2008 Porsche 911 Carrera S

Maybe just because you can, doesn’t mean you should. Porsche’s paint-to-sample and Exclusive options programs has given us some real gems over the year, but every once in a while we get some real odd balls. Today’s 2008 911 C2S is bordering on that. This 997.1 is finished in the same green as the GT3 RS which isn’t the worst thing ever, but it is what happens on the inside that takes it to the limit in my eyes. Wait until you see for yourself.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Porsche 911 Carrera S on eBay

Continue reading

2019 Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS

I have to hand it to Porsche, they really nailed it when it came to their GTS trim line on the 911. It slotted in perfectly between the S and GT cars for those buyers who wanted more, but didn’t want to pay GT prices or live with the harshness they can dish out. When they launched the 991.2 C4 GTS, it sure seemed like it was knocking on the door of the GT3. The new twin-turbo 3.0L with the PDK gearbox could whip it to 60 mph is just 3.3 seconds. That is just .1 second slower than the 991.1 GT3. Seems like a heck of a value at a $135,000 base price back when these were new. Even better, you could get it with the 7-speed manual gearbox. What isn’t to like?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2019 Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS on eBay

Continue reading

2006 Porsche 911 Carrera S

There is something really satisfying to me about a Porsche 911 in blue. I don’t think I’m the only one, as Porsche fans seem to go insane over any crazy that is in a bright shade of blue. So much so, they’ll gladly pay extra to spec them in Paint to Sample. As luck would have it, that is exactly what we have today with this 2006 Carrera S in Mexico Blue up for sale in Alabama. A first year 997 car, this one comes in with a heavy option list with a sticker price of over $108,000. Whats not to like, right? Well, it seems to have the same issue as the 993 I just looked at.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2006 Porsche 911 Carrera S on eBay

Continue reading

2018 Porsche 911 Turbo S

After last week’s adventures in Paint to Sample, where a surprising number of people actually liked the color combo, I thought I’d go a little bit more traditional. As far as sports car tradition goes, it really doesn’t get more classic than British Racing Green, although it’s on a German car. This 2018 Porsche 911 Turbo S is not only a street legal rocket ship that is capable getting to 60 mph in just 2.7 seconds and through the quarter-mile in 10.7 seconds, but also tame enough to be driven early single day. It also somehow manages to look like a 911, even though according to those numbers it has to be some kind of space rocket. What isn’t to love here?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 911 Turbo S on Rennlist

Continue reading

2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S

As fun and as much as I love paint to sample and exclusive options on Porsche 911s, there of course is the potential for those to go very wrong. A few months ago Carter looked at a 2003 911 Turbo that was fine on the outside with a Speed Yellow exterior, but you opened the door to a Nephrite Green full leather interior. I like Speed Yellow and I think Nephrite Green would be awesome compared to the standard black or grey leather, but I don’t think its awesome to combine the two. That leads me to today’s car that I happen to find on a whim, a 2005 911 Turbo S up for sale in Belgium.

This car is finished on the outside in paint to sample Linen, which is a gold and beige kind of color. Different, but not offensive. Inside, you have a Boxster Red leather interior with a healthy dose of aluminum-look trim everywhere. Why this color combo? I have no idea. Although I’m almost positive it had something to do with the car being delivered new to a customer in Muscat, Oman.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S at Fun Cars Belgium

Continue reading

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring

Last week I took a look at a paint-to-sample Porsche 911 that was finished in one of the wildest colors I’ve ever seen. There was no mistaking its flat out pink appearance and you weren’t fooling anyone if you tried to say it had a tint of red or purple in it. Today, I thought I’d check out another 911 in a paint-to-sample color, a 2018 GT3 Touring up for sale in Wisconsin. This color was the standard fee of what Porsche charges for custom colors of $12,830 only to have lots of other people decide they want to paint their GT3 this shade as well. What is this color? Viola Metallic. It is very much a silky looking purple that is very light unlike Ultra Violet. So while not off the charts crazy, still pretty wild. You in? If so, bring your checkbook.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring on eBay

Continue reading

1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 2

Oh Paint to Sample, you’ve really done it this time. What you are looking at is a 1990 Porsche 911 C2 painted in “Karminrot.” In English, that is “Carmine Red,” but you can see that this car is not red. Even more so, if you see that a Porsche is painted in Carmine Red, it will look like this. So what gives? Why is this car pink? During a point in 911 history, Karminrot was actually this color. I suppose somewhere along the line they came to their senses and decided that it doesn’t make a lot of sense to call a pink car “red,” as well as the fact that no one was actually buying this color. That likely leaves this 964 as possibly the only example finished in a color most associated with bubblegum.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 on eBay

Continue reading

2018 Porsche 911 GT3

Give me crazy options, or give me death!

That isn’t what Patrick Henry said during a speech he made to the Second Virginia Convention in 1775. It is however something I would say to a group of strangers on the internet when looking at Porsches. This 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 up for sale in Southern California isn’t your typical 991.2 GT3. I know saying a “typical 991.2 GT3” is a little bit of an oxymoron, but seeing the options on this car, you might understand what I mean. Not only is it finished in paint-to-sample Agate Gray, but the full bucket seats are finished in burgundy leather with hounds tooth inserts. It doesn’t stop there either.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 on eBay

Continue reading

1997 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

You can file this one under the “strange but true” category. This 1997 Porsche 911 C4S is finished in paint-to-sample yellow. However, this isn’t just any yellow. This is literally Ferrari yellow. It says “Ferrari” right on the door jam sticker. Ferrari’s name for the color is Giallo Modena because they are Italians, but Porsche calls this Ferrari-Gelb. (Literally Ferrari-Yellow) I would of loved to have heard the conversation in Stuttgart when the buyer asked for a paint to sample in a car literally from a competing brand. My guess is this was a very important person who spent a lot of money with Porsche over the years because Porsche doesn’t exactly bend over backwards for anyone off the street and they certainly don’t do it for less than those giant bags with ‘$‘ on the side of them. Given the paint to sample, you would be correct to guess this one also has some other cool little touches.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S at Klassik Sportwagen

Continue reading

Euro PTS: 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2

For some time, the 964 design was relegated to the “least favorite” column for many in the 911 world. Regarded as little more than a bridge between the classic 911 design of the 3.2 Carrera and the sophisticated modern beauty of the 993, appreciation for the clean lines and steadfast simplicity of the 964 has grown. It hasn’t hurt that the cars around it have rocketed up in value, either. So today let’s take a look at a prime example; a ROW 1991 911 Carrera 2 in Paint-to-Sample in Murano Green.

Unlike earlier cars, changes between the ROW 964s and North American cars were relatively minor (minus the special production cars, like the Carrera RS). Power from the 3.6 air-cooled flat-6 was effectively the same as its North American counterpart. The bumperettes were missing on ROW cars, and of course for Euro plates the center rear bumper section was slightly different. Without the 5 mph mandate, ROW cars didn’t have the heavier crash bars behind their bumpers either, nor do they have the collision bars in the doors. As you’d expect, the headlights and tailights are different, and Euro cars had sidelights that were missing on NA cars. Those headlights were adjustable in cockpit via an adjuster next to the key. Foglights were standard on ROW cars and they also had no third brakelight. ROW cars had larger fuel tanks, lower suspension, and a few other minor tweaks. Reading all of that would probably lead you to believe the ROW cars were lighter, and they are – somewhere around 50 lbs or so.

But here it’s not the missing 5-year-old’s weight you’re excited for – it’s just got to be the color:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 ROW PTS on eBay

Continue reading