1997 Porsche 911 Cup 3.8 RSR

While for some the Turbo S and GT2s are the pinnacle of 993 performance and desirability for understandable reasons, for me it’s the Supercup cars that really excite. Building on the 964 Cup design, the 993 received a special version of the Carrera RS’s 3.8 liter M64/20. Dubbed the M64/70, a plastic intake, hotter cams, no cats and a unique non-MAF Motronic computer yielded 315 horsepower. Then, just as they had with the 964, Porsche upped the ante again with the 3.8 RSR. The RSR had an even more unique motor – the M65/75 – which went to a aluminum resonance manifold and individual throttle bodies and hot cams to produce 349 horsepower. You could opt for three different specifications for sprint or endurance, and two different transmission options (one with additional cooling). Outside, in addition to the Cup splitter and giant rear spoiler, the RSR featured GT2-esque tacked on flares covering massive 18″ BBS center-lock magnesium race wheels. It was, in all, a very special package and a claimed 45 were produced.

The thing is, this isn’t one of them. Well, sorta…

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Cup 3.8 RSR on eBay

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Motorsports Monday: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Supercup

Here we have a pretty rare opportunity. Of course, such opportunities come with a high cost, but I can’t imagine the market for a car like this ever really extends to us regular buyers anyway. You expect to pay a lot. This is one of only 40 Carrera Supercup 911s built in 1995 and reportedly is the only one that was sent to the U.S. From what I gather it hasn’t really seen any race time (or at least not within the Porsche Supercup series) as it was intended as a show/demonstration car for Bridgestone. Its graphics make that aspect pretty clear. It looks in wonderful condition and that it is eligible for vintage racing certainly is a nice bonus for the owner who’d like to experience a legit Porsche factory racer.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Supercup on Excellence Magazine

Year: 1995
Model: 911 Carrera Supercup
Engine: 3.6 liter flat-6
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: unlisted mi
Price: $395,000

Originally purchased by the Bridgestone Corporation as a VIP car used to introduce and promote the new SO2 tire. It is one of only 40 Supercup cars built in ’95 and the only one sent to the US. Hurley Haywood and David Murry were the hired drivers for this car. Class winner at the Porsche Parade and Excellence Magazine cover car. I have just completed a light restoration to museum quality condition of how it appeared in 1995. The car has never been crashed and retains the original engine and gearbox. It retains proper Recaro seats, correct dash, instruments and interior panels as well as proper alloy front lid and original rear wing. A great addition to any collection and can be vintage raced. Please ring me with any questions. Thank you.

Serious inquiries please call 631-786-6511 EST. International inquiries please email me at dahearn67@gmail.com.

Please visit link below for full images:
http://www.porsport.com/1996_993_supercup_car

http://www.PORsport.com

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The Porsche Supercup series makes for some pretty great racing. I’ve only had a chance to see them race in person once – Silverstone in 2004 – but it was some of the most interesting racing of the weekend. That is to be expected with this type of series and certainly part of the popularity of this sort of racing in general. The racing is tight, aggressive, and with action throughout. And while the Supercup cars can’t match the audacity and ferocity of an F1 car the sights and sounds are still plenty exhilarating.

As noted above, I don’t think this one has participated in any of that actual racing, but the car itself is more or less the same as those racers. It also sounds like it’s pretty much original, which in itself is a nice treat with a car like this. Race car values can be kind of all over the place and judging one without any particular racing pedigree can be even more difficult. So I guess it really comes down to how much a particular buyer wants a factory 993 racer. If that is your desire, then this is a nice opportunity to get your hands on a special 911.

-Rob

Wednesday Wheels Roundup: Ruf/Speedline Edition

Are there better looking wheels than the 5-spokes made by Speedline in the mid late 80s to early 90s? I’m not sure there are; the proportions are perfect, the finishes were awesome – they just suited the cars really well. They were the counterpoint to the BBS wheels and were also popular on the track. A few decades on, they’re now worth more than just about any wheels from the period – more even than the fan-favorite BBS RS. But if you have a Porsche and you want the ultimate period wheel, Speedlines are the way to go in my opinion. Here’s a selection of a few different versions of the Ruf wheels; from the original “Yellowbird” wheels through the more recent BTR and CTR wheels, along with some great Alessios and some Kenesis Supercups. Enjoy!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Ruf Speedline CTR2 18×9.5 5×130 Wheels on eBay

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Motorsport Monday: 1998 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup Factory Race Car

While copying factory cars such as earlier’s RSR Tribute has become a popular pastime for Porsche race enthusiasts, the reality is that those cars have a semi-limited market because they’re not authentic. However, about 16 or so years ago buying real factory race cars became a lot easier as Porsche began to officially sell the then new 996 GT3 Cup version of the venerable 911. With an upgraded 3.6 race motor, full cage and race suspension, air jacks and center-lock BBS wheels, this was as close to the big leagues as you could get from the factory. Additionally, Porsche continued to run a single marque race series, call the Supercup, that is had run with previous generations of race 911s. The Supercup was a feeder series for more popular forms of endurance racing and still is, but the car has remained the same; outside it looks a lot like the 911s you can drop down to the showroom to buy; underneath, it’s pure race car. As with previous generations, every few years there are upgrades that effectively render the older cars obsolete and they become much easier to purchase; today’s 1998 is an example of just such a car. Though they may not be as fast as the current generation, usually these cars are still quite competitive in club racing and are considerably more affordable than new options. Additionally, factory race Porsches, especially ones with significant racing history, have proven to be a good investment long term. If you can gamble on the right one and stomach the high running costs, you’ll have an impressive and capable machine that will probably come out the other side worth more than you paid:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup on Ebay

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