1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe

I love a red interior. Even the very bright red interiors. Porsche has long made such interiors available to those who like them. I also am a big fan of the 964. Curiously, I’m not sure I’ve ever featured a 964 with a red interior. Well, at least, not a standard 964. I think there have been a couple ultra-rare models, but I won’t count those.

At last I have found one: this Black 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe, located in Los Angeles, with a Matador Red interior and 105,420 miles on it. I don’t think I’ve seen Matador Red before, not knowingly anyway. It looks great with just the right amount of brightness. While it may only be the lighting in these pictures it doesn’t appear quite as bright as some of Porsche’s other offerings like Can-can Red or Lobster. I think for most that likely gives it a nice balance. For those who find a black car to be a bit dull, perhaps this interior will help liven things up. It’s quite beautiful.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe on eBay

1991 Mercedes-Benz 300E

A few weeks ago I checked a wonderful Signal Red Mercedes-Benz 560SEC. I explained that on some Mercedes, red looks pretty good and suits the car well. Other cars, like sedans, red is a pretty tough sell for me. Encase you haven’t noticed by now, this 1991 300E that I am looking at today is painted in that same Signal Red. It is a very clean W124 that has under 100,000 miles and I really dislike it. Let me tell you why.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Mercedes-Benz 300E on eBay

Litmus Test: 1991 BMW M3

I’ll refrain from my typically verbose introductions, as even the few who only occasionally peruse our pages will need to hear about how, when, or why the E30 M3 came about. There’s not really much point in talking about the mechanicals, either – ‘S14’ has become nearly as recognizable as the chassis designation. Nor is this particular M3 a special edition, limited run, or race car. It’s not completely stock, it’s not perfect, it doesn’t have super low mileage, and it’s not the best color combination. No, there’s really only one reason to talk about this car. Price.

For a while it was only really outstanding M3s that were bringing big bucks. Pundits called it a bubble that was due to burst at any moment. I’m not here to say they’re wrong; it certainly does seem unsustainable. But, then, the U.S. economy also is pretty unsustainable if you boil it down to some basic facts, yet it seems to keep on rolling. And just two weeks ago another (albeit low mileage) example sold for $102,000. So today’s M3 is particularly interesting not because it’s the best or most rare example out there, but because it represents a much greater majority of the pool; cars that were driven and modified, even if only a bit, from their stock configuration. Yet unlike nearly all that are for sale today, the seller of this car has taken the brave step of testing what actual market value is:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 BMW M3 on eBay

BiChance: 1991 Alpina B10 BiTurbo

Here we are a week after looking at the 1990 Alpina B10 BiTurbo, and by chance, we get to look at a second BiTurbo. Last week’s was seriously suspect; there were alarm bells throughout, as major chassis issues and incongruous details were capped by a seller clearly looking to deceive the market. At first glance, there’s some cause for concern here, too, as we’ll see in a moment. Is this the case of another crestfallen hero, or does this super sedan hold true to its heritage?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Alpina B10 BiTurbo on eBay

Cologne Compressor: 1991 Ford Fiesta RS Turbo

Before we move any further, yes, I know this is a Ford. Ford isn’t German, you’re sure to say, not even when they’re masquerading as Merkur. Right you’d be. However, allow me a bit of latitude; first, Henry Ford was I’m fairly confident the only American to receive the ‘Grand Cross of the Supreme Order of the German Eagle‘ from one Adolf Hitler. I always love to toss that one into a conversation should I be cornered with a true-blue American-devotee proudly wearing a Ford hat at a social function because he’s also a ‘car guy’. “You know Henry Ford was basically a Nazi, right? I mean, beyond hating the entire Jewish race, he was also a megalomaniac who wanted to create his own master race of workers. No, I’m not joking – it was called Fordlândia. Look it up.” The conversation usually ends quickly after that.

Too edgy?

Okay, how about this – Ford Europe’s headquarters is in Cologne, Germany. And they produce a fair amount of cars in Germany even today. Since we consider the Volkswagens built in Chattanooga and Westmoreland, the BMWs built in Spartanburg, and the Mercedes-Benz models bolted together in Alabama, I think we can deviate for a moment into a hot Ford.

So what Ford is it? In many ways, this is the perfect follow-up for the Quattro. Audi and SAAB helped to mainstream turbocharging, and by the 1980s it was almost expected in performance circles. That culminated in a wave of ever increasing performance hot hatchbacks that completely changed our perception of speed. As newer, faster models emerged, the technology increasingly filtered its way into lower-spec models until the results of all of the turbocharging basically were acknowledged to be wrecking the world’s environment. I call it ‘Trickle-down Turbonomics’. The result?…

Double Euro Content: 1991 Volkswagen EuroVan

As much as I like to talk about the high prices being fetched for Corrados, GTIs and Sciroccos, the reality is the biggest numbers being asked and pulled from 1980s and 1990s Volkswagens are the vans. They’re not something I generally cover, but once in a while one pops up that is surprising and worth note. Today’s is no exception.

What attracted my attention first was the year – 1991. Of course, the main problem there is that in the U.S. market, the Eurovan didn’t launch until 1992. Volkswagen of America was still selling the niche and expensive T3 at that point. So was this a case of a transposition error or just an uninformed seller?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Volkswagen EuroVan on eBay

1991 Porsche 911 Andial/Porsche Motorsport Pikes Peak 3.8 Turbo

I’ve seen this car for sale for a little while and have kept meaning to come back to feature it. There’s just so much to take in initially and I’ve pulled up the listing a few times. It’s obviously far from anything original and is an extensive build, though it does possess interesting historical characteristics that should give it appeal beyond the typical custom build. It’s very bright, probably pretty loud and raucous, and sure to be very fast.

So let’s get the basics down. Effectively it sounds like this build began as a way to find a home for a very special engine: a 3.8 liter single turbo flat-6 producing 550 hp developed by Andial that served as the engine in a Pike’s Peak winning 964 Carrera 4 back in the ’90s. To house the engine a 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo with around 90K miles on it was found and work began. Those are excellent pieces to build upon. A suitable paint was needed so the designers reached back to the ’60s to source one of Porsche’s earliest pastels to show up on the 911: Pastel Blue. Combine all of that with a whole host of parts to improve upon the suspension and braking, along with a new interior, and you get the final product we see here.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Andial/Porsche Motorsport Pikes Peak 3.8 Turbo on eBay

Affordable E34 Face-Off: 1990 Alpina B10 3.5/1 v. 1991 M5

Just because it’s got an exotic name or badge doesn’t mean it’s automatically out of your reach. That’s the lesson for today’s twin E34s. If you’re willing to undertake a bit of a project you can certainly save money up front. Just like we saw with the S65 AMG Andrew wrote up, the initial cost you pay only going to be part of your total outlay but for the price of a small economy car, you can grab another league of luxury, performance and exclusivity that a Nissan Versa could never dream of matching. So which of these project E34s is the one you’d chose, or are both busts?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Alpina B10 3.5/1 on eBay

Tahoe Blue Metallic 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo

Update 12/31/2017 – the asking price on this 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo has dropped $20,000 to $109,995.

I always find it difficult to find 964 Turbos in interesting colors. Which is weird because of all the 911 models I feel like the 964 is the range I think had the largest number of unusual colors available. Porsche always has offered quite a variety, but it seemed with the 964 they let themselves go even further. But it seems buyers stuck with the more traditional options.

Here we have an obvious exception: a Tahoe Blue Metallic 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo, located in Brooklyn, with a color-to-sample Linen leather interior offset by a healthy dose of rootwood accents and 78,952 miles on it. I’m not very familiar with Tahoe Blue Metallic and this one is said to be 1 of only 3 Turbos equipped in this color combination. The extensive options list likely takes it to the top of that already exclusive company.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Tahoe Blue Metallic 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe

Let’s stick with yesterday’s blue theme and take a look at another of Porsche’s really nice blues. Here we have a Cobalt Blue Metallic 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe, located in Houston, with a light grey and blue interior and 74,452 miles on it. As should be immediately apparent, Cobalt Blue is a very pretty and striking shade of color. It doesn’t jump out at you as much as Minerva Blue does since it’s a darker shade, but though it may be more reserved it none the less shines brightly and exudes plenty of character. On the much more modern lines of the 964 – modern relative to an early 930 – it looks great bringing both elegance and excitement to this 911’s curves. It helps that this one looks in very nice shape!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe on eBay