1970 Mercedes-Benz 280SL

If I had a dollar for every time I see the terms ”like-new”, ”showroom condition” or even worse, ”restored” when looking at a used car ad, I’d have a lot more cars. The overwhelming majority of the time these terms don’t apply to the car listed for sale and are just used by overzealous sellers just trying to drum up interest. I fight every urge to send them a sarcastic message saying that I didn’t know Mercedes sold new cars on the showroom floor with cracked dashes and stains on the carpets, but I resist. Either way, it ruins the term in my eyes because of how loosely it gets tossed around. Today, one of those cars actually deserves all those marketing terms because it is actually true. This 1970 Mercedes-Benz 280SL for sale in Texas was restored, is like-new and is certainly in showroom condition. However, if you want to own this car, I hope your net worth is in seven-figures. It is that expensive.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1970 Mercedes-Benz 280SL on eBay

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1970 Porsche 911T Targa

Today and tomorrow I’ve got a couple cars to post that are quite a bit less pristine than what I typically like to feature. Both will need some work, but each provides a nice base with which to begin that work. And, more importantly, both are interesting enough that there should be a desire from some to return them to their full glory.

I’ll begin with this one: a Signal Orange 1970 Porsche 911T Targa, located in California, with 126,868 miles on it. This one is all about the color as it’s one of the best on an early 911. That it’s a 911T in need of work also should mean that the selling price falls very much on the reasonable side of the spectrum. At least, it should. Will it?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1970 Porsche 911T Targa on eBay

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Double Take: Albert Blue 1970 Porsche 911T – Coupe or Targa?

Update 12/24/2017 – The price of the Targa has dropped $10,000 to $89,995.

Believe it or not it’s been a few months since I featured a long-hood 911. I guess there haven’t been many lately to really grab my attention. So why not double up with two? Albert Blue is a really nice non-metallic blue that was available on these early 911s and as it happens there are two available right now, both from the same model year and same 911 model. But one is a Coupe and the other a Targa. So if you like the color, now you just have to pick your body style!

Let’s start with the Coupe: a 1970 Porsche 911T Coupe, located in Alabama, with 69,814 miles on it. It’s been fully restored, is numbers matching, and looks great.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1970 Porsche 911T Coupe on eBay

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Conda Green 1970 Porsche 911E Coupe

Here we have another lovely rare-colored 911 that we so seldom come across. Truth be told, I strongly would have considered featuring this 911E even if its color was more common because it is such a nice overall example of these early Porsches. That it does wear such a rare color simply adds to the mystique and the allure. This is a Conda Green 1970 Porsche 911E Coupe, located in California, with black interior. The engine has been rebuilt and hasn’t covered too many miles since that work, but overall this 911 has seen plenty of miles (168K) and surely provided its owners immense joy over those years. To find such an interesting example that also has been well used in its life always makes us smile.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Conda Green 1970 Porsche 911E Coupe on eBay

Year: 1970
Model: 911E
Engine: 2.0 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 168,800 mi
Price: $134,990 Buy It Now

1-Family Owned for 27-Years
SoCal Porsche from New
Rare and Great Original Color

VIN#
ENG# 6201084 (911/01)
TRN# 7105413
Numbers Matching
800 Miles on recent Top End Engine Rebuild
34,000 Miles on Full Engine Rebuild
68,800 Miles on Odometer (168,800 on chassis)
Conda Green (26) on Black Leatherette (11)
5-Speed Manual Transmission (901)
Clean and Clear California title
Straight and Dry Chassis
3-SoCal Owners from New
Original Sales Window Sticker and Maintenance Book
Porsche Certificate of Authenticity
Early S Registry and R Gruppe Member Owned

This 911E was built in December of 1969 and sold new by Estes Zipper Porsche/Audi of Beverly Hills, California on February 18th, 1970. The first owner was a well-recognized music composer of film and radio scores. He kept the car until he passed away in 1989 after sadly loosing his battle with cancer. The current owner’s father-in-law was a jazz trumpet player, lyricist, and composer. He was a close friend with the original owner as they worked together. He had always admired this Conda green 911 E and after his friend’s passing, he asked the original owner’s daughter if he could purchase it. For the next 17-years, he enjoyed the car until his passing in 2006. At this point, the current owner (son-in-law) purchased the car.

All three owners obviously loved this car and were passionate about its care. Most services have been documented from day 1. Besides biannual services at the dealer or qualified independent shop, the first owner had major services performed at all of the correct intervals. In the early 80’s, this owner moved to Washington State and brought the car with him. Shortly after moving there, he got caught in a rainstorm and slid off the road into the shoulder. The damage was light on the front right fender, wheel well, and door. It was properly repaired and noted to be fairly minor. The repairs are carefully documented. Besides normal services, this owner also replaced the clutch and had the motor resealed. Furthermore, in 1978 with 56k-miles on the car, the original owner properly converted the hydropneumatic front suspension to a factory 911S setup. Factory aluminum S brakes were used as well as Koni strut inserts. All the work was done by Beverly Hills Foreign Car Centre. This is an expensive job and cost $1,200 back in the day. That’s the equivalent of $6,000 in today’s money.

When the 2nd owner purchased the car in the late 80’s, it had about 100k-miles on the clock. He brought the car back down to Southern California and began his nearly 2-decade ownership affair. The first major work was performed in 1990 right at 100k-miles. He had the transmission completely rebuilt, overhauled the brake system, and rebuilt the pedal assembly. The total cost was over $4k at the time. This owner then continued the same regular service regimen, as had the original owner.

In 2000/134k-miles, the current owner (son-in-law) had just pulled up to the owner’s house in a pristine ’73 911 S. This inspired the 2nd owner to clean up this Conda green 911. So, the car went out to a local shop for a repaint (the original paint was looking a bit tired) and at the same time, he had the drivetrain pulled and engine rebuilt. He had always used the famed shop, Aurel & Don’s of North Hollywood. This shop has been a cornerstone of the air-cooled Porsche independent shop community. They have done work on many of the great collector’s cars including Jerry Seinfeld’s.

Highlights of the engine build included:

Mahle factory “S” pistons and cylinders
Replaced all bearings
Valve job
Chain tensioner update kit
Oil hoses and lines
All new gaskets
Replaced timing chains, sprockets, guides, and rocker arms
Stainless steel heat exchangers
Clutch kit/machine flywheel
Replace factory oil cooler

Further work done during this refurbishment included:

Repaint the whole car
New front seat covers and door cards
Replaced carpet
New dash
Replaced rubber seals as needed

Aurel & Don’s did most of the reassembly after paint. In total, over $32,000 was invested. In today’s dollars, this would be equivalent to nearly $50,000.

The son-in-law/current owner purchased the car in 2006 with 153k-miles. He is a longtime Early S Registry and R Gruppe member who is very active in the local early long hood 911 scene. He continued the same excellent care to the car and over the past decade/15k-miles performed the following significant services:

Install European H4 headlights
Replaced deco trim all the way around
Sourced factory deep 6×15 wheels/refurbished by Harvey Weidman
Refurbished the suspension by Steve Alarcon with Johnson’s Alignment
New front correct Koni strut inserts and rear Bilstein shocks
Replaced transmission mounts
Shifter bushings
Turbo tie rods
Wheel bearings
Installed front and rear swaybars
Installed period correct retractable front seatbelts (including rear panels)
Front suspension pan replaced and refurbished fuel tank by John Esposito
Elephant Racing front strut brace
Installed correct Haargarn carpet
380mm RS leather wrapped steering wheel
Reconditioned pedal cluster
Rebuilt throttle bodies by Aaron Burnham
Replaced transmission mounts
Rebuild clock/convert to quartz movement
Replaced all 4-door pockets

Furthermore, he just had the top end of the engine rebuilt by Richard Dick of Air Cooled including all engine components properly cad plated or powder coated including fresh engine bay decals from Canford Classics. During the top end rebuild, three pistons were replaced as well as the MFI pump rebuilt and tuned. In total, the current owner has invested over $35,000 making sure this 911 E was always a great turnkey/ready to use example.

This 2.2L E is in excellent condition and clearly shows the careful ownership throughout its life. It was obviously never neglected, always driven, and properly maintained. The paint looks great for an older paint job. It was a decent quality job for the time. There are a few areas on the driver door where the paint is checking, but it is nearly impossible to see unless you are in the right light and a few inches away from the paint. There are minimal blemishes and we’ve tried to point out anything significant in the pics. The glass looks fantastic, as does the brightwork. The deep sixes have no curb rash and are wrapped in correct size (185/70 – 15) OEM specification Pirelli tires. The tires have more than half-life remaining as they were installed a few years ago/less than 3k-miles. The brakes have more than 50% life remaining.

The interior is equally as nice with minimal signs of wear. The seats, carpet, door panels, and dash all look fresh. The headliner appears to be original and in great shape as well with no tears. The sun visors are also original with hardly any puffing and just some pinch marks on the passenger side from years of hanging a mirror or garage door opener. The original kneepad has the slightest of cracks (see pic). All the gauges operate properly including the clock. All the buttons, switches, knobs, lights, and heat all work, as they should.

California registration is paid through November of 2017.

This 911 E includes the original owner’s manual with cover, factory maintenance booklet, original dealer window sales sticker, most receipts organized from new, original spare wheel/tire, extra keys, Porsche COA, and tool kit.

Go to our website: for full details and more history.

The ad provides us details of this 911E’s history and what we read gives testament to the condition and care shown to the car over its life. The ownership is documented and while life hasn’t been perfect for this 911 – it did suffer a minor accident a few decades back – it has been driven, enjoyed, and loved. It isn’t in “original, as-it-left-the-factory spec.” It has been repainted, the engine has been rebuilt and a good bit of the interior replaced. But it’s a rare 911 indeed that has seen frequent use throughout its 40+ years and not needed a refreshing of most of its components. Of significance to us now is that it looks in fine shape and is said to run and drive excellently. For the buyer hoping for a unique, well cared for, long-hood that still can be enjoyed this 911E makes for a nice opportunity.

Of course, much of the care and restorative work this 911 has seen brings with it a price. Add to that the very rare color and the price moves up even further. $135K is a lot for an E, near top market, and we could probably find a 911S for not too much more. The color wouldn’t be as rare nor the documentation as thorough, but that gives us some idea at least of where we’re sitting on price and what else might be out there. I would suspect we’d need higher levels of originality for this to sell here, but we’ll see. It’s a really nice looking E that should be ready to enjoy and I’ll definitely have my eye on it to see just where it might sell.

-Rob

King’s Ransom: 1970 Mercedes-Benz 600 Pullman

Last week I checked out at a 1972 Mercedes-Benz 600 that looked to be cared for by a wealthy stable owner in north Alabama. Today, we have another W100 to examine, but this one has quite a bit more history to sort through. This 1970 600 for sale in Portland, Oregon isn’t the normal standard wheelbase sedan you are used to seeing but rather it’s the rare Pullman version, which is one of 423 ever produced. Of course, those who ordered these cars usually weren’t your normal private citizens. So who was the original owner of this rolling symbol of power?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1970 Mercedes-Benz 600 Pullman on Hemmings

Year: 1970
Model: 600 Pullman
Engine: 6.3 liter V8
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 35,000 km (21,747 mi)
Price: $395,000

1970 Mercedes 600 Pullman

Ordered new by King Idris of Libya the same year he was overthrown by Muammar Gaddafi
Award winning restoration (fully documented)
All mechanicals are new or rebuilt
35,000 km’s (300 km since restoration)
Factory 040G black with bamboo leather
Complete set of factory spares kits and tool pouch
Price: $395,000 firm

The owner of this awesome 600 was King Idris of Libya who according to the build sheet, didn’t have possession of the car for too long. This Pullman was built in July of 1969 but unfortunately Idris was deposed a few months later in a coup d’etat by army officers led by a guy you might have heard of named Muammar Gaddafi. I’ve tracked down a photo of Idris getting out of the car attached below and even more amazingly, the Associated Press actually has video footage of Idris in Turkey on September 2nd, 1969 with the car that can be viewed here. That same day is when Libyan Army officers took control of the country. Naturally, Idris didn’t return to Libya choosing to head to Greece until ultimately going into exile in Egypt until his death in 1983 at the age of 94.

From there, the story is missing some chapters. From what I understand, this car was probably sold off (along with Idris’ other things) and ended up in Japan where it rested for over 20 years. From there, the car made its way to Los Angeles to a new owner where again, it sat. That’s where the current owner found it and sent it over to the Mercedes-Benz Classic Center in Irvine, California for extensive restoration in 2011. Now, it resides in Portland along with the owner’s five (that’s not a typo) other short-wheel-base 600s. I do remember seeing this car on display at Forest Grove Concours d’Elegance last year where it took home the Allen C. Stephens Elegance Award — which I have no idea what that means. I don’t run in the same circles as people who have cars nice enough to park on putting greens.

Now that the seller wants to move on from this Pullman, he is asking a whopping $395,000 – firm, no less. I know that the seller of this car wasn’t aware it was Idris’ car until after he purchased it but I’m sure he might have had an idea it had some kind of diplomatic ownership being so well-versed in 600 ownership. Just for comparison sake, there was a 1968 Pullman that was sold at an auction the Netherlands in 2015 that wasn’t a restored example, but still presentable, for just under $200,000. The notion that this car has some sort of increased value because it was owned for a month by a rather unknown King in Libya almost 48 years ago just doesn’t do it for me. I don’t think prior ownership factors into value unless maybe you were taking about one of the 600s owned by Lennon or Elvis and even then I’m weary. So while this 600 Pullman looks outstanding and surely has a cool history, almost $400,000 might just be a pipe dream number.

– Andrew

Roll the Dice? 1970 NSU 1200C

“Hey, nice Corvair!” , they’ll shout out the window at you, “What, did you leave it in the drier too long?

Most people I know seem to view me as some sort of idiot-savant, casually remembering which wheel styles were associated with what model, what colors various cars came in, engine specifications and call numbers – you get the point. But I have to admit to a huge gap in my automotive knowledge. Perhaps it’s a willful ignorance, but I’ll be damned if every single American car from the 1950s basically looks the same to me. I’ll take ‘Generically shaped cars for $1,000, Alex!’:

“What is Hudson!” (beeeeeep)
“What is a Studebaker?” (beeeeeep)
(more hesitant)
“Uh, what is Nash?” (beeeeeep)

Sure, like the rest of America who grew up before the year 1990, I can ID a 55 Chevy at a distance thanks to Don McLean’s insistence that you weren’t American if you couldn’t, but otherwise there’s this huge void of massive steel shapes that mean little to me.

What’s interesting is that I can so easily identify the differences between the Volkswagen 1500, the BMW 700, and the NSU Prinz. All were rear-engine, three-box sedans that were built at the same time. They all have a very, very similar shape. And yet, to me they’re as different as….well, a BMW and Volkswagen can be. NSUs are rare as the proverbial tooth of a hen here in the U.S., so is this forlorn 1200 worth a roll of the dice?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1970 NSU Prinz 1200C on eBay

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Gulf Blue 1970 Porsche 911T Coupe

We come across a wide range of descriptions when looking at ads for cars. Some are so short and vague as to be meaningless. Many follow a stereotypical salesman approach making bold hyperbolic claims about every positive aspect of the car while brushing aside the negatives. And others can be so wordy that the useful details get lost among a sea of model history (i.e. not the car’s history) narrative and general information that might apply to almost every example. There is another type; a better type. This ad is of that sort. It isn’t long, but the details are there. It answers many of the obvious questions and describes the car faithfully. That the seller works the pictures into the narrative actually helps as you can see what is being described. To a certain degree (and this probably is why I like the ad) it provides a lot of the information I would provide when featuring the car here. So read it!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Gulf Blue 1970 Porsche 911T Coupe on eBay

Year: 1970
Model: 911T
Engine: 2.2 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 75,550 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

For those of us who have to work for a living, affording the acquisition of a longhood 911 “F-Modell” has become quite a stretch. Especially the 2.2 and 2.4-liter cars of the 1970 to 1973 vintage seem to fit either one of two categories: they are either way too expensive, or rusted hulks in need of e-v-e-r-y-t-h-i-n-g.

Every once in a blue moon do we find a car that is still sensibly priced. It may not be a show winner, but it will have good bones and usually can be enjoyed for years to come just the way it is, thus allowing small improvements at one’s own pace, as time and funds allow.

This 1970 Porsche 911T 2.2 Coupe, VIN*9110101642*, is such a rare bird. It features all original floors without any obvious traces of corrosion, a B-grade paint job in Gulf Blue, a splendid, original-looking interior, and an original 2.2-liter, air-cooled boxer engine that makes all the right sounds when in full song.

Included in the sale is a binder containing invoices detailing the work performed during the past 7 years.

There are more than 80 documents in individual, clear plastic sheet protectors, neatly organized.

A new trunk mat is on order and will be included with this car. Yet, stripped naked, we find nothing but healthy factory sheet metal here, including the “nose” and suspension pan. Correct Interstate Type 911 battery is brand new. Spare wheel is MIA.

Undercarriage is au naturel and looks to be free of corrosion. Yes, this car is really 47 years old!

Originally a silvermetallic car (factory code #8080), this Porsche was repainted in its current Gulf Blue livery in 2011, at a cost of $4,000. The work order states “daily driver — not show quality.” After completion, windshield and rear window were reinstalled using new weatherstripping. Front bumper guards were omitted for a cleaner, European look. Note factory “S” trim.

Dash looks all stock, with the exception of a new dash top. Leather steering wheel cover shows some loose stitching. A new, correct headliner was installed in 2012 and a new carpet set in 2013.

Stock steering wheel and radio. All of the gauges work as they should.

Front seats look original and are in beautifully preserved condition. They are not as crisp anymore as freshly upholstered seats, having a nicely “lived in” feeling instead.

Flawless rear occasional seats can be folded forward individually.

Other mechanical work noted . . . new brake master cylinder, all new brake calipers and brake pads, front bearings and races in 2010. New shocks in 2011. New tires, intake gaskets, fuel line in 2012. New distributor, fuel pump, fuel pressure regulator, and coil in 2013. New clutch in 2015. New spark plugs, ignition, and plug wires in 2016.

Motorvation comes from a correct 2.195cc engine, fed by a 2 sets of triple-throat Zenith 40 carburetors. Current compression readings are between 150 and 160lbs on all 6 cylinders, indicating a healthy motor.

Engine number *6109005* is consistent with the manufacturing date of the chassis, thus it’s fair to assume that it is indeed the original engine the car was born with.

The motor runs great, with no ill behavior to report. Starting dead cold, the idle initially fluctuates a bit but once warmed up, it seems to be very happy. Helmut, our mechanic, says the car just needs a tankful of fresh high-test gas and to be driven – as fast as possible – for a few hours and it’ll smooth out even more.

So there is is, a great looking 2.2-liter longhood Nine-Eleven, ready for a new home. Opportunity knocks; are you ready to answer?

You are most welcome and encouraged to view this fine automobile in Ventura, by appointment, during the auction, or have someone inspect it for you. Please, perform your due diligence before you bid.

Please, note that this car is currently advertised on our Web site and on display in our Showroom. We reserve the right to accept a satisfactory offer and close this auction at any time.

Please, direct all inquiries to bill@californiaclassix.com or call us at 805-653-5551.

Ok, so we have a nice looking Gulf Blue 1970 Porsche 911T Coupe and as the ad notes part of the appeal here would be to get a good, not great, early 911 without having to spend a lot. The beautiful exterior isn’t its original color, but I think we’ll find almost unanimous agreement that Gulf Blue is better than Silver Metallic. A few of the rest of the details may need further questioning. The seller guesses the engine is original since it’s from the right period, but it does remain an educated guess. That would be nice to nail down. Similarly, its recent history looks to be available, but what about early history? I don’t think these are necessarily major problems, but they are the sort of thing that dictate how much someone might be willing to spend.

Bidding, as hoped, is pretty reasonable at $40,050, but the reserve is unmet. While I could be wrong I would think we should expect this to come in around $60K, probably a little below. We’ll see if that’s how things play out.

-Rob

1970 Mercedes-Benz 220D

The W114 and W115 is looked at as the generation that came before the legendary W123 came along and cemented itself as one of the best vehicles ever produced.  It’s not that the Stroke 8 are bad or anything, it’s just a tough comparison head to head against the W123. If anything, the W114/115 should be lauded as those cars featured the OM616 and non-turbocharged OM617 before being carried over into the new W123 chassis. Now that the newest W115 is 41 years old, a really nice one is hard to come by given they were used for all they had to give then tossed away due to their lack of collectibility. So when this 1970 220D for sale in Florida popped up, I had to take a closer look.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1970 Mercedes-Benz 220D on eBay

Year: 1970
Model: 220D
Engine: 2.2 inline-4
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 95,337 mi
Price: Buy It Now $8,900

Runs and drive very good no rust well maintained super clean – – – kept garage and covered
– 4 new tires
– new door seals
– new drive mirror glass
– new pillar seals
– new trunk seal
– new cv axle boot left and right
– new diesel filter
– 4 new brake hose
– new front brake pads
– new injection pump membrane diaphragm
– turn signails,break lights, headlights, high beams works without problems
recent oil change transmission oil change

title in hands

any question you can send a message

I can’t believe how great this car looks for 95,000 miles. The exterior shows fairly well but the interior and engine bay are nearly flawless. Either this car underwent a light restoration or the owner was fanatical about keeping it in perfect condition. Usually these cars are used as workhorses and don’t get pampered but this one is on another level.

The prices of nice W114/115s have been steadily rising over the past few years and while $8,900 seems like a lot for one, it’s tough to argue this one isn’t worth it. It’s probably one of the nicest 220Ds I’ve ever seen that was actually used. The only problem with these cars is that driving them is that 60 horsepower out of the OM615 is dangerous in situations where you need speed keep up with traffic. Around town or a leisurely cruise isn’t a problem, but you’ll be making a lot of enemies in this thing if you plan on doing freeway travel. Other than that, this W115 is a winner.

– Andrew

1970 Porsche 911E Targa

This 911 was always bound to attract my attention. It’s a Targa covered in a vibrant shade of blue and it looks in very nice shape; points that immediately serve in its favor for me. It’s also a 911E, which I’ve always liked as a middle ground between the entry-level T and the very sought after 911S. Step inside and what looks like a fairly basic interior suddenly makes me pause. First, this is probably the ugliest steering wheel I’ve ever seen. No big deal really; throw a Prototipo on (or find a period-correct wheel if originality is your concern) and move along. Then I notice there’s no radio. The ad makes no mention of a radio delete. We aren’t presented with the CoA so that doesn’t help. Now I’m intrigued and want to know more. Is this just a matter of a restorer deciding to remove the radio or is there something more to this 911E?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1970 Porsche 911E Targa on eBay

Year: 1970
Model: 911E Targa
Engine: 2.2 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 36,646 mi
Price: $119,995 Buy It Now

This is the vintage exotic so many of us long for. A 1970 Porsche 911E Targa offers many of the delicate design touches of the first-generation 911, and then adds power to the package. So when it’s presented in an interesting and correct factory color, this is an open top dream car.

The 911’s shape is legendary, and that’s why there is so much appreciation for a car like this. The narrower bodies, tidy proportions, and elegant simplicity showcase the iconic shape in its purest form. Porsches have always been high-quality machines, and this one continues that tradition today with doors that open and close effortlessly and exacting panel gaps. We even suspect a small fortune was spent on re-spraying the factory-correct pastel blue paint. It has the kind of luster that begs for the sunshine, and that’s exactly what a Targa model is expected to do. Enthusiasts easily identify this rarer open top model by its stainless steel hoop at the B-pillar and wrap-around rear window. Chrome was still in fashion in 1970, even in Germany, so this 911 retains its slender bumper trim, polished headlight rings, bright windshield surround, and those great vents that signify this is an early 911 that wanted to stay connected to another icon, the 356. And speaking of icons, the Fuchs wheels are a true Porsche hallmark.

The great thing about the air-cooled 911 era is that the moment you climb inside, they all have a familiar feeling like a close-knit family. The driver-oriented layout is engineered to make sure everything is within easy reach. Porsche’s race-ready sensibilities means the tachometer is directly in front of the driver. The rest of the instruments surround this in their own clearly marked pods to give you a comprehensive view of what’s going on with the engine. You view all of this through an upgraded Lecarra sports steering wheel. The targa top fits snugly, and easily stores in the carpeted trunk when you want the wind-in-your-hair driving experience. And because this 911 will be open to the world, the seats, carpeting, door panels, and whole interior is looking dark and crisp to make sure everyone sees this icon at its best.

The 2.2-liter flat-six has that unmistakable tone even at idle, and so you love one that looks well maintained and fires up with ease like this one does. This car is all about getting in, turning the key, and instantly start having fun. The motor was built to be driven like a performance machine, and Porsche made sure you had the control of a five-speed manual so you were an integral part of getting every last ounce of performance out it. The 911’s spirited fully independent suspension and four-wheel disc brakes are all part of a unique sporting package that truly helped it earn its motto of, “There is no substitute.”

This car is complete right down to its toolkit. It’s an example of open air European motoring at its finest. So now is the time to fulfill the promise you made to yourself. Call today!!!

I have no answers to my questions about the radio. I suspect it’s a simple case of a past owner deciding he didn’t want the radio, removing it and replacing it with a panel. A restorer (because I’m assuming this 911 has been restored, though that is not made clear) then kept that aspect as it was.

But perhaps there’s more. I don’t know. Honestly, I’m not familiar enough with the options available at the time this 911E was in production and whether a radio delete was an option. So I’m stumped. I’ll also admit that I may be making too much of this, but I’m fairly certain just about every 911 I’ve come across from the period has had a radio. Maybe that’s wrong, but as I said above I want to know more. This either will represent a learning moment for me or this 911E will turns out to be a little more special than I first suspected. Either way, it’s certainly unique. Any ideas?

(Oh, and since I didn’t mention it: the color is awesome and it’s really, really, pretty!)

-Rob

Motorsports Monday: Ready to Fly – 1970 BMW 2800CS Group 2 CSL Replica

BMW’s revolution and rebranding through racing started on March 25, 1973. At the Monza 4 hours race in the European Touring Car Championship, the “CSL” legend was born. Massive box flares, huge BBS magnesium race wheels and deep front spoilers adorned the delicate E9 coupe now, and the iconic German Racing White with blue and red stripes following the lines of the hood and sides of the car. And with drivers like Hans-Joachim Stuck, Chris Amon, and Dieter Quester BMW Motorsport would go on to win many races and establish the brand that would later launch the infamous “Batmobile” CSL, the 2002 Turbo, and of course the M brand. Prior to 1973, the top flight races were run by BMW through their partners Alpina and Schnitzer, and indeed the BMW Motorsport entrants at Monza failed to finish, with Niki Lauda at the hands of an Alpina E9. A few races later, the rear wing was introduced by BMW Motorsport, and in the hands of Dieter Quester the first BMW Motorsport win was recognized at the 24 Hours of Spa on July 22, 1973.

The 3.0 and later 3.5 CSLs would continue to race and win for a few years, establishing the brand as a serious contender to the established Porsche in the sporting market. Because of this, there were not only many in-period conversions to CSL race cars, but many replicas built since. This appears to be one of the latter – originally, a 2800CS which has been converted to look like the Group 2 racers with a period motor:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1970 BMW 2800CS CSL Group 2 Replica on eBay

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