2019 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe

I feel like living a little lavishly today. Here we have a GT Silver Metallic 2019 Porsche 911 Turbo S. It’s brand new and waiting to be purchased. The Turbo S itself combines the best of luxury and performance that Porsche can offer. It’s supercar performance that ensconces you in leather and comfort. There’s 580 hp directed to all four wheels. The dual-clutch 7-speed PDK transmission either can shift smooth and comfortably or put it in Sport Plus mode and it’ll bang home shifts as quickly and ferociously as possible. Rear-axle steering, center-lock wheels, and massive 410 mm six-piston ceramic brakes keep everything under control. The Turbo S isn’t quite the top of the luxury performance food chain since Porsche also offers the Turbo S Exclusive, but this will have to do for now.

This particular example has decided to turn the dial up just a little bit and that’s the reason I’m interested in it. For starters, it has carbon fiber wheels. They’ll set you back a mere $14,980. Please do not bump them into a curb. It’s fitted with the Turbo Aerokit, which adds a little dynamism to the exterior because you wouldn’t want passersby confusing this with a regular 911. The interior too receives a few carbon fiber accents helping to tie interior and exterior together. Also in that interior is the optional Burmester sound system. Frankly, if you’re willing to spring for the carbon wheels, I’d be disappointed if you didn’t also add the better sound.

All together I really like this Turbo S. I wish it wasn’t Silver, but it does seem to be making the most of what these cars have to offer and in that regard it’s a phenomenal example. And while not quite the Turbo S Exclusive it does come in around $50K less than one of those very limited models (and that’s without factoring in ADM).

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2019 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe on Rennlist

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Black or White Double Take: 1995 Audi S6

Update 1/17/19: The white S6 listed as sold for $8,900.

If you weren’t paying attention, a few weeks ago we saw a record high price (since they were new) for a C4 Audi. It was a particularly impressive 1993 Audi S4 with a scant 12,000 miles on the odometer, and it sold for $33,000. If that sounds like a lot, I’d wager it was still a relative bargain. Find an equal contemporaneous M5 or 500E, and you’d likely have to add a “1” in front of that sales number to take it home.

So here we are looking at two turbocharged quattro sedans of the same ilk. Both are the revised S6, both are well presented, but both are also driver-quality, with far more miles than appeared on the S4. Which is the one to take home? Let’s start with the late build 1995.5 in Pearlescent White Metallic:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995.5 Audi S6 on eBay

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2012 BMW 135i M-Sport

Update 1/17/19: This 135i is listed as sold at $18,000.

A few months ago I took a look at one of the best affordable driving packages from BMW in recent times – the E82 135i. The model I looked at was rare for a few reasons; clean, original 135is with a 6-speed manual are fairly hard to find, and on top of that the particular example was outfit in Alpine White and with the M-Sport package, plus it had the even more infrequently seen beige Boston leather interior. It was also fairly loaded and had lower mileage – all in all, a hard package to replicate.

2013 BMW 135i M-Sport

Well, I’ve come pretty close today. In some ways, this car may actually be a bit more desirable. Let me explain why:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2012 BMW 135i M-Sport on eBay

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1981 Porsche 924 Turbo

The major problem with yesterday’s 924 is as I noted the number of other 924s that are out there. So while the $2,000 asking price for a rare bit of Porsche history sounds like a steal on paper, when it comes to the 924 it is a completely different scenario.

Take today’s 1981 924 Turbo, for example. Like yesterday’s, its a survivor rather than a show piece. Also like the M471-equipped ’80, this ’81 931 sports the upgraded brakes, suspension, forged 15″ wheels, mudflaps and rear spoiler. Unlike yesterday’s car, though, this one has some serious advantages. First off, it’s a Turbo, and while the M471 924 is much more rare to find, the forced-induction model is substantially more desirable and valuable right now. Second, this one is in better shape than the Diamond Silver Metallic example. And, of course, it’s got an automatic advantage of being in running and driving condition. So how much extra does this all cost you? A lot less than you’d think:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1981 Porsche 924 Turbo on eBay

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2000Tuesday: 1974 BMW 2002 Turbo

With only 1,672 produced now some 45 years ago, your odds of coming across a 2002 Turbo today are fairly unlikely. Yet over the past few years I’ve taken a look at a steady stream of the legendary hot E10. While the M5 is often credited with being the first real ‘super sedan’, a decade before that model launched BMW’s fledgling Motorsports division breathed heavily on the diminutive 2-door sedan, creating a pint-sized sports car killer. I covered what made it so special back in 2017:

1974 BMW 2002 Turbo

The third 2002 we’ve looked at in three weeks, this is one that definitely ticks the right boxes as the collector car left out of the EAG Legends collection. But what will it take to buy today?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1974 BMW 2002 Turbo on eBay

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1988 Audi 5000CS quattro

One of the reasons it’s hard to get excited about the Type 43 Audi is just how far forward the bar was moved with the Type 44. Similar to the leap from the 6-series to the 8-series BMW, the Type 44 was a radical departure both in style, aerodynamics, and chassis dynamics. The basic Type 44 chassis would endure a remarkable run, too – from its basic layout in the Forschungsauto FV Auto 2000 from the 1981 Frankfurt Auto Show right through the derivative D11 V8 quattro through the 1994 model year. The C3 was revolutionary in its incorporation of modern aerodynamic devices, helping to drop drag coefficients to a then-excellent .30 cd. The Audi design prompted many copies, the most notable of which was the very popular Ford Taurus.

But the C3 was about more than just a slick body. Underneath it continued the C2’s turbocharging on top-tier models. With the addition of intercooling, power was up quite a bit from the prior model. Where the 1983 5000 Turbo generated 130 horsepower and 142 lb.ft of torque in U.S. trim, the C3’s MC1 brought 158 horsepower and 166 lb.ft of torque to the party. It was good enough to prompt notoriously BMW-friendly Car and Driver to name it to its ’10 Best’ list for the first time. In the later 200 20V, it also brought a tamed version of Audi’s Sport Quattro motor to market. The Ingolstadt company also pioneered full body galvanization, something that would become the norm for many newer cars moving forward. That body also grew, as Audi added its signature ‘Avant’ model to the lineup. But of course the big news was the 1986 addition of the word synonymous with Audi in the 1980s and ever since – quattro:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Audi 5000CS quattro on St. Louis Craigslist

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2000Tuesday: 1969 BMW 2002ti turbocharged

Update 11/20/18: Blast from the past! I wrote this custom turbocharged drag racing BMW 2002 back in the Summer of 2014. It failed to sell on eBay but apparently did change hands, and the current owner has relisted it with basically the same photos and information as the original listing. The reserve auction has yet to get a bid at the $5,500 opening bid. It’s a long road ahead to get this one back in shape, but it’s still a pretty neat car!

I know what you’re thinking. “Carter”, you’re saying, “you spent a little too much time around the high test this weekend. This thing is a wreck”. And you know what? You’re right. This car is a wreck. Yet I’m still mystified by it, like a Siren’s call – there is just something about period race cars that I find very, very cool. So if you’ll indulge me a bit let’s look at this turbocharged 2002ti from 1969. Perhaps not the most likely car you’d consider for the form of motorsport it ended up in, this car was modified in the early 1970s by Holger Tapp. Mr. Tapp built his own turbocharged setup, running a KKK turbo through the twin Weber carbs. Then Mr. Tapp went racing – drag racing – with this 2002. The period picture reveals the car appeared to originally be a orange and wear some awesome BBS magnesium race wheels. Some of that original color can still be seen on the unmounted and damage chin spoiler. According to some light research I found, Holger Tapp was actually quite successful with the car, according to a competitor winning quite often. It also appears that at some point he built a second, more wildly flared car that picked up the BBS wheels – indeed, in one photo the plate “HU AV 303” this car wears can be seen on that car. The rest of the history appears to be pretty fuzzy; however, if you brush up on your German, Holger Tapp is still in business today doing much the same thing:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 BMW 2002 turbocharged on eBay

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1984 Audi Quattro

Okay, the third blue Audi in a row and so far I’ve been batting out in terms of cars I’d put in my ultimate garage. While the Audi TT would be on the list, the 180 version wouldn’t be my first choice, and though I wouldn’t kick the S4 out of my bed, I’d opt for a Avant version first. So how about my favorite chassis?

I’ve owned something like 8 or 9 Audi B2s, and though I came very close to owning a Quattro once, my history doesn’t include the illustrious leader of the pack. But a Quattro would very certainly be on my list of ultimate Audis. Which one would I want? Well, if money were no object, I’d probably choose a RR 20V first. The last of the run produced right through the 1991 model year, they were also arguably the best of the breed too; more refined than early models and sporting the 3B 2.2 liter 20V engine we saw in the 200 20V. While 20V conversions are popular, this one was factory. Here’s a link to a nice ’89 that’s for sale for a bit over $100,000.

More affordable are the cars that actually came to the U.S.. It’s a bit of a chuckle, though, as only a few years ago you could pick up a really nice example for well under $20,000. Today, those same cars are trading between $40,000 and $60,000 depending on condition. Here’s a very nice ’84 that comes in right at the middle of that range (and half the amount of the lustful RR) – so how does it stack up?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Audi Quattro on eBay

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Motorsports Monday: BMW Legends Collection

Let’s say you want to start a car collection, and for ease of argument’s sake, let’s say you’re really into BMWs. Which is the model you want? You could be a 507 enthusiast, love the classic 3.0 CSL or 2002, envy every E30 or lust over the modern muscle the company produces. But odds are if you’re reading these pages you, like me, gravitate towards BMW’s Motorsport models.

Within the Pantheon of classic models, there then comes the difficult decisions. How do you choose between the E30 M3 and the 1M, for example? Well, Enthusiast Auto Group has a suggestion. Why not have them both? Or, even better, why not assemble all of the greatest hits from BMW’s M division over the past 40 years and put them together into one curated, turn-key package?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: The Collection of BMW Legends at Enthusiast Auto Group

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2001 Audi S4 Avant

It seems appropriate to follow yesterday’s S8 with this model. In just a few years, Audi went from only one S model with very limited production imported in the C4 S6 to three models. Top of the range was the S8, but it shared its running gear and sonorous V8 in a slightly detuned state with the new C5 S6. For Audi enthusiasts, though, big news came with the launch of the new S4.

It was unrelated to the first S4 because of Audi’s renaming strategy in 1995. That meant that the new S4 was based on the small chassis B5, and U.S. enthusiasts finally got a taste of Audi’s M3 competitor. Performance came in the form of a new 2.7 twin-turbocharged V6 30V and was mated to either a 5-speed Tiptronic transmission like its bigger siblings or a 6-speed manual. Like other B5s, the S4 made use of the 4th generation of quattro technology driving all four wheels. This utilized a Torsen center differential with open front and rear differentials, both of which employed the ABS sensors to electronically ‘lock up’ the slipping wheels when a speed differentiation was detected. Like other S models, some light revisions to the bodywork and more pronounced exhaust were present, along with polished mirrors and 17″ Avus-design wheels. Most notable was the large front bumper cover with 6 gaping grill covers which hid the twin intercoolers for the motor. With 250 horsepower and 295 lb.ft of torque, you had an all-weather 155 mph warrior. And, it was available as an Avant:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Audi S4 Avant on quattroworld.com

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