1998 Mercedes-Benz S600 7.0 AMG

I don’t think it is necessary to explain to those who understand.

That’s the only description from the selling dealer for today’s car. Granted, that was translated from Japanese, but it is the general gist of it. If you know you know, if you don’t, this isn’t the car for you. The iconic W140 Mercedes-Benz S600 punched out to 7.0 liters by AMG Japan and equipped with a bunch of other little special touches. In terms of 1990s sedans, this is up there. The price? Well, if you have to ask…

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Mercedes-Benz S600 7.0 AMG at Car Sensor

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2003 Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMG

One of these more overlooked Mercedes-AMG models since the turn of the millennium was the very short-lived C209 CLK55 AMG coupe. You might be wondering how a car that ran from the 2003 to 2005 model year can be short-lived, but looking at the production numbers you see how rare they really are. In 2003, they sold a reasonable 761 cars here. 2004? Down to 509. The final year of 2005? Only 247. Considering there were roughly 350 Mercedes-Benz dealers in the US at that time, you were lucky to see one. Even though they are rare, there is not exactly much demand for them as they suffer from the curse of the CLK-Class. That is a thing totally made up by me, but let me explain.

Despite the CLK-Class looking like an E-Class coupe and Mercedes wanting you to think that, it rides on the W203 C-Class platform. That means a lot of shared parts, which isn’t a good thing when talking about the W203. Naturally, the drivetrain of the 5.4-liter M113 V8 with the 722.6 five-speed automatic is a gem, but the interior is a real letdown on these cars with the cheap plastic on almost everything you touch. Still, for this amount of money, who is to complain?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2003 Mercedes-Benz CLK55 AMG on eBay

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Feature Listing: 2006 Mercedes-Benz S65 AMG

Bonkers.

That’s what the engineers at Mercedes-Benz went on the W220, apparently. They were not content with already have a very potent sedan in the supercharged S55 AMG (which featured the same supercharged M113 as yesterday’s E55 by the end of the run, but kicked up to 493 horsepower) or the ultra-luxurious S600 that had a 5.5 liter twin-turbocharged V12 that made the same horsepower as the S55 but even a bit more torque.

So, they combined them in 2005.

The result was the S65 AMG, which with the punched out M275-AMG 6.0 liter twin-turbocharged V12 produced a simply outlandish 604 horsepower and 738 lb.ft of torque. That was enough to propel this 5,000 pound sedan from 0-60 in 4.2 seconds. And while that sounds really quick (and IS really quick), that was not where the S65 excelled at accelerating. It was really on the fly that the numbers started to tumble as the speedometer rose; a quarter mile was dispatched in 12 seconds. No fancy launch program, no trick dual-clutch gearbox, not even really enough tire to transfer that power to the road despite the massive 275-35-19 treads in the rear. This was just pure, unadulterated Victorian-era power. The real number that stands out isn’t the top speed, because like all other sensible German sedans from the time period it was maxed at 155 m.p.h., but how quickly it got there: 21 seconds – 2.3 seconds ahead of a Ferrari 575. If you’re counting, that was about the same amount of time it took an early 1980s Volkswagen diesel to hit 60. And you were able to achieve this speed in what was effectively a modern Swiss chalet, comfortable, quiet and full of all the modern technical features you’d expect from the automotive equivalent of a Brookstone catalogue. But it was expensive, topping $180,000 before the few options you could select – yet today, these physics-defying super executives can be purchased by mere mortals:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2006 Mercedes-Benz S65 AMG on eBay

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