1973 Porsche 911 RSR Clone

While they were cars primarily intended for racing, we do occasionally come across road-going 911 RSR clones for sale even though in some regards it can be difficult to determine what exactly gives it the distinction of being a RSR rather than a RS. Those sorts of technical details aside, a car built towards RSR specifications always will be an excellent performance machine combining light weight with excellent power and mating that thrust to a capably handling chassis. Surround that performance with the iconic design of a ’73 Carrera RS and you have a car that looks just as fantastic as it will drive. The car featured here, located in Illinois, began its life as a 1973 Porsche 911T before being converted to its current specifications. The engine is a built 3.2 liter flat-six mated to a 915 transmission. For the rest of the details on body and suspension, see below. I have no doubt that this would be a very lively car to drive!

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Year: 1973
Model: 911 RSR
Engine: 3.2 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 2 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Porsche 911 RSR Clone on EBay

1973 Porsche RSR clone

This is an actual 1973 non-sunroof 911T converted to an RSR – not a backdated impact bumper 911. the fenders, hood, bumpers, ducktail and doors are fiberglass. the rear turbo quarters/flares and roof are steel. I bought the car already converted to an RSR but the condition was poor so i invested considerable time and money into re-building the whole car. It weighs 2080lbs dry and has an estimated 275hp.

link to tons of pictures of the start, build and finished porsche:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/19319612@N07/sets/

below is a list of the components/work that has been done:

body:
media blasted to bare metal, epoxy primed and painted inside and out gulf blue. front fenders, doors, both bumpers, ducktail and hood are fiberglass. all seals replaced except quarter
window seals. all glass original to 1973. interior and engine compartment coated with ceramic heat insulating paint, bottom and wheel wells coated with 3M stone guard prior to paint. all suspension points re-enforced. most spot weld seams seam welded. interior has rs lightweight carpet, GTS seats and bolt in rsr style rollbar (not a full cage). dash is covered with same lightweight carpet. RS door panels. no radio, no heat. front oil lines routed through heater tubes. new headliner also. the minimal sound coatings work very well without adding much weight.

suspension:
aluminum rear arms, 935 spherical bearing spring plates. bilstein rsr valved shocks and 500lb coil springs. tarret swaybars. monoball rear bearings, all new wheel bearings. front has powdercoated A arms, elephant polybronze bearings. struts are bilstien rsr valved and spindles raised 15mm. tarret swaybar, 21mm torsions. rebuilt steering rack. Wheels are Lindsey racing 17×9.5 fr, 17×11 r weld-up fuchs with BBS barrels then powdercoated silver with black trim. tires are new.

brakes:
custom mounted wilwood superlite calipers over 12.2” x 1.25” rotors
rear is custom machined 993 calipers over stock turbo rear rotors.
all new flexable braided brake lines for whole car. new turbo master cylinder and re-built pedalbox.

engine:
3.2L short stroke built on SC case. 98mm 9.5:1 CR mahle pistons/cylinders. carrera oil pump, all new bearings, crank freshly polished and STD. case is shuffle pinned. carrera oil tensioners new oil cooler. ARP rod bolts and head studs. heads mildly ported and twin plugged. new valves/guides and seals. cams are DC62 – from dougerty racing. titanium retainers and new race springs. fresh rebuilt by performance oriented weber 46 carbs. european headers and muffler type megaphones (sound better than any porsche you have heard) all jet-hot coated grey. ignition is electromotive HPV twin-plug setup. a front oil cooler was added with aeroquip lines to the front.

transmission:
915 mag case with Wevo gate shift, guard torque sensing differential. shifter is Wevo also. all new syncronizers. powerhaus side plate with new bearings. swepco oil. lightweight flywheel, new clutch with aluminum pressure plate housing. new carrera half-shafts and CV joints.

electrical:
wire harness replaced with universal painless wire harness, only the wiper and turn signal stalks retain the porsche wiring. there is an O2 sensor and controller in the interior of the car – not mounted. no radio however electrical lines are there to power a radio. no antenna, defrost, fan and the wiper squirters are not connected.

basically everything is done on this car, however the final set-up still needs to be done. the carbs and ignition need to be adjusted. the car needs an alignment also, steering wheel is not centered. some of the fuel line routing is not great around the engine but it all works. there are 2 tiny oil drips – one is the right chain cover and the other is the lower left valve cover.

I have way more in this car than i will get for it, I am not in the business of flipping/restoring cars. This was a personal project that took too long and way too much money to complete. I am not desperate to sell. I will answer any and all questions the best i can. I have the title in hand as well as a ton of receipts. The mileage listed is not real – this car is a fresh restoration that has not been road registered. I will help as much as i can to assist in shipping.

Your bid constitutes a legally binding contract to purchase this vehicle. Please do not bid if you’re not seriously interested or financially able to purchase this vehicle. Please read eBay’s “User Agreement”.
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Please read eBay’s “Retracting a Bid”. If you place a bid before the last 12-hour period of the auction, you may retract the bid before the last 12-hour period only for exceptional circumstances. You will not be allowed to retract that bid during the last 12-hour period of the auction. If you place a bid during the last 12-hour period of the auction, you will be allowed to retract the bid for exceptional circumstances only if you do so within one hour after placing the bid.
Notice to Bidders:
I reserve the right to cancel all bids and end the auction early should the vehicle no longer be available for sale.
Buyer’s Inspection
If you plan to have a Buyer’s Inspection, please make sure you have the vehicle inspected prior to the end of the auction. Organizing an inspection must be at my conveinence – i work full time and cannot be available any time. Inspection fees, if any, are the “Buyer’s” sole responsibility.
Warranty
This vehicle is being sold “as is”.
Payments
I accept Certified and Cashiers Checks and Funding Transfers in $US only. All funding or paperwork must be received as soon as possible and prior to picking up the car or I reserve the right to re-list or sell to any other qualified buyer. Winning Bidder must confirm his winning bid with a $1,000 NON-Refundable Deposit within 48 hours of auction end (this can be done through paypal). Balance of Purchase Price is due to Seller prior to picking up the car. I will not accept Paypal for the balance due to the extra fees paypal charges. if you want to pay the fee in addition to the auction bid that is fine.
Taxes and Fees
“Buyer” is responsible not only for knowing their own states’ laws regarding taxes and fees, but also remitting the proper taxes, fees, and documents for their state.
Title Information
I have the title in hand, will send separately signed to the buyer.
Shipping and Delivery
All shipping charges are the “Buyer’s” responsibility. I will help with shipping arrangements but will not be responsible in any way for claims arising from shipping damage! I assume no responsibility for damages incurred after the vehicle leaves my garage. All shipping arrangements provided by me are strictly a courtesy. I are not affiliated with any carrier. Any claims or other communication regarding shipment of vehicles will be between you and the “Carrier” and not with me. The amount of time it takes for delivery depends upon the “Carrier” selected. Verify with the “Carrier” for an Estimated Time of Arrival to be sure. In the event the vehicle arrives and is not to the satisfaction of the buyer I am under no obligation to offer a return or credit.

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The ’73 RS Replica I featured in a previous post, which sold for $37,000, shares a few similarities in the execution and build and might give us a ballpark figure to assess a potential selling price for this car. This RSR Clone comes in with a lighter weight and with the 3.2 liter engine produces more horsepower. It was also built from an original long-hood 911 rather than a back-dated example with impact bumpers. How much that last detail especially might nudge the price up in this auction remains to be seen, but I suspect we’ll see this one come in quite a bit above the ’73 RS Replica. This is a beautiful car that has had a lot of work, and while it still needs a little bit of work to run at its full potential, it will undoubtedly make for a fantastic car.

-Rob

Motorsport Monday: 1971 Porsche 911 RSR Martini Racing replica

I think I’ve made it pretty clear that I think Martini Racing colors are just awesome. Some people insist everything looks better in “Gulf Blue”, but for me, it’s those Martini stripes that made some of the best looking race cars (and in a very few cases, even improved road cars). Case in point is today’s example; perhaps one of the strangest downforce attempts of the 1970s on a Porsche – the Mary Stuart tailed Martini Racing RSR. While a neat design in some ways, it certainly looks odd from other angles. Today’s 1971 911 is a recreation of the original, but you can’t deny that it looks fantastic in the proper Martini Racing colors of the 1973 RSR:

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Year: 1971
Model: 911
Engine: 2.7 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: N/A mi
Price: $165,000

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1971 911 RSR Martini Racing replica on racecars.com

Description

This is a 1971 Porsche 911 race car that has been restored to be a replica of a 1973 Porsche Martini Racing RSR. The tub is 100% rust free. The engine is a 2.7 with RS pistons and race cams. The transmission is a 915 with limited slip. After finding the person that built and owned the car it was discovered that this car was replicated from a original 1973 Martini RSR. We were told that the panel are made from one of the original Mary Stuart cars. This car is all 1970’s. the front has Bilstein coil over struts,aluminium S calipers and ajustable sway bar. All body panels are fiber glass. the rear panels are removable. No side windows,wipers or head lights. The engine is a very reliable track engine. At this time there are about eight hours of Porsche Club Drivers Education on the car. The car is fast and is very fun to drive. We are open to offers.
History
none avalible

Performance Data

Weight: 1980 lbs

Engine

Engine Builder: Porsche
Manufacturer: Porsche
Type: 911
Displacement: 2.7
Horsepower: 225
Induction: Webbers
Heads: Porsche
Block: Porsche
Pistons: 2.7 RS
Total Time: 2 hours

Fuel System

Fuel Cell
Manufacturer: ATL
Age: unknown
Capacity: 15 Gal
Fuel Pump: Holley

Transmission

Manfacturer: Porsche
Type: 915

Body

Construction: Fiberglass
Color: Silver
Condition: new

Interior

Color/Finish: black
Fire System: none
Guages: VDO

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Anytime the numbers are sub 2,000 lbs and over 200 hp, you’re guaranteed to have fun. While not as potent as the original RSR and running a more subdued 2.7 power plant, this car will be certainly much cheaper to run. Add to that the fact that the price of the original is a million dollar plus car, and running a replica makes a lot more sense. This car wouldn’t likely be eligible to run in vintage events, but would certainly draw a crowd at local Porsche Club Racing events, or you could blow everyone’s mind at your local club Driver’s Education. Older 911 race cars aren’t cars for beginners, but aren’t to be quite as feared as their reputation, either – sticky rubber helps keep them planted.

In regards to value, a normal 2.7 race car would struggle to bring $50,000, even if it was a clean car. Like the 1974 RSR replica I wrote up a few weeks ago, the value in this car is in the build – though I think this car is relying a bit too much on the paint and unique tail carrying the value. All in all, I really like the 1974 car was a better, cleaner build with more speed potential for around the same money. It wouldn’t be very hard to add the Martini stripes to that car, either. But, if you really must stand out from the crowd, why not do it with the craziest duck tail ever?

-Carter

Motorsport Monday – 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR replica

In the 1970s, Porsche was on a racing high. It seemed wherever they went and whatever they produced, they won. The focus on motorsport and development through racing lead to some notable production based racers and crossover technology. In 1973 Porsche released the legendary 911 Carrera RS, a homologated race car that could be road registered. Through 1974 it received many upgrades that made it more competitive as a race car, but ultimately the factory saw an opportunity to take even the hard-edged RS to the next level. Thus was born the 911 Carrera RSR, the Rennest of the RennSport models. Running 917 wheels and brakes with lightened panels resulting in a sub-2,000lb curb weight and a 3.0 flat six pushing 330 horsepower, these cars were formidable racers that competed against tube frame F1 engined cars – and won. Highly sought after but with less than 60 produced, finding one to buy is both a pricey and difficult proposition. However, many of the pieces are available to make a recreation, just as today’s example is:

Year: 1974
Model: 911 Carrera RSR
Engine: 3.8 liter flat-6
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: N/A mi
Price: $150,000

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR replica on Race-Cars.com

Description
Ground Up-Scratch built from a 1974 coupe,no expense spared to build this new,classic and fast RSR.Over $190k invested.Only 25 race hours on the car.Build sheet and extensive photos available.
Performance Data
• Weight: 2035 lbs
Engine
• Engine Builder: Porsche
• Manufacturer: Porsche
• Type: 911 RSR
• Displacement: 3.8L
• Horsepower: 402
• Torque: 279
• Heads: Camfer
• Connecting Rods: Carrillo RSR
• Pistons: 3.8 Supercup
• Camshaft: Ultra Race Cams
• Clutch: RSR
• Pressure Plate: RSR
• Flywheel: RSR
• Total Time: 10 race hours
Fuel System
• Fuel Cell
• Manufacturer: ATL
• Age: new
• Capacity: 17g
Oil/Water System
• Oil Cooler: 935
Transmission
• Manfacturer: Porsche
• Type: G50
• Gears: 6
• Shifter: Hargett
• Trans Cooler: 935
Rear End
• Differential: Torque Diff
Body
• Construction: steel/fiberglass
• Condition: excellent
Chassis
• Front Suspension: 935 RSR strut monoball billet
• Rear Suspension: 930 set up
• Shocks: JRZ 1231 3 way
• Wheels: Penta/BBS 917 11.3×16 14×16
• Tires: Hoosier
Spares
• $10k of spares

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Looking at those rear wheels should qualify as a religious experience. It’s a stark reminder that this was a time when there were no computers to control wheelspin, slip angles, and brake lockup. Determined to prove to the world that a 30/70 weight bias would work, Porsche put massive flares which just barely contained those nearly square wheels and a giant rear spoiler – the origin of the loved 80s “Whale Tail” spoiler that would adorn so many Turbos. This car has been faithfully re-created where necessary and important, but upgraded in all of the right areas – the G50 transmission is a great addition, and who wouldn’t need 20 percent more power and modern rubber to keep it planted? Read through most advertisements and run across the phrase “no expense spared” and they’re usually suspect, but in this case it’s hard not to believe. The car looks amazingly good and shockingly clean for a race car – check out that engine bay! I even love that they used a correct 1974 chassis as a basis, since many replicas use an easier to obtain newer car retrofitted with earlier panels.

At $150,000, this isn’t a car for everyone. It won’t be as fast as newer Cup Cars around a track. It won’t be easy to drive. It won’t even be cheap to run. However, this is very much the case of you couldn’t build it for the sale price. You could run $50,000 building the proper engine alone! What appeals to me about a car like this, though, is that it has a presence about it that the newer cars just can’t replicate. Pull up anywhere with this and you’re guaranteed to have a crowd. Then, take a moment to consider what it would cost to own a real one; the last that came up for sale was Emerson Fittipaldi’s IROC racer in the $800,000 range. In 2012, the 2.1 turbo RSR “Baby” sold for $3.25 Million. And the reality is, at that price would you really even want to drive (never mind race) one of those irreplaceable cars? Not likely. This then, is the way to have your cake and eat it too – look like a million bucks, have a million thrills, and don’t be (too) afraid to write it all off. To me, that’s a deal – now, anyone know what organs I can live without that would generate $150,000?

-Carter

1988 Porsche 911 Martini Tribute

What do you get when you combine the winningest marque in motorsports, the world’s toughest rallye, and a legendary rallye driver? You get this stunning tribute to Björn WaldegÃ¥rd’s 1978 entry in to the East African Safari Rally. While the combination of WaldegÃ¥rd and porsche never produced a victory in the 1978 Safari Rallye, the combo teamed up 34 years later for a victory in the 2011 Safari Rallye Classic.

This impecably done tribute for sale in Costa Mesa, California is an instant throwback, and embodies everything that made the late’70s motorsports awesome.

1988 Porsche 911 3.2 Martini Tribute on eBay

1988 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.2 RS Martini

East Africa Safari Rallye Björn Waldegård Tribute

VIN # WP0AB0910JS121255 146,200 chassis miles (7,500 miles since build)

Grand Prix White with Martini Graphics and Black Leather Interior 5-Speed G50 Manual Transmission

Clean and Clear Title

Original California 2-Owner Car

No Accidents/Original Paint

Numbers Matching

Vehicle Located in Atlanta, GA

In the late ‘70s, the Porsche motorsport department set itself challenges away from asphalted surfaces. The East African Safari Rally entered into Porsche racing history as an extraordinary trial for driver and technicians. In fact, the African Safari is considered by many to be the world’s toughest rally.  In 1978, Porsche sent two modified 911 SC 3.0 sponsored by Martini to the starting line.

Porsche dominated the field, until a technical defect threw WaldegÃ¥rd, who had a lead of 46 minutes, back into fourth place. The team of Preston and Layl ended the rally in second place overall. WaldegÃ¥rd was one of the premier rally drivers starting and went on to win the championship the following year as a driver for Lancia.  Porsche eventually settled its account with the African continent in the Paris-Dakar Rally: the Porsche 911 Carrera 4×4 won there in 1984, followed two years later by the legendary Porsche 959.

With all the RS/RSR clones out on the market, dare to be different with a unique tribute to this important part of Porsche racing.  The smiles, thumbs-ups, and positive comments are numerous every time we take the care out for a spin.   If many of you are like us, we love the look of the vintage Porsche racecars and have always dreamed of driving them.  However, many of us don’t have the time to race and would prefer to drive our toys rather than look at them in our garage.  So, we created this car to appeal to people like us:  those who love to drive.

I must admit, as we get older, the thought of driving a thoroughbred racecar on a 1,000-mile drive has become less and less appealing.  So, when we built this car, we focused on making this car very drivable, comfortable, reliable, and still fun.  We had this car custom built about 4 years ago for a good friend of ours in Atlanta.  He was very specific with his details.  He wanted a car that he and his wife could use in the prestigious Carolina Trophy road rally.  It had to be comfortable enough to got thousands of miles; it also had to be reliable; and, finally, it had to win.  And, it did just that.  In 2010, they won the Carolina Trophy!

Ed and Jeannie Cave are the perfect people to purchase a collectible Porsche from.  They have that eye for details.  Being in the design industry, they like things right.  After they received this tribute Porsche from us (AutoKennel), they took it another step further.  They put some of their touches into the car to make it pop.  They mounted a pair of  dash Heuer Rally Master clocks and a top-shelf Monit TC200 Rally Computer with a pedal-operated reset switch.  This is valued at over $6,000 worth of collectible equipment.  Both look great and are extremely functional.  The car even appealed to Vic Elford (Porsche Factory rallye driver) who chose it as his favorite car of a PCA event.  He commemorated his choice by signing the underside of the hood (see attached pictures).

We started the project in late 2007 when we found a Grand Prix white over black 1988 3.2 Carrera.  The car was immaculate.  It had a 138,000 miles, 2-SoCal owners, and the original paint.  Honestly, it was almost too nice to transform.  But, Ed was very particular about starting with an original white car and one with a G50 gearbox.  The flat six engine was pulled and its top end rebuilt. The 5-speed G50 transmission was disassembled and restored to new, and the entire powertrain was cleaned, reassembled and reinstalled with a mildly modified exhaust and an existing performance chip left in place. Horsepower is estimated to be near 240 and, better still, the engine retains incredible reliability and drivability without the peakiness of a full-fledged race motor.

That power is put to the ground through a chassis tuned and reinforced for the rigors of long distance rallying. For starters, the entire suspension was disassembled and checked for integrity before all bushings were replaced with stiffer and stronger polyurethane units from Elephant Racing. Bilstein HD shocks were installed to control wheel travel, the ride height raised slightly to accommodate potentially choppy road conditions and the 7×16 and 8×16 Fuchs alloy wheels powdercoated white to match the factory race car.

Outside, the 911 wears the same livery as the 1978 East African Safari rally car complete with a fluorescent orange front bumper, blue sills and rear bumper, and removable vinyl Martini sponsorship logos and striping throughout. Early H4 headlights with yellow lenses reside in each front fender and, when necessary, are complimented by three Cibie fog lights up front and a unique rear Hella out back. Getty Racing provided a lightweight and downforce-generating duck tail engine cover, and both it and the hood are held in place with race-spec rubber tie-downs. Also visible at both the front and rear of the car are the aluminum skid plates that shield mechanical components from damage.

Inside, the 911’s high performance intentions were furthered with the deletion of the rear seats, replacement of the door panels with lightweight RS units and installation of early light-weight carpeting. The stock seats were replaced with custom Scheel items upholstered in perforated leather and piped in the Martini racing colors, a MOMO Prototipo steering wheel took the place of the stock unit, and the shifter was swapped for a WEVO short-throw mechanism that reduces throws by 30%. The aforementioned Heuer Rally Master clocks and Monit TC200 Rally Computer highlight the dash and, just to the side of the Monit, lies an infrared remote that controls the hidden, iPod compatible Alpine stereo. Even with the addition of the ST style roll bar, the changes within the cabin help to reduce the 911’s curb weight by nearly 100 pounds.

European Car was so impressed with the build that they sent a writer to Ed’s neighborhood for a full test drive and feature article.

All lights, gauges, clock, turn signals, power windows, sunroof, wipers and auxiliary lights work.  The factory air conditioning currently blows cool, but not ice cold air. The Optima red top battery has a cut-off switch to maintain a charge during storage and the oil was last changed 500 miles ago.  Finally, the 911 comes complete with many service receipts, passed Georgia emissions tests, an original owner’s manual, a service manual, a largely complete tool kit, a copy of the European Car article and a manual for the Monit rally computer.

Few cars possess the reliability and performance to win TSD rallies. Fewer still the comfort needed to entice non-gearheads to join in the fun. This 911, is a unique opportunity and offers its next owner the chance to drive competitively in a beautiful, fast and comfortable car and, if they so choose, to do so with the company of a loved one.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Paul at 714-335-4911 or paul@autokennel.com
For tons of pictures, go to: http://www.AutoKennel.com

As with the Dakar Rally tribute car a few weeks back, it’s tough to put a price on such a car. Cars like this don’t really fit in anywhere. It is too new for true vintage racing, and likely wouldn’t pass tech for any rallye competition. So what do you buy something like this for?  Cool factor. There is no doubt that this car is a head turner no matter where it goes, and with the 3.2 lump, racing suspension, and light weight this car has to be a blast to drive.

So all things considered, who is a buyer for this car? My guess is that if you get the right combination of Porsche fanatic, and Rally fanatic, you’d have someone willing to shell out the $53,990 for this beauty.

-Brian

1974 Porsche Carrera RSR 3.0

In the spirit of this weekend’s edition of the 24 Hours of Lemans here is a car that competed on the track. I suspect our lack of posts this weekend may have something to do with us staying up for the past 24+ hours enjoying a pretty entertaining Lemans.

This RSR has been up for sale a few places this year and has been listed a few times on eBay. The seller lists the car as having competed at Lemans, Daytona, Sebring, and more and it comes with FIA papers and history.
An original factory genuine RSR with race history is not going to go cheap. With a day left bidding is up to $260,000 with the reserve not being met. I saw the car listed in Hemmings for $600,000, on the dealer’s website for $595,000, and previously on eBay bid up to $500,100 ending with the reserve not met.

This would be a super car for major vintage racing events. Not for the faint hearted or slim walleted individual. The car could go to a museum, but deserves to be somewhere where it can see track time.

~Evan