up for it. Big yellow Brembos, a revised aerokit and flank vents that were a nod to the prior generation all helped to distinguish these cars. And with only 345 produced originally, from the get-go these were big dollar collectables. Of course, Porsche made a splash recently when it made a special brand-new one-off 993 Turbo S, ultimately selling it for a touch over $3,100,000.

So I’ll introduce this post by saying that this car is not one of the original Turbo S models. However, if anything, it’s a bit more interesting and even more exclusive. This car started life as a normal 993 Turbo, but was sent through the Porsche Special Wishes/Exclusive department (production coincided with rebranding of the Special Wishes Department to Porsche Exclusive) and given the bulk of the Turbo S details with a few GT2 bits thrown in for good measure. Further, it was then draped in a Paint To Sample color, Ocean Blue Metallic. The main difference between this car and a S is the rear spoiler and badges, which remained standard 993 Turbo items. In many ways, this car is the spiritual successor to the 911 Turbo S 3.6 ‘Package’ I just looked at, and it’s equally exclusive at a claimed one of two produced:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo X50 on eBay

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Wednesday Wheels Roundup

Welcome back to Wednesday Wheel Roundup. Today, I wanted to check out a few sets of wheels that differ quite a lot in size and taste. First up are a set of 19” Mercedes-Benz Monoblock wheels. They are a 19×8.5 and 19x.9.5 that let you run some really wide tires if that is the look you are going for. These are seen as the ultimate wheels for the W140 or the R129. Next are another set of 19″ wheels but this time from Brabus, followed by a hard-to-find set of BMW Style 38s. These 3-spokes are now back in style thanks to the resurgence of everything 80s and 90s now. Speaking of, Carter tracked down a few sets of DP Motorsports wheels following up on yesterday’s DP935. Carter also threw in one of his favorite 911 wheel designs – the Speedlines from the 993 Targa. The last two sets are great options for the cars who want to upgrade from their stock 14″ wheels into a 15” set, but keep the OEM look. A very clean set of ATS wheels that look identical to the factory 14” Bundts open up an entirely new world of tire choices and if you want to keep your hubcaps, a set of 15″ steelies with the ultra-rare 15″ hubcaps that were on the W100 600 and some ambulances in Europe.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Mercedes-Benz 19″ Monoblock Wheels on eBay

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1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S

Here we have another 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S. The final climax of the air-cooled 911 and quite rare. This one is not a ridiculously low-mileage garage queen like the last Turbo S I featured. While it’s hard to call any twenty-year-old 911 reasonably priced at almost $300K that’s pretty much exactly what we have with this one. Of course, there are reasons for that reasonableness. In this case, a touch over 80K miles and an engine rebuild account for the discount. Even so, is it worth it? It’s still around $100K more expensive than a low-mileage non-S 993TT and you likely could buy 2 of those if you allowed for comparable mileage and condition. Such is the cost of rarity.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

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1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

The 993 Cabriolet always has been, for me, a somewhat peculiar looking 911. The roundness of the 993 design begins to look a little overly squat once the roof is removed. There is a way in which all air-cooled 911s suffer from this phenomenon and there’s a fairly clear progression in squatness as we move from the 911SC/3.2 Carrera to the 964 and culminating with the 993.

So when I first began to look at this Iris Blue Metallic 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet those features seemed so exaggerated that even I was a little confused. It turns out that the aspect ratio of the pictures is off, but basically those pictures were confirming my usual perceptions of these 911s. Once I got the pictures into the correct aspect ratio the appearance came together much better and overall I like this Cab a good bit. Its colors are quite attractive and the condition looks quite good. The mileage is low at only 32,171 miles. The squatness is still there, but I think this is one of the better representatives of the model. If you’ve been looking for a 993 Cabriolet, then I think this one deserves a long look.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

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1996 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

This is a Turquoise Green Metallic 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe, located in Florida, with Cashmere Beige interior and 50,324 miles on it. It also has the factory Aerokit. The paint code is 25D, which I mention because there are a few colors that went with some version of Turquoise during the ’90s and in some cases they can be dramatically different colors while in others very similar. Turquoise Blue (code 3AR/3AS) is a phenomenal non-metallic blue and one of my favorites from the period. It has some of the brightness of Riviera Blue, though in a darker hue. It’s great. I believe there also was an earlier version of Turquoise that was non-metallic and much closer to the blue of Turquoise Blue than the color we see here. Similar to this 993 is Turquoise Metallic (code 25C), which is a slight variation of this Turquoise Green. The German helps differentiate the two: Tuerkis Metallic vs Tuerkis Perlcolor. Add in the even more green Wimbledon Green Metallic and then we have nearly the whole spectrum for this one type of greenish blue exterior. Porsche certainly knows how to provide options. All you have to do is figure out which one you like best.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

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1997 Porsche 911 Turbo

I think this 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo comes under the heading of “never judge a book by its cover” because while it’s a very lovely car from the outside it is really all about the interior. That’s the part of this one that will have appeal relative to all of the other 993TTs on the market. It’s quite clearly special order. I’ll also be quite upfront and state that I don’t like the way it has all come together. However, I’m very happy that it exists. It shows us the type of things that Porsche has made possible over the years for its more intrepid customers so even if it isn’t what I would do it might give you some ideas. I also think it’s only a couple minor tweaks from looking quite good. Let’s take a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

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1997 Porsche 911 Carrera S

A black 911 isn’t always going to be the thing to draw our attention. After all, we see black 911s all the time. But when the color is covering one of the best looking 911s, then I think we have something. Here we have a 1997 Porsche 911 Carrera S, located in Brooklyn, with a reported 68,000 miles on it. The black exterior is contrasted with a beige interior. For some, and that includes me, that light and dark juxtaposition between exterior and interior is just about perfect. For others it doesn’t work. If you happen to be one of those in the former camp, then I think this one deserves a look. Like with any C2S the price is pretty high, but you are getting one of the best naturally-aspirated air-cooled 911s Porsche produced and certainly one of the most attractive overall designs.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Carrera S on eBay

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1997 Porsche 911 Turbo

Let’s see if we can figure out what we’ve got here. Despite its appearance this is not a 993 Turbo S. The rear vents in the quarter panels, the quad exhaust tips, and the yellow brake calipers all make it look the part, but it isn’t. It is an Ocean Blue Metallic 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo with a Black leather interior and 23K kilometers on it. It also just so happens to have been fitted with a number of Turbo S pieces. As noted, the mileage is given in kilometers and the speedometer shows km/h so this clearly was not originally a U.S. market 911. In which market did it originate? We aren’t told. It’s also not quite clear why the original buyer would order a standard Turbo and then effectively convert it to a Turbo S. Porsche doesn’t typically make it less expensive to “build your own” so to speak. Perhaps a Turbo S was not available or perhaps the owner just wanted something more unique because given that this one is claimed to be 1 of only 2 such Turbos to exist it’s quite a bit more rare than the already very rare and very desirable Turbo S.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

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