Motorsports Monday: 1988 Porsche 944S Firehawk

If you were a sports car racing enthusiast in the 1980s, Group C might have been the top of the heap but there was some great action in the Firehawk support series. Here was a category of cars you could actually go buy, in very close to their original specification. Looking back, they are the cars we often write up today – BMW M3s, Volkswagen GTis and Corrados competing against everything from Camaros and Firebirds to Honda CRXs and even the occasional Peugot 505. The names that raced the cars were just as famous – and some are still active. Jack Baldwin, for example, ran Camaros back then and I believe it getting ready for another run at the Pirelli World Challenge with his Porsche Cayman S in 2015. Names like Scott Sharp, Randy Pobst, Dorsey Schroder, Andy Pilgrim and even Paul Newman weren’t uncommon sights in 1988. But there were other notable race names from the 1980s; BMW fans would recognize David Hobbs, Ray Korman and TC Klein, for example, and for Porsche fans Dave White combined forces with Bob Akin. Both had extensive race history with Porsche, and they took some Porsche 944s with the paint still wet to Sebring in 1988:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 944S Firehawk on eBay

Continue reading

Motorsports Monday: 1990 Porsche 944S2 Firehawk – REVISIT

The 1990 Porsche 944S2 Firehawk series car that I wrote up back in early August is back on eBay, having failed to sell its first time around. The price has been lowered $2,000 this time, but it remains pricey by 944S2 and track car standards at $23,100. That amount does buy you a solid race car platform with an interesting history with the look of a Turbo Cup car, but I’d guess it’s still a bit too expensive for most people’s blood. If it could be had in the mid to high teens I’d think there would be more interested parties.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 944S2 Firehawk on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site August 4, 2014:

Continue reading

Motorsport Mondays: 1990 Porsche 944S2 Firehawk

In a recent discussion regarding why values of the E30 M3 had taken off while the Porsche 924/944/968 had remained affordable, one of the comments suggested that the reason was because the Porsches did not enjoy the race pedigree than the M3 did. While one can’t deny the success of the E30 M3 on track and even in rally venues, that answer belies the many races and different series that the 924 and 944 competed in. Indeed, the development of the 944 and 944 Turbo motors came about in part because specifically of the race programs. In everything from local SCCA races straight up to the big dogs at Le Mans, the Porsches were racing right beside some of their more famous 911, 935, 936, 956 and 962 brethren. On top of that, the factory also fronted 924 Carrera GTS cars in the World Rally Championship, many of those that were involved later to move to Audi’s program. Then there were the one-make 944 and 944 Turbo Cup races around the world. But into the late 1980s and early 1990s, one of the hottest contested, affordable race series in the U.S. was the “Firehawk” series put on by IMSA and the SCCA. One of the more competitive cars in those race series were the late 944S2 and 968 models, offering serious reliability, surprising speed and excellent balance to make a fantastic race car. One of the original 944S2 Firehawk cars is up for sale today:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 944S2 Firehawk on eBay

Continue reading

Motorsport Mondays: 1992 Porsche 968 Firehawk

Ever hear the story of George Washington’s famous axe that cut down the cherry tree? It’s something called Theseus’ Paradox, and it’s a question of whether an object remains original in the effort to preserve it. In the case of George Washington’s axe, both the head and handle had been replaced several times but it was still claimed to be “the axe” used by Washington. Occasionally we see such things with road cars, but much more often it appears with race cars, as is the case with today’s 968. These cars were intended to be raced, and they were – hard. Rubbing, bumps, bruises and crashes amongst race cars are fairly common – just look at the Formula One race from this past weekend – it seemed that nearly every corners one was banging into another. So, here was have a early 968 built for the Firehawk series, but then crashed heavily and re-tubbed. Is it still the same car?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 968 Firehawk on eBay

Continue reading

1993 Firehawk Porsche 968

We haven’t featured a race car at GCFSB since the summer, so it’s about time we start throwing more competition vehicles into the mix. Given that the holidays are upon us, I’m sure many of you are making a list and checking it twice. I’m not making a list myself, but there’s one list that I’m a fan of year round: Rennlist. The perfect place to scour for gift ideas for that special Porsche enthusaist in your life.

It might be a stretch for a gift, but this Porsche 968 for sale in New Jersey was a part of the IMSA Firestone Firehawk Endurance Championship, a race series limited to vehicles currently available in the showroom. Noted for their superb balance, the 968 was highly successful in this race series. This car, built in 1993, is not a recreation and has had a number of maintenance items addressed as of late.

1993 Firehawk Porsche 968 on Rennlist

Year: 1993
Make: Porsche
Model: 968
Mileage: 24,000
Color: Blue
Price: $32,000
Transmission Type: Manual – 6 speed

Selling an authentic 1993 Porsche Firehawk 968. I’ve owned since 2003 and have over $85,000 in receipts to indicate the level of detail in maintenance and enhancements since purchase. This car was built by Dave White in 1993 to compete in the IMSA Firestone supported Firehawk series. The cage has the original IMSA stickers still in place. This is not a replica Firehawk that you see at the track periodically.

Currently configured for PCA SP3 or F Stock. This car has been exquisitely maintained by Precision Motorsport Racing in Califon NJ since purchase in 2003. All fluids changed after every race weekend. Corner weighted and balanced at least 3 times per season to optimize dialing in of suspension. Have all the spec sheets. Wired for cool shirt and helmet and radio.

Outline of major work done

Within the last 3 years:

Complete engine rebuild by Michael Mount with the best of everything. Approximately 25 hours since the rebuild.
Guards LSD
Moton Club Sports – 600lb front / 250lb rear spring set up
Clutch
Starter
Alternator
Power steering rack and pump
Borla exhaust
Battery
Replaced Fab A-Arm pins
Solid suspension bushings throughout
New window net
Schroth belts
Updated fire system
Belts
18 inch Enkei wheels

Within the last year:

New front rotors and calipers
New rear rotors
New Master Cylinder
Front hubs (Racers Edge)
Rear axles
Control arm pin servicing
Polybronze bearings & rear spring plates

Competition cars are a bit more complex than street machines when it comes to placing a value on them. A lot of variables come into play, such as the series the car was raced in, how many races it won, who drove it, who built it…well, you get the idea. Just like a road car, though, provenance and history are everything. While an eye watering amount has been spent on maintenance, this is par for the course with race vehicles. They are much more needy and run through parts and wear items more rapidly than your daily driver.

Similar to customized hot rods, owners of competition vehicles usually take a loss when it comes time to sell. While it may not bring $32,000, I’d wager to say that someone might snap this 968 up for close to the asking price, as it would be tough to recreate this at this price. Being an original vehicle from this endurance race series makes for a great conversation piece in the pit lane, as well.

-Paul